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Topic: What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal? (Read 7234 times) previous topic - next topic
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What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal?

This is one of those things that I am surprised to have not found much information about.

I have seen a number of posts that say you should set windows volume to around 80%, but to me, this appears to be very far from the truth.

Procaster (a streaming program) has a mixer, which reads out 0 dB when windows volume is set to 13.

I have an Asus Xonar DX soundcard which outputs toslink PCM to my headphone amplifier/DAC.  The control panel shows the levels in the frequency bands, and displays from -20 dB to 20 dB.  While the volume is set to 13,

What I believe so far is that there is a possibility of 20 dB boost, but that the control panel does not show the actual level relative to 0 dB.

When I use Renoise, I can record my Stereo Mix, and the levels on the recording look to be about the same as those shown by the Foobar peak meter, i.e. 0 dB, when my windows volume is 50.

I guess it should be set to 50, but I am still pretty confused.  If someone would clear up the 20 dB thing for me, it would be good.


What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal?

Reply #2
It varies for your sound card. I find that with my CMI8768 chipset (Diamond card), I can put it at full 100 and it'll be unity.

However, with some Realtek chipsets, I've found that raising it above 66-70ish starts to flatten the peaks. So I'd say 66 for Realtek chips.

What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal?

Reply #3
It varies for your sound card. I find that with my CMI8768 chipset (Diamond card), I can put it at full 100 and it'll be unity.

However, with some Realtek chipsets, I've found that raising it above 66-70ish starts to flatten the peaks. So I'd say 66 for Realtek chips.


I do believe that the intent was that full gain was supposed to be unity. Since it's a digital chain, that's the responsible gain structure.
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J. D. (jj) Johnston

What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal?

Reply #4
I can verify what tropicalfish reports. I have used on board PC sound that clips above a certain setting. It is not a responsible gain structure but it happens.

What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal?

Reply #5
I can verify what tropicalfish reports. I have used on board PC sound that clips above a certain setting. It is not a responsible gain structure but it happens.


Don't forget that some DAC's can not do full-scale output at some frequencies.  This isn't something that people generally want to get out, it seems, but I've seen some chips that can not handle a full-scale negative or positive digital signal.
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J. D. (jj) Johnston

What windows volume setting corresponds to an ungained signal?

Reply #6
I use my Sony/Realtek at 100% at all times. The fact that a "Fn" button has volume control that is the master control on windows leads me to believe Sony wouldn't make the maximum volume past 0db. It doesn't clip. My old Asus AC97 card used to clip after about 80% though, but it had a manual wheel volume control.

Using the loopback input, it appears I get clean gain even at 100.

Maybe this is an old problem that for the most part doesn't exist as commonly as it did on Windows 98/ME?

 
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