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Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

only happens with windows 7. my XP generally is fine. this is incessant and generally renders foobar useless for me. i love the program..but this problem sucks. i need to add this is happening with a network drive only. makes no sense to me as its not generating an error in XP. help!!!!

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #1
Windows 7 and XP are completely different systems, so you shouldn't be surprised that they behave differently. Similarly, complaining with no details is unlikely to get you too much real help.

What type of network drive? Windows server, linux server, dedicated NAS? What version of software is the network drive device running? Is it up to date? Have you checked the release notes for the network drive software to see if it has any known issues with Windows 7? Has this always happened with Windows 7, or has it just started recently? Which version of Windows 7?

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #2
As Ouroboros said, and as is requested by this message atop every page in Support—
Quote
Please read foobar2000 Tech Support Forum Rules before posting and comply with all the points.
—more information would be an idea. Examples are: more details about your hardware and how it’s configured within foobar2000, whether this has always happened or is only recent, the list (in a codebox) of your components, and any other information that may be relevant.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #3
Windows 7 and XP are completely different systems, so you shouldn't be surprised that they behave differently. Similarly, complaining with no details is unlikely to get you too much real help.

What type of network drive? Windows server, linux server, dedicated NAS? What version of software is the network drive device running? Is it up to date? Have you checked the release notes for the network drive software to see if it has any known issues with Windows 7? Has this always happened with Windows 7, or has it just started recently? Which version of Windows 7?

dont mean to be rude..but acting like some sort of better than thou know it all aint great either. complaining? i stated my problem. i aint stupid..all my "shit" is updated...period..everything. my network drive...my anti virus...everything. that is the first damn thing i do. bottom line is..this is why i bought an apple..so i dont have to worry about the BS associated with MS/windows. i know all OS act differently..but each new one should be better than the last...should it not? if i need to detail all that you asked for..it aint worth my time i guess. all i should have to say for someone who really knows foobar is what i originally stated here. my problem is..again...preferences, media library, music folders/path. i mean what the hell should be so damn difficult for this program to behave properly? and i think i figured out what works anyway. i have an external drive (back up/music) at work also that is hooked up via "esata"..and when i add that together with the network drive it seems to behave. i originally simply added the network drive only. not saying that was the problem..but its behaving. i also think even though my path was a correct one..it was too branched...too convoluted. i cut it to a different folder and so far its OK. and its been a problem since i downloaded foobar on win 7. never a problem on XP. which to a black and white person like me...i simple believe each new OS should behave better than its predecessor. i know that is not realistic...but it should be! which version...who gives a rats ass? its that detailed that should matter? if it is...then foobar aint for me. but..i will keep using it and hope i dont get another response like yours..that is if i dont get booted from this forum.....

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #4
As Ouroboros said, and as is requested by this message atop every page in Support—
Quote
Please read foobar2000 Tech Support Forum Rules before posting and comply with all the points.
—more information would be an idea. Examples are: more details about your hardware and how it’s configured within foobar2000, whether this has always happened or is only recent, the list (in a codebox) of your components, and any other information that may be relevant.

well..if i knew what "other" info would be relevant id post it. you should be telling me whats relevant...should you not? what the hell kind of help/assistance is that? this should be a cut and dry solution. i am the only individual with this unique problem? hard to believe.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #5
Frequently Given Answer

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #6
well..if i knew what "other" info would be relevant id post it. you should be telling me whats relevant...should you not? what the hell kind of help/assistance is that?
We have both suggested some information. Besides, it’s not our obligation that we “should” do anything for you.

[…] its been a problem since i downloaded foobar on win 7. never a problem on XP. which to a black and white person like me...i simple believe each new OS should behave better than its predecessor. i know that is not realistic...but it should be! which version...who gives a rats ass? its that detailed that should matter? if it is...then foobar aint for me.
So, this big rant about Windows, how does it boil down to a problem with foobar2000?

Quote
but..i will keep using it and hope i dont get another response like [Ouroboros’s]
So, again, you think we’re obliged to tell you what information you should provide, but you passively-aggressively object to anyone doing so? Do you think this is going to help your chance of finding a solution?

