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Topic: How does one redo the tracks on a live recording? (Read 2114 times) previous topic - next topic
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How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

I want to change it so that the new tracks begin from the start of the song, as opposed to the speaking before the song. It seems awkward, at least with certain recordings. If you want to hear the rapping, listen to the whole thing.


What are the most professional ways to do this.

How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #1
Recordings should be multi-track, with, at minimum, one track for the music, one for the voice. With separate tracks, the relative positions can be easily adjusted in any multi-track editor.

In general, the music is recorded first, one track or 36 tracks,  whatever is indicated. One plays the music (as on closed headphones) and records the vocals on a new track in time with the existing music. This may produce what you want without any adjusting.

How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #2
No, I'm talking about a live performance broken up into one file per song. I have stuff that's broken up where each track starts with the pre-performance rapping. I want to change it so that that rapping is a part of the previous file and the new file starts immediately with the song.

How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #3
Any audio editor can accomplish this. You can join different audio streams and export them as one, as well as splitting. I can recommend Audacity or if the files are MP3s, MP3DirectCut which allows you to do this without re-encoding.

How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #4
The other approach is to combine the tracks into a single Image with CUE sheet and edit the CUE sheet in a text editor to the track start times you desire.

I have CUEtools and foobar2000, and both can do that.
Dynamic – the artist formerly known as DickD


How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #6
You need to specify what format these files are currently in and which medium the edited tracks are destined for.

If the latter is a CD, yes, you can have the introductory talking and such in the INDEX 00, meaning that it will effectively be part of the end of the previous track, displayed with a negative count-up to the start of the next one.

If you just want them to stay as MP3s or whatever, then editing will have to be done with a lossless editor such as pcutmp3 or mp3splt (of which we have plenty of previous discussions to read), or you will have to decompress and lossily recompress.

And so on. No one will know what to suggest until you properly explain what you have and what you want.

How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #7
Lossy files and Audio CDs are two things I don't deal with, because they're both lossy. CDs are lossy in that they cannot simply be copied and pasted to a computer; ripping software is required and the integrity of the rip can vary (using a high quality ripping program and an unscratched CD should be sufficient to rescue the audio.)

I simply want to move the tuning up and the announcements and whatnot to be at the end of the previous song. The new song begins with the blasting music, just like on a studio recording. Of course, this is not possible for the first song; the only thing I can do is make the "rapping" an isolated file.

I'm familiar with the suggestions mentioned. I imagined using Audacity would be very haphazard, as it would involve a lot of cutting and pasting. The foobar/CUE sheets suggestion is good. Because you can actually use the CUE sheet to create isolated files using foobar (I prefer isolated files as the new generation likes to cherry pick stuff and put it on their portable device. CD Wave sounds good, although I've never used it before.

So, I'm just looking for the most efficient, professional way to do this. If there are any additional suggestions, I welcome them. If not, I'll either use CD Wave or foobar.

 

How does one redo the tracks on a live recording?

Reply #8
Quote
I'm familiar with the suggestions mentioned. I imagined using Audacity would be very haphazard, as it would involve a lot of cutting and pasting.
I wouldn't say "haphazard"...  Editing is a creative process best done using your ears and human judgement, usually with some trial-and-error.

Assuming there is crowd noise, fade-ins, fade-outs, and cross-fades will give you a more natural sounding edit than hard cuts & splices.    Frequently when editing "live' recordings, I copy applause from one part of the recording to another.

If just want to change the starting-points and/or track numbers for the talking/rapping/singing on a CD without editing, that can be done with a cue sheet.  If there is a lot of talking (such as a band introduction) I'll usually make that a separate track.    If there is a song introduction, that goes at the beginning of the song, and if there's a "Thank you", that goes at the end.

Quote
CDs are lossy
You didn't say what format you have, but CDs are NOT lossy!  CDs use 16-bit, 44.1kHz PCM stereo.  The PCM audio data is byte-for-byte identical to a 16-bit, 44.1kHz, stereo WAV file.  You can rip an audio CD to WAV and burn a new CD and the audio on both CDs will be identical (assuming no errors).    The burned CD may have a different offset, and there some non-audio data will be different on a "burned" CD, but the sound will be the same!

 
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