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Topic: 'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony? (Read 6749 times) previous topic - next topic
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'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

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Technical characteristics, BD is used in the "Blue Laser Diode (BLD)" and the introduction of cutting, BD has been developed as a material for the adoption of two polycarbonate polymer.

From short-wavelength blue laser by the use of the fine extreme processing has been realized. In addition, the adoption of semiconductor laser, cutting machines to improve the efficiency of the cooling fans by eliminating vibration. Can achieve accurate cutting.

In addition, the use of polycarbonate polymers, to reduce JITTANOIZU. Stampa (master mold) was carved into the pit by a polycarbonate by accurate transcription, to eliminate jitter, the quality of the master tape.


http://74.125.93.104/translate_c?hl=en&...lujyRKyKiFcQRhg



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Sony has decided to offer yet another technology that can, according to the firm, improve quality of conventional audio CDs. Sales of audio CDs have been declining for several years now since they cannot offer much higher sound quality compared to MP3 records sold by online stores like Amazon or iTunes...The Blu-spec CD uses blue laser instead of infra-red laser for recording, which automatically means more accurate data pits, which causes less distortion in the optical read-out process. According to Sony, this should improve quality of audio even on already available CD players.


http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/multimedia/di..._Recording.html



Well, what do you think about this Blue-spec CD??? Is this one of those marketing-driven HDCD technology?

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #1
If they believe that the reason that CD sales are declining is that the masters were created with the wrong color light, then they really are deluded.

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #2
I believe this is close to a fraud (like snake-oil). It addresses manufacturing of the (pressing) masters, but the Red Book CDDA format stays exactly the same.
Maybe that in Japan this kind of (semi)improvement seems to have a chance. (CD is so old we need something new, ah and it's compatible too  )
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #3
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The Blu-spec CD uses blue laser instead of infra-red laser for recording, which automatically means more accurate data pits, which causes less distortion in the optical read-out process. According to Sony, this should improve quality of audio even on already available CD players.
The error correction provided by standalone CD players since day one is secure enough to ensure that any errors introduced by such a problem will already be inaudible unless the disc is actually unplayable, AFAIK. Although the transition from pit to land and vice versa isn't quite as sharp with an infra-red laser as with a blue laser, a pit is still a pit and a land is still a land at the 1.6 ┬Ám pit size used for CDs.


'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #4
If they believe that the reason that CD sales are declining is that the masters were created with the wrong color light, then they really are deluded.

  I agree...

It's a good thing that they want to make the sound better in any way, but probably we all agree that this is the smallest problem now. First end the loudness war someway, after that we can talk about better cds or "better-than-cd" media...

But even then, my personal opinion is that we should drop red book cds completely. Storing audio as wave instead of digital data (and without compression and without tags) is a bit an old concept. Also at least dvd-s could be used instead of cd-s, so all this brings that we could go with at least 20bit/48khz...
Yes, I know, this would be DVD-A  , but I think that (or similar) is the way to go...

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #5
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Sony has decided to offer yet another technology that can, according to the firm, improve quality of conventional audio CDs. Sales of audio CDs have been declining for several years now since they cannot offer much higher sound quality compared to MP3 records sold by online stores like Amazon or iTunes...The Blu-spec CD uses blue laser instead of infra-red laser for recording, which automatically means more accurate data pits, which causes less distortion in the optical read-out process. According to Sony, this should improve quality of audio even on already available CD players.



First of all since when did the "sound quality" of MP3 records sold online become better then the uncompressed PCM data on a CD!? I want to know if it was a person who was quoted in the article or the technical journalist who made this comment so we can berate them for bad information once again. This new Blu-spec CD sounds of a high gibberish factor. I can smell BS from a mile away. Do they have any listening tests to back up their claims for less audible distortion? We heard the same thing about SACD and 1-bit Sigma-Delta Converters until a research paper was published in Canada that proclaimed 1-bit Sigma Delta Converters were not distortion free in the DVD-A vs. SACD debate. This Blu-spec is complete none sense without any emperical evidence. I do not care  what Sony "proclaims" once the research is there then I will start believing them. 
budding I.T professional

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #6
My opinion on this is that commenting on a google-translated-from-japanese and another source which has used (unintentionally) a word that it shouldn't is not good.

From what I read:

1) This does not affect the audio quality at all.
2) It does not affect the end user (the blue laser is used on production, not in playback).
3) It has a teorical improvement on the storage of the data in the physical medium. This improvement may help the equiment to track better on the event of disc damage.