Quote
..that is if i dont get booted from this forum.....
As much as an attitude like yours is unwanted here, I don’t think any of us want to provide the ego-massage that a ban would probably represent to you.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #7
look..i dont want to get banned. i asked for help previously and got a resolution promptly/quickly and perfectly corrected my problem. there was no help provided at all except for me to check release notes and versions. who said its an obligation? i said thanx didnt I? i also speak my mind..so what. no one gets hurt unless there is ego involved. speaking ones mind "gets it out there"...and then there is an understanding. what i am forgetting is possibly there are those that could help if they were on line...on this site..maybe. maybe not. it just seems like a relatively simple thing. its a path. i didnt think it was rocket science for developers. what rant? yea, i do think MS sucks..but it has its virtues. hey, if i was a braniac like you guys id develop foobar for apple. end of story. sooo, since i am using windows/MS..and foobar together..to me its a problem associated with both. i gave you more info..could it be a simple folder issue? all i know is most media players suck...not foobar. but i have never had a "path" problem with the aforementioned other media players. no doubt there could be underlying issues with conflicting "stuff" on my PC i guess. but believe me its clean....right down to prefetch. i dont object to assistance. in my mind i got none. again..there still might be some that could..who are not on line presently. could that not be assumed? a lot of shit comes down to how its said..not what is said. like right out of the box the comment im complaining. i stated a problem with foobar that im having..i dont think it warrants a comment about complaining. if thats it..then the path should be...>forum/complaining....enter here. thats what pissed me off. either help or dont. right now its monitoring my pathways...even if it doesnt it still is no big deal. i asked for help and i got...your complaining. i understand you guys need every damn detail of my PC..with release notes which i aint about to do. i still believe there is someone...somewhere who has the answer..and i just have not gotten it yet. if not..no biggy. leave it at that. i dont need any more reply's from anyone who already has. i got my answer. here is 1 "detail"..win 7 home premium....Oh...that is why! i need win 7 home premium, premium..premium. then foobar will work

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #8
It might help your cause to use paragraphs or some other means of organising your articulation.

who said its an obligation?
You; you said “you should be telling me whats relevant...should you not?”

Quote
i said thanx didnt I?
I can’t find an example of this, but if this represents you doing so now, then I guess you’re welcome… for whatever, since I thought we hadn’t done anything worthy of thanks in your eyes.

Quote
i still believe there is someone...somewhere who has the answer..and i just have not gotten it yet. if not..no biggy. leave it at that. i dont need any more reply's from anyone who already has.
Well, thank me for moving this back out of the Recycle Bin in case any such other person does want to offer help or suggestions. Now, I guess I’ll get out of your way as an unwelcome visitor.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #9
I still have not yet found any problem description. So, in order to get help, answer the following questions (from the FGA linked above):

1. What exactly did you do?

2. What exactly did the computer do?

3. What exactly did you expect the computer to do?

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #10
Maybe "complaining" was a bit harsh, but it hardly justifies your subsequent rants. If you'd simply pointed out that you weren't complaining, I'd have replied with an apology for my hasty/lazy English, and suggested "reporting a problem" as the wording I actually meant. Issue resolved, no hard feelings.....

Anyway, back to your original problem. Apart from telling us that your PC is running Windows 7 Home Premium you still haven't provided any useful details to allow anyone to help you resolve your problem. What is the operating system on the machine hosting your network drive? Which version of foobar2000 are you running? Which foobar2000 components do you have installed? These aren't unreasonable questions, even though you seen to think they are.

Also, I never asked for release notes for your PC. I suggested that YOU read the release notes for your Network Drive to see if it has any known issues with Windows 7. Again, not an unreasonable suggestion, nor a particularly onerous one, and certainly not one that requires any particular technical skills or knowledge.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #11
well, i found its happening with win xp home and pro..and win 7. must be the WD drive itself? all i know is everytime ( 99.9%) i start up foo it generally generates the error..then i will exit maybe once/twice and re-open and it finally will initialize and monitor. or i will remove and re-enter the path..which doesnt always work either. eventually it simply works. its odd. OK..i should have mentioned more than i did. i just assumed (should not have) that someone somewhere had to have this problem. that usually is the case. its a WD mybooklive model ap1nc. i doubt if that helps. let me ask you...if you need system info...tell me exactly what and how to give that to you and i will. do you simply want the default system info? win xp home edition (this particular PC)...version 2002, serv pack 3. shouldnt my network drive show up in computer management? i opened it to check it. i assumed it would be there. shouldnt assume anything i know. it shows in "my computer"..but not in computer management. is that right? aslo...how do i change the default path foo generates when we/I am in the configuration and select "reset page"? it defaults to "C" drive and naturally id like it to be my network drive that i manually path. could that have anything at all to do with it?

