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Topic: Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem? (Read 1938 times) previous topic - next topic
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Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem?

Is there any Linux out there that works with NTFS filesystem, my harddiscs are foratted in NTFS filesystem and I once downloaded and tried to Install opensuse 10, but unfortunately it didn't wor and I don't know why. It could not write on the harddisc and it could not create a new partition in the setup menu, it could not use the partitions I did in Windows using the partition manager aswell, unfortunately, it just displayed me them but I could not install it on them. It doesn't necesarilly have to use NTFS filesystem, but it should install on a hardisc that has partitions created by Windows, or what do I have to do in order to install Opensuse?

Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem?

Reply #1
What you are asking is conflicting, i.e. "doesn't necessarily have to use NTFS, but it should install on a harddisk that has paritions created by Windows". You would normally at the very least need to reformat one of the Windows-created partitions into a Linux filesystem.

However, given that you asking that kind of question, I think you really want something like this:

http://wubi-installer.org/

Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem?

Reply #2
No, I want to run it as a real OS, not as an app. So Ubuntu would be the right Linux? I tell you, I really tried to install Opensuse, but it could not install on any empty Windows partition and I don't have a clue why that is, maybe the download was bad.

Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem?

Reply #3
No, I want to run it as a real OS, not as an app.


Nobody suggested doing that, I don't see how your reply has anything whatsoever to do with my post.

Quote
So Ubuntu would be the right Linux? I tell you, I really tried to install Opensuse, but it could not install on any empty Windows partition and I don't have a clue why that is, maybe the download was bad.


You cannot install regular Linux distributions on a Windows formatted partition. As already said, you must reformat a Windows partition into a Linux filesystem.

If you do no want to do that, some tricks (which will slow down Linux) can be used, such as what Wubi is doing (installing everything into a single file which just sits in the Windows parition).

Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem?

Reply #4
I don't mind formatting a partition in Linux filesystem but tht's what the Linux installer faileed to do, it failed to create a new Linux parititon and I don't know for what reason.

Edit: "Wubi only adds an extra option to boot into Ubuntu." so that means I will be able to directly boot into Ubuntu, I hope it wont destroy my Windows boot.

 

Linux, that works with NTFS filesystem?

Reply #5
I don't mind formatting a partition in Linux filesystem but tht's what the Linux installer faileed to do, it failed to create a new Linux parititon and I don't know for what reason.

Edit: "Wubi only adds an extra option to boot into Ubuntu." so that means I will be able to directly boot into Ubuntu, I hope it wont destroy my Windows boot.

Download and burn a Linux Live CD (e.g. Ubuntu's one). Put it in the CD drive, make sure your BIOS is set so that it will boot from a CD before the harddisk and load a running Linux into your memory. Select the gparted program from the menu which will let you shrink, reformat, relabel, etc... interactively using point-and-click.

There might be issues if there is no swap partition for it to use or perhaps it just goes slowly. I have never tried it without.


 
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