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cleaning vinyl audio?

Reply #75
Paul, probably this:

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if you listen to #2 carefully you will hear that the bass guitar notes - especially the first one - are quite badly affected, both in volume and in timbre.


Can be explained by this:

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my first approach with audio restoration tools was with the plug-in offered with Total Recorder (TR). There one could define also parameters like “attach and release speed” to specify how quickly the algorithm should react to changes in music level. Parameters not found elsewhere, although something similar is in VS (point 7 of above), perhaps to cope in real time with processing during recording. This will unavoidably nibble useful material at attack and leave noise tails at the end.


And treated better with an approach like this:

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But in batch processing of wav files we know what comes before and what there is after, so dynamic adaptation could be done on the basis of a perfect “centered average” of signal RMS which is known exactly at any given time.

(Just an old engineer and sw developer in other fields opinion...  )


cleaning vinyl audio?

Reply #76
Yes, that's an interesting idea, although it wouldn't fit our software architecture as filters are applied to a data stream, rather than a file.  This lets us filter MP3 files too, and, we hope, other formats in the not-too-distant future.

Would you like me to send you the sound sample?  You could then try it in Wave Repair (and whatever other programs you have handy), see how it fares, but I imagine you will get much the same result.  Our hiss filter does adapt dynamically, based on what it has seen recently.  The 'quality' slider controls how rapidly it does so ('better cymbals' = faster adaptation).  The sample I posted was on the middle setting.

Rgds - Paul.
I am an independent software developer (VinylStudio) based in UK

cleaning vinyl audio?

Reply #77
Mine belt-drive TT has had one for years, a low level (mainly audible on headphones during quiet parts) hum only when the stylus is in contact with a record (and only when the motor is running).  I'm guessing that means some sort of mechanical resonance, but no one was able to fix it (this was decades ago when I last took it in for fixing to some hack who was running a local audio salon; he claimed it was fixed but of course when I got it home, it wasn't).

Does the hum get louder when the pickup is closer to the position of the motor? (Usually the motor is on the opposite side from the pickup arm, so in most cases we're talking about the hum increasing as the arm gets towards the center of the platter). If it does, this sounds like a classic case of pickup from the windings in the motor. Grado cartridges used to be especially susceptible to this (don't know if they still are).



My recollection is that this is indeed the case (hum louder during the lead-out than the lead-in) but I'll have to verify.

If it turns out to be the case , is there any remedy short of changing carts? The one on there is a Shure V15-Type V-MR.



cleaning vinyl audio?

Reply #78
Does the hum get louder when the pickup is closer to the position of the motor?

My recollection is that this is indeed the case (hum louder during the lead-out than the lead-in) but I'll have to verify.

If it turns out to be the case , is there any remedy short of changing carts? The one on there is a Shure V15-Type V-MR.

The usual recommendation is to change the cart, but in your case ditching a V15-VMR would seem a bit sacreligious.

Change the turntable? :-)

Perhaps it might be possible to rig up some sort of grounded shielding around the body of the motor.

cleaning vinyl audio?

Reply #79
Does the hum get louder when the pickup is closer to the position of the motor?

My recollection is that this is indeed the case (hum louder during the lead-out than the lead-in) but I'll have to verify.

If it turns out to be the case , is there any remedy short of changing carts? The one on there is a Shure V15-Type V-MR.

The usual recommendation is to change the cart, but in your case ditching a V15-VMR would seem a bit sacreligious.


Indeed, as they are out of production, now.

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Change the turntable? :-)


As in modify?

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Perhaps it might be possible to rig up some sort of grounded shielding around the body of the motor.


Grounding relates to transmission of hum by means of an electric field, which seems unlikely.

I'd guess that the hum is due to a magnetic field radiating from the TT motor.  Magnetic shielding need not be grounded, but does need to be made out of a magnetically soft material such as soft steel or mu metal. Sometimes copper shorting pieces can help.

People who build turntables based on motors that radiate strong hum fields must not know what business they are in. Let me guess - Rega?

cleaning vinyl audio?

Reply #80
it's a Systemdek IIX

 
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