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #12
The problem is almost certainly with your NAS and the version of samba it is running. That's why I suggested this:
Have you checked the release notes for the network drive software to see if it has any known issues with Windows 7?


Read this post for more details.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #13
The problem is almost certainly with your NAS and the version of samba it is running. That's why I suggested this:
Have you checked the release notes for the network drive software to see if it has any known issues with Windows 7?


Read this post for more details.

again...man, why does everyone answer like we all know what the hell samba is? and NAS? i can look it up obviously..but i guess my version of assistance and everyone else differs. i looked up NAS and samba and i am still confused! u guys must  all be programmers. i mean i took cobol and rpg yrs ago and managed just fine. just aint up my alley. i can hack a tad and yet i dont get what any of u guys r talking about! no i have not checked the release notes and even if i did i doubt if it will help me. i appreciate the help though. it may not sound like i do..but i do. im just not gonna worry about it. if i have to do all that stuff for a media player to play..aint worth it. it works 50% of the time and when it acts up i just re-do the path. i dont much like win media and the like...but they dont have these kinds of issues..but are intrusive and dont do what foo can do. i love foo....i just wish it would behave for my uses. still..no biggy. thanx

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #14
FWIW, I have a WD MyBook World Edition (white lights) 4TB NAS. I previously had troubles with folder monitoring being very slow and general bad performance of samba on that device. I then upgraded the existing samba version on my NAS using the guides at http://mybookworld.wikidot.com/start (in fact I wrote the guide for upgrading samba, but you need to do some steps before to upgrade it).
It's only audiophile if it's inconvenient.

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #15
You don't need to be a programmer (I'm not, and although I can program a bit I'm definitely not a Linux system programmer). You just need to be able to do some basic system level updates using the command line, by following instructions.

NAS. On Google it's the third result returned - Network Attached storage. In your case we already know what your NAS is....
its a WD mybooklive model ap1nc.


SAMBA is a freeware CIFS/SMB file and print server and protocol implementation, used on all Linux based NAS devices (like the WD ones) to make files available to Windows clients. On Google it's the first and third results. As Microsoft has changed CIFS/SMB between the different Windows versions, so SAMBA has been updated to allow continued interoperability between Windows clients and Linux based servers. Don't worry about the details of how it works, you just need to be able to check version numbers and read release notes to see which bugs and features are addressed in each version.

So, here's what I'd do. Check the current software version on your WD Mybook Live - it will be on one of the management interface web pages on your NAS. Check WD support page for the release notes for the versions between your current version and the latest update, see if any of them talk about SAMBA being updated, and which version of SAMBA the latest version is using. Check that SAMBA version on the SAMBA web site, to see if any of the later versions of SAMBA talk about fixing Windows interoperability problems. Either way, update your WD NAS software to the latest version. If that doesn't fix the SAMBA problem then you're into updating SAMBA yourself, which isn't simple (i.e. it isn't point and click), but it's not massively complex. If you search the site Kohlrabi linked you to it gives you instructions for upgrading SAMBA on the blue light and white light versions of the WB MyBook World Edition - you'll need to do some digging to see if either of these works for your specific model, or if there are other similar instructions for your model somewhere on the web.

It really isn't complicated. If you can cope with COBOL and RPG it's well within your capability!

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #16
FWIW, I have a WD MyBook World Edition (white lights) 4TB NAS. I previously had troubles with folder monitoring being very slow and general bad performance of samba on that device. I then upgraded the existing samba version on my NAS using the guides at http://mybookworld.wikidot.com/start (in fact I wrote the guide for upgrading samba, but you need to do some steps before to upgrade it).

ok....i will look into this. thanx. i just need to get a handle on  samba...etc

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #17
You don't need to be a programmer (I'm not, and although I can program a bit I'm definitely not a Linux system programmer). You just need to be able to do some basic system level updates using the command line, by following instructions.

