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Blind tests of Microphones

Here's a Blog that proposes to contain proper blind tests of microphones:

http://www.homebrewedmusic.com/

(note that the 6/28 entry is actually an add-on, and that the test details are in the previous entry that you'll have to scroll down to.)

What do you think?

Blind tests of Microphones

Reply #1
This looks like a better, more scientific, approach than I've seen elsewhere.    It would be great if you were in the market for microphones and you could download files for A/B testing of all the mics under consideration.  Of course, you can't tell in advance how the mic will really sound with your sound-source in your acoustic environment, but you could a good idea of the differences between different microphones.

I read microphone reviews in Recording Magazine.  I wouldn't say the reviews are completely useless, but I think it would be very difficult to read several reviews and then choose the best mic (or best for an application), or to determine if a particular mic is "good enough".    They provide a frequency response graph and a polar response graph (probably manufacturer-supplied), they try to describe the sound, and it's helpful when they point-out a weakness or unusual characteristic.

Sometimes, they will compare the mic under review to a "known" standard mic (known to the reviewer), but IIRC, the reference mic is different every time.  And of course, there is never any mention of blind testing. Plus, the "testing" is different each time a microphone is reviewed.  It depends on whatever recording project the reviewer is working on at the time. 

It's not that much different from reading an audiophile publication.  (Overall, it's not a bad magazine.  I enjoy it, and I've learned from it.  But, I don't give much credit to the subjective evaluation of sound quality, especially when it comes to microphones & monitors.)

Blind tests of Microphones

Reply #2
This looks like a better, more scientific, approach than I've seen elsewhere.    It would be great if you were in the market for microphones and you could download files for A/B testing of all the mics under consideration.  Of course, you can't tell in advance how the mic will really sound with your sound-source in your acoustic environment, but you could a good idea of the differences between different microphones.

I read microphone reviews in Recording Magazine.  I wouldn't say the reviews are completely useless, but I think it would be very difficult to read several reviews and then choose the best mic (or best for an application), or to determine if a particular mic is "good enough".    They provide a frequency response graph and a polar response graph (probably manufacturer-supplied), they try to describe the sound, and it's helpful when they point-out a weakness or unusual characteristic.

Sometimes, they will compare the mic under review to a "known" standard mic (known to the reviewer), but IIRC, the reference mic is different every time.  And of course, there is never any mention of blind testing. Plus, the "testing" is different each time a microphone is reviewed.  It depends on whatever recording project the reviewer is working on at the time. 

It's not that much different from reading an audiophile publication.  (Overall, it's not a bad magazine.  I enjoy it, and I've learned from it.  But, I don't give much credit to the subjective evaluation of sound quality, especially when it comes to microphones & monitors.)


I agree with your evaluation of mic reviews in the various recording magazines. If you think that Mix magazine is bad, try Eq.

 
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