4)
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Sales of audio CDs have been declining for several years now since they cannot offer much higher sound quality compared to MP3 records sold by online stores

The sentence says: CD audio quality is higher than MP3.
It also says that MP3 quality is near to CD on those sites (Let's remember that amazon sells 320kbps mp3 IIRC and iTunes sells 256kbps AAC).


So, guys... Don't put up the guns so fast next time, oki?

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #7
Japan, home of Blue-Spec. Japan, home of SHM-CD. Japan, home of the $800 glass-substrate CD. Japan, home of XR-CD.

Japan: home of absolutely useless expensive audiophile tweako snake oil CD variants.

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #8
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"More advanced standards, such as Super Audio CD or DVD Audio have not become popular, whereas Blu-ray disc audio is not used by anyone at all."


They simple serve an audiophile niche market and the amount of releases they have outside of classical or jazz is dismal. I think if more people had surround sound systems and more artists were willing to make 5.1 mixes of their records it would be a whole different story. Until that day comes the CD is going to remain an optimal standard for releases.


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My opinion on this is that commenting on a google-translated-from-japanese and another source which has used (unintentionally) a word that it shouldn't is not good.


Another reason why people in the U.S should learn more then one langauge (I heard it's mandatory in other countries outside the U.S)  I took a begineer Japanese class in college. I am pretty sure if I had the right resources in front of me I would be able to read a portion of that. 


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The sentence says: CD audio quality is higher than MP3.
It also says that MP3 quality is near to CD on those sites (Let's remember that amazon sells 320kbps mp3 IIRC and iTunes sells 256kbps AAC).


So, guys... Don't put up the guns so fast next time, oki?


That's not what I interpreted it as. I am sorry if I am stickler for language and jargon here, but the word we use is "transparency" not "CD quality".

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Japan, home of Blue-Spec. Japan, home of SHM-CD. Japan, home of the $800 glass-substrate CD. Japan, home of XR-CD.

Japan: home of absolutely useless expensive audiophile tweako snake oil CD variants.


I am in complete agreement with you there (the whole concept is good in theory, but nobody is going to want to pay an extra $45 dollars for a Blu-Spec CD). I remember reading about the glass-substrate CD a few years back. I think if I am not mistaken that was the one an older engineer designed for the next generation with his kids in mind? or I am thinking of something entirely different. 
budding I.T professional

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #9
I read an article about this on Engadget a few days ago.  Looks like Sony is up to their old tricks by releasing yet another new audio medium.  MiniDisc failed to greatly impact the market (it was doing fine for awhile but CD remained the dominant format), SACD has failed to greatly impact the market, their Memory Stick Pro Duo cards didn't catch on outside of the Sony universe, and now they are trying this.

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' date='Nov 6 2008, 13:35' post='597762']
The sentence says: CD audio quality is higher than MP3.
It also says that MP3 quality is near to CD on those sites (Let's remember that amazon sells 320kbps mp3 IIRC and iTunes sells 256kbps AAC).

So, guys... Don't put up the guns so fast next time, oki?


Actually, Amazon sells either 256kbps CBR FhG/Lame 3.93.1 files or -V 0 Lame 3.97 files.  They do not offer 320kbps CBR mp3s.  The Zune marketplace offers 320kbps CBR files but not Amazon.  Additionally, everyone is putting "up the guns" quickly as this is Sony and they are up to their old tricks again.  Sony is the king (or queen depending on your perception) of coming out with new formats that flop.  Sony touts their superiority yet their technologies are always more expensive yet their superiority is often not seen.  Sony said that Memory Stick Pro Duo was better than SD/MMC and yet the later offers faster transfer speeds, higher capacities, and use outside of the Sony universe.  Sony said that SACD was better than CD (it technically is) but no one wanted to pay $30 for an album when they could pickup the CD version for $7-$10.  Sony has said a lot of things about their formats and most of them flop.

The only Sony formats (aside from standard CD) that are alive today are their memory stick pro duos (they are only surviving thanks to Sony forcing them onto their customers) and Blu-ray.  SACD is technically dead though a few albums a year come out on it.  People are tired of Sony and the way they are working.  We don't need another format if it isn't going to offer any benefits over what we already have without drastically increasing the costs.

'Blu-spec CD' technology from Sony?

Reply #10
That's not what I interpreted it as. I am sorry if I am stickler for language and jargon here, but the word we use is "transparency" not "CD quality".

I didn't want to change the sentence too much. I do understand the difference between both. (as it equals to the difference between lossy and lossless).

 
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