NAS. On Google it's the third result returned - Network Attached storage. In your case we already know what your NAS is....
its a WD mybooklive model ap1nc.


SAMBA is a freeware CIFS/SMB file and print server and protocol implementation, used on all Linux based NAS devices (like the WD ones) to make files available to Windows clients. On Google it's the first and third results. As Microsoft has changed CIFS/SMB between the different Windows versions, so SAMBA has been updated to allow continued interoperability between Windows clients and Linux based servers. Don't worry about the details of how it works, you just need to be able to check version numbers and read release notes to see which bugs and features are addressed in each version.

So, here's what I'd do. Check the current software version on your WD Mybook Live - it will be on one of the management interface web pages on your NAS. Check WD support page for the release notes for the versions between your current version and the latest update, see if any of them talk about SAMBA being updated, and which version of SAMBA the latest version is using. Check that SAMBA version on the SAMBA web site, to see if any of the later versions of SAMBA talk about fixing Windows interoperability problems. Either way, update your WD NAS software to the latest version. If that doesn't fix the SAMBA problem then you're into updating SAMBA yourself, which isn't simple (i.e. it isn't point and click), but it's not massively complex. If you search the site Kohlrabi linked you to it gives you instructions for upgrading SAMBA on the blue light and white light versions of the WB MyBook World Edition - you'll need to do some digging to see if either of these works for your specific model, or if there are other similar instructions for your model somewhere on the web.

It really isn't complicated. If you can cope with COBOL and RPG it's well within your capability!
ok...excellent help here. i just need patience (with myself) and time...and i will execute what u guys wrote here. i usually am my own worst enemy not willing to put in the time required to do this...but i will do whats instructed here. thanx again. now i think my problem will get corrected. foo is working pretty well right now..only occasionally generating an error. i know my mybbooklive is up to date. i ck that every time im on line along with all the other necessary updates. its why i like apple. its a 1 click update basically. too bad foo aint developed for apple. any chance it will?

Media library path status always=error, only with network drive/Win 7

Reply #18
OK....have to apologize. i think i may have an answer. i forgot that i went into "services" and disabled many items that i don't think need to run..including windows updates that i will manually turn on to find updates. i am certain i have network related stuff turned off. if i gave this list could anyone tell me which ones are vital? i think i can find out..but im not positive. i used this criteria below....

6:00 PM 3/7/2011
So, let's look at the services they want you to turn on.

    Automatic Updates
    Background Intelligent Transfer Service
    Event Log


If you get in trouble or the windows interface stops allowing you to enable or disable services from the screen found via Control Panel, this may help: http://www.jasonn.com/enable_windows_services_command_line
Warning: occasionally people break their PC badly by using this list of suggestions. Usually it's because they don't read carefully. But, proceed at your own risk.

You may want to watch this short video before you being.

Turning off unnecessary services in Windows XP can greatly reduce your exploit risk, while improving system performance. It's a good time to inject that often there are all sorts of "download optimizers" and other cute programs that vendors like to push on users. Most of the time, installing such things slows your computer down at best. It could subject you to potential security risks. The first rule is "If you don't know you need it, you probably don't."

Unnecessary services don't just subject you to security risk. They also slow down the operation of your computer. So, don't get lazy here and think you can just deal with the infections later. Go ahead and turn that junk off and recapture your system from these resource hogs. You get to services by going to Control Panel, Administrative Tools, then Services. You should see a long list of services, some running and some dormant. Use this checklist to help determine which services you can live without.

If you don't know how to find Windows Services in Windows XP, click on Start, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, and Services. Below is a simple step by step to finding and changing your services on Windows XP. Keep in mind that your view settings may make your's appear slightly different, but will be the same basic path.

Click on Start then Control Panel
Click on start, then click on Control Panel.

Click on Administrative Tools
In Control Panel, click on Administrative Tools

Click on Services
In Administrative Tools, click on Services.

Choose the Service to Modify
Choose the service you wish to modify.

Changing the Service Settings

Once you select the service you wish to modify, you have several buttons to turn the service off immediately, drop down choices to disable a service, make it autmatic, or make it manual.


Windows XP Pro (and Home); Stuff to turn off:

Each service is listed as it is in Microsoft's WIndows XP Professional. These should be similar in Microsoft's XP Home as well. Under each is the definition given in the Services Manager.

    * Alerter
      Notifies selected users and computers of administrative alerts. If the service is stopped, programs that use administrative alerts will not receive them. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: I don't want my personal computer telling me anything, ever. Shut up and work! There's few things I find more annoying than a computer constantly wanting to interact with me while I'm using it to do work or entertain myself. A computer is a tool, not a friend or work companion. No Hal, I don't want to talk to you. Perhaps there's a software vendor that can give you a compelling reason why you need this service, but for most home and SOHO PC use it's just an unnecessary service taking up resources and providing risk. Unless you are running a product that requires this service, disable it.

          Updated comment: Someone emailed me to say that if you're on a network where you are required to update your password periodically, failing to do so will generate a notice [if] you have this service enabled. If not, then obviously, your annoying local network won't warn you that you need to change your password and thus you'll get locked out. I've not tested this. But, if you have such a service on your network, you should refer to other admonitions in this article and leave managing your desktop to your IT staff(er). If you're a home network or don't know, read the paragraph above and use personal judgment.

    * Application Layer Gateway Service
      Provides support for 3rd party protocol plug-ins for Internet Connection Sharing and the Internet Connection Firewall

          Comment: Do you want to share your internet connection? That's an article waiting to be written. Let me be clear. Since you can buy a router for $50 or less, and Windows does an awful job routing, using a computer to gateway your other computers to the internet is just stupid. "What about firewalling and admission control?" Well, that's not going to be done through the built-in internet sharing tools. So, we''re not talking about that. If you use a personal computer to gateway your other computers to the internet (and calling it a server doesn't change the reality), you are wasting resources. Buy a $50 router, or a $1000 router for that matter. But, buy a discrete device that is designed to do the job. Use hardware based firewalling (OK, it's all based on software - but I mean a boxed solution, not software installed on a PC that's prone to lose autonomy). And, what about all those cute third-party firewalling tools that plug in to this thing? Man, give me a break. If it runs on top of your Windows installation, it's not a real firewall. Unless this is required by a product you think is necessary, disable it.

    * Automatic Updates
      Enables the download and installation of critical Windows updates. If the service is disabled, the operating system can be manually updated.

          Comment: There's only two options that may make sense with this service. You should either set it to disable or manual. I'd disable it. Automatic Updates is designed as a tool to aid Microsoft in controlling their product. Props to Microsoft for trying to protect their product from piracy. But, some updates have been known to cause problems. Use it when you need it, and disable it when you don't, unless you're too lazy to do updates on your own. Don't you wonder why all the computers in big, well managed networks don't run Automatic Updates? It's mostly because managers of big networks create their own update policies. If you more completely understand the thinking that goes into deciding whether or not to distribute an update, you could better administer your own PC. Either turn it on and assume the risk, or turn it off and regularly visit Mircosoft's update and news page (discussed more below).

    * Background Intelligent Transfer Service
      Uses idle network bandwidth to transfer data.

          Comment: This is one of those tools they require you turn on to enable Automatic Updates. Think about it. It connects your PC to the internet or network and works behind your back to do stuff you didn't explicitly tell it to do. It sounds like a great tool to help hackers collect data from your PC and slowly seep it back to their lair. Unless it's immediately required, disable it. It you use it and then go for some time with no need to use it, disable it. If you can't remember to keep your PC updated with the latest security fixes, you'll need it.

    * ClipBook
      Enables ClipBook Viewer to store information and share it with remote computers. If the service is stopped, ClipBook Viewer will not be able to share information with remote computers. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: So, you want to copy stuff to your clipbook and allow remote computers to access it? I don't. There may be a software vendor that requires this service to run. I've yet to find it useful. I suggest you disable it.

    * Computer Browser
      Maintains an updated list of computers on the network and supplies this list to computers designated as browsers. If this service is stopped, this list will not be updated or maintained. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: If you are on a network with other computers, and need to see them, this may be a useful tool. Otherwise, disable it.

    * Cryptographic Services
      Provides three management services: Catalog Database Service, which confirms the signatures of Windows files; Protected Root Service, which adds and removes Trusted Root Certification Authority certificates from this computer; and Key Service, which helps enroll this computer for certificates. If this service is stopped, these management services will not function properly. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: It is very necessary if you are passing certificates for networking. Unless you are in a large corporate network where connections are managed through authentication, this is unnecessary; disable it.

    * Distributed Transaction Coordinator
      Coordinates transactions that span multiple resource managers, such as databases, message queues, and file systems. If this service is stopped, these transactions will not occur. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Extremely few personal computers will require this service. If you use it, you may want to review the reasons it is being used. Unless you are accessing network filesystems and databases, disable it.

    * DNS Client
      Resolves and caches Domain Name System (DNS) names for this computer. If this service is stopped, this computer will not be able to resolve DNS names and locate Active Directory domain controllers. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: It's typically good to leave this on.

    * Error Reporting Service
      Allows error reporting for services and applications running in non-standard environments.

          Comment: Erorr reporting is very useful, if you know what to do with the errors or you are running software that adjusts based on error reporting. This is that annoying "feature" in Windows that constantly pops up wanting to ship information about your software failures to Redmond. People promise me it helps find problems and solutions. I've mostly seen problem reports that you could as easily search out yourself. If you're advanced enough to use this, you'll likely use a search engine just as well. Chances are, the best thing for you to do is disable it.

    * Help and Support
      Enables Help and Support Center to run on this computer. If this service is stopped, Help and Support Center will be unavailable. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: I don't find this service useful, other than sucking up resources. If you know how to use Google, I'd disable it.

    * Human Interface Device Access
      Enables generic input access to Human Interface Devices (HID), which activates and maintains the use of predefined hot buttons on keyboards, remote controls, and other multimedia devices. If this service is stopped, hot buttons controlled by this service will no longer function. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Whether or not you should disable this service, depends on other services you need. If you don't know, turn it off and see if it breaks anything. It says that it deals with hotkeys, however all the system hotkeys that most of us enjoy aren't controlled by this service, they are built into the core OS. Control C, for example, to copy and Control V to past, do not stop working when you turn this service off. It seems this has more to do with specific hotkeys that a software vendor may want to insert into their installed program or internet product. Until you see a reason for it, I'd turn this one off. Personally, I consider relying on such services to be lazy programming. But, there may be good reason for using it if it's more efficient.

    * Indexing Service
      Indexes contents and properties of files on local and remote computers; provides rapid access to files through flexible querying language.

          Comment: To date, nobody has shown me real system performance improvements with this technology. Keep in mind, I'm limited in this conversation to Windows. Indexing is very useful. Indexing databases is very useful. Indexing your computer isn't very useful at all. Typically, if you are on a network, you know where on a network to find your chosen data. If you are not on a network, there's no real performance enhancement to this service that justifies the complexity and resource use. Chances are good you should disable it.

    * IMAPI CD-Burning COM Service
      Manages CD recording using Image Mastering Applications Programming Interface (IMAPI). If this service is stopped, this computer will be unable to record CDs. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Obviously, there may be some usefulness leaving this service as manual, if you have a CD burner installed. If you don't, disable it.

    * Internet Connection Firewall (ICF) / Internet Connection Sharing (ICS)
      Provides network address translation, addressing, name resolution and/or intrusion prevention services for a home or small office network.

          Comment: This tool does a great job of complicating my internet connection and slowing down transactions. It's not likely this tool is sophisticated enough to make a major impact in your system's performance. You should disable it.

    * Messenger
      Transmits net send and Alerter service messages between clients and servers. This service is not related to Windows Messenger. If this service is stopped, Alerter messages will not be transmitted. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Turn this thing off! It's a simple kit for anybody that can connect via any network to your computer to access your system and do things you don't want them to. Disable it.

    * Net Logon
      Supports pass-through authentication of account logon events for computers in a domain.

          Comment: Unless you need this to operate inside a domain, it's likely not necessary or useful. If you are using a home or SOHO PC and don't have a local domain based network, disable it.

    * NetMeeting Remote Desktop Sharing
      Enables an authorized user to access this computer remotely by using NetMeeting over a corporate intranet. If this service is stopped, remote desktop sharing will be unavailable. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Do you really want a built in tool to share control of your desktop over your network connection? There are better tools for doing this kind of work, if needed. If someone you buy software from insists you let them use this tool to help you install it one time, then enable it and disable it immediately afterward. For typical use, you should disable it.

    * Remote Desktop Help Session Manager
      Manages and controls Remote Assistance. If this service is stopped, Remote Assistance will be unavailable. Before stopping this service, see the Dependencies tab of the Properties dialog box.

          Comment: Refer to NetMeeting. If you don't want to share control of your computer through your network, disable it.

    * Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator
      Manages the RPC name service database.

          Comment: There are some network programs and protocols that require this to be turned on. Chances are you could just turn it off and see if you break anything. If you are using a single PC in your home or SOHO, it's likely just a security risk. If you don't know you need it, disable it.

    * Remote Registry
      Enables remote users to modify registry settings on this computer. If this service is stopped, the registry can be modified only by users on this computer. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Seems self-explanatory. You can enable this service to help remote people or programs change your registry. Great hacker tool if you can't secure it. Disable it.

    * System Restore Service
      Performs system restore functions. To stop service, turn off System Restore from the System Restore tab in My Computer->Properties

          Comment: This is almost useless if you ever have a problem with damaged drives, corrupted data, or malware. It uses a lot of resources and isn't useful for most people. You can turn it on before you install a big piece of software. This service allows you to backup to a previous system should you mess your's up with an installation of software or a modification to your system settings, usually registry damage. To improve system performance and take the minor risk of not being able to make your computer work like it did yesterday, disable it.

    * TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper
      Enables support for NetBIOS over TCP/IP (NetBT) service and NetBIOS name resolution.

          Comment: Very few people use NetBIOS at home. This is the Windows built-in protocol for simple networking. You may need it. Otherwise, disable it.

    * Telephony
      Provides Telephony API (TAPI) support for programs that control telephony devices and IP based voice connections on the local computer and, through the LAN, on servers that are also running the service.

          Comment: If you use telephony, you probably use discrete devices or proprietary services that don't rely on this service. However, you do need this servive if you use a modem to connect to the ineternet. It's required by all sorts of hardware you wouldn't think require it, including accessing the internet via 3G telephones as tethered modems. Set this service to automatic to be safe.

    * Telnet
      Enables a remote user to log on to this computer and run programs, and supports various TCP/IP Telnet clients, including UNIX-based and Windows-based computers. If this service is stopped, remote user access to programs might be unavailable. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: There's just not a circumstance where I can imagine that turning this service on is a good idea. Unless you need to let people telnet into your computer and have a really good reason for doing so, disable it.

    * Terminal Services
      Allows multiple users to be connected interactively to a machine as well as the display of desktops and applications to remote computers. The underpinning of Remote Desktop (including RD for Administrators), Fast User Switching, Remote Assistance, and Terminal Server.

          Comment: As I've said above, there's better tools for remote desktop administration. The idea of Terminal Services is to allow remote desktop administration of a system, like the user was on the actual console. In almost all circumstances you should disable it.

    * Themes
      Provides user experience theme management.

          Comment: Themes are cute and bloated. Enabling themes is not a good way to increase performance, but you may think it's neat. If you aren't addicted to cute desktop eye candy, disable it.

    * Uninterruptible Power Supply
      Manages an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) connected to the computer.

          Comment: Unless you are using a UPS on your computer and it has the capability of managing the system, disable it.

    * Upload Manager
      Manages synchronous and asynchronous file transfers between clients and servers on the network. If this service is stopped, synchronous and asynchronous file transfers between clients and servers on the network will not occur. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: If you are not in a local network sharing data (files and/or services), disable it.

    * Windows Time
      Maintains date and time synchronization on all clients and servers in the network. If this service is stopped, date and time synchronization will be unavailable. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: Sometimes it works. Unless you are really needing your time to sync to something running a Windows time server, disable it.

    * Wireless Zero Configuration
      Provides automatic configuration for the 802.11 adapters

          Comment: Unless you use 802.11 devices, disable it.

    * Workstation
      Creates and maintains client network connections to remote servers. If this service is stopped, these connections will be unavailable. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

          Comment: If you are not in a local network sharing data (files and/or services), disable it.

If you turn off all the services suggested above and try to use Automatic Updates via WindowsUpdate.Microsoft.com, you will likely see a message something like this:

Windows Update cannot continue because a required service application is disabled. Windows Update requires the following services:

"Automatic Updates enables detection, downloading, and installation of critical updates for your computer.

Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) enables faster, restartable downloading of updates.

Event Log logs Windows Update events for troubleshooting. To ensure that these services are enabled:"

It's easy to just go back to Services, and turn these services on as you need them. An operating system shouldn't need daily updates to run. And, the more services you run, the more likely you are to need updates. See a circle here? Occasionally, a little laziness won't kill you. Though you could just go to Technet (Microsoft's only support for IT professionals) and get all your news and update files with descriptions of their efficacy and safety, you may occasionally just want to veg out and let Microsoft do the work for you. You should still read each update and decide for yourself whether it makes sense. Some of them are flat out bad news. But, turning up these services for a few minutes to run Automatic Updates may be a shortcut to periodic updates.

So, let's look at the services they want you to turn on.

Automatic Updates
Background Intelligent Transfer Service
Event Log

I haven't a clue why you need Background Intelligent Transfer Services to run so you can go to a website, download, and install service packs. But, you can turn it, and the others, on and then turn it back off when you are done. It's just three services.



If you turn off all the services suggested above and try to use Automatic Updates via WindowsUpdate.Microsoft.com, you will likely see a message something like this:

    Windows Update cannot continue because a required service application is disabled. Windows Update requires the following services:
    Automatic Updates enables detection, downloading, and installation of critical updates for your computer.
    Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) enables faster, restartable downloading of updates.
    Event Log logs Windows Update events for troubleshooting. To ensure that these services are enabled:

It's easy to just go back to Services, and turn these services on as you need them. An operating system shouldn't need daily updates to run. And, the more services you run, the more likely you are to need updates. See a circle here? Occasionally, a little laziness won't kill you. Though you could just go to Technet (Microsoft's only support for IT professionals) and get all your news and update files with descriptions of their efficacy and safety, you may occasionally just want to veg out and let Microsoft do the work for you. You should still read each update and decide for yourself whether it makes sense. Some of them are flat out bad news. But, turning up these services for a few minutes to run Automatic Updates may be a shortcut to periodic updates.

So, let's look at the services they want you to turn on.

  1. Automatic Updates
  2. Background Intelligent Transfer Service
  3. Event Log

Telnet
Enables a remote user to log on to this computer and run programs, and supports various TCP/IP Telnet clients, including UNIX-based and Windows-based computers. If this service is stopped, remote user access to programs might be unavailable. If this service is disabled, any services that explicitly depend on it will fail to start.

    Comment: There's just not a circumstance where I can imagine that turning this service on is a good idea. Unless you need to let people telnet into your computer and have a really good reason for doing so, disable it.


I haven't a clue why you need Background Intelligent Transfer Services to run so you can go to a website, download, and install service packs. But, you can turn it, and the others, on and then turn it back off when you are done. After all, it's just three services.

If you take a minimalist's point of view to running both software and services on your computer, it will perform faster and more safely than it will if you just randomly load anything anyone tells you to. To better secure your PC, stick to a mindset that if you don't absolutely need a service running right now, you should just turn it off.
For those of you that break stuff when you turn off services I suggest are unnecessary.

If you turn off all the stuff that blatantly doesn't have anything to do with the network, you should be fine. Then, turn off one thing at a time that you /think/ doesn't support your network connection. If you lose your connection, turn the service back on. Next, and this part is very important, make sure your network settings are accurate and set for "on" so you can reconnect. You should find out how your PC connects to your local network before you get started and document it. But, anything you turn off that breaks something needs to be carefully examined and documented (write it down somewhere).

Just because you turn a service back on, doesn't mean your broken software will magically start working again. For example, remember the issue of using a computer in your network to manage your connection? If that's how you connect, you'll have to reconfigure that connection to get online if you kill it by killing a service. Likely, Computer Browser will cause this kind of problem. Also, just enabling the service doesn't turn it on. You need to manually restart it, since the start, enable, stop, settings go into action on bootup. So, if you don't want to wait til your box reboots, you'll need to manually turn off the service if you want it disabled, and manually turn it on if you want to enable it (and see if that given service is your problem).

 
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