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"Hiding" a subwoofer

Yeah, so how to properly set-up and "hide" a subwoofer? I'm talking about the sound, where most multimedia subs will call attention to themselves while most higher-end subs don't make their presence known. What's the difference? And how to make my multimedia and car sub "hide" more? Is there a specific crossover settings or whatever that can help to hide a sub?

Thanks.

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #1
Yeah, so how to properly set-up and "hide" a subwoofer? I'm talking about the sound, where most multimedia subs will call attention to themselves while most higher-end subs don't make their presence known. What's the difference? And how to make my multimedia and car sub "hide" more? Is there a specific crossover settings or whatever that can help to hide a sub?


I think the issue is that most Multimedia Speaker Systems don't really have subwoofers. 

They may claim to have them, but most often the big box you put on the floor is a regular woofer (or even a midrange speaker) in a bass-enhancing plastic cabinet with an amplifier amping the bass/bass-mid frequencies.

So, the problem is:  unlike a subwoofer that only puts out very low frequencies that humans generally have difficulty determining the placement/direction of (or even hearing with the ears), the MMSS's big box is putting out semi-low end, which we still experience as directional sound.

-brendan

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #2
Yeah, so how to properly set-up and "hide" a subwoofer? I'm talking about the sound, where most multimedia subs will call attention to themselves while most higher-end subs don't make their presence known. What's the difference? And how to make my multimedia and car sub "hide" more? Is there a specific crossover settings or whatever that can help to hide a sub?

Thanks.
You can start to locate sources once they get higher than ~80Hz.  The cheap multimedia subs usually have much higher frequencies due to being smaller and covering high bass frequencies that the tiny satellite speakers can't.  Even if the sub has a high-pass cut off above 80Hz, if the cutoff slope isn't steep enough (24dB/octave) or the sub is producing distortion harmonics, it will also be easy to locate.

A quality sub sounds like it is coming from the satellite speakers only.  I keep mine hidden in an unused fireplace behind my TV stand/table and it is seamless until something else in the room stats to rattle LOL.

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #3
So is the magic number is 80Hz? I *think* I need to lower the sub crossover freq on my car. And the multimedia system that I'm speaking about is Klipsch iFi, if that helps.

How much power is enough for a sub btw?

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #4
What do you want to do with it? Several thousand watts are offered in some of the high end boxes.

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #5
[quote author=AndyH-ha link=msg=458105 date=1166436069]What do you want to do with it? Several thousand watts are offered in some of the high end boxes.[/quote]

I just mean the "general" relationship between your main amp's watts and sub amp's watts, i.e how much should I get for a n watts of main amp.

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #6
The amount of power you pump into a (proper) subwoofer depends on the subwoofer's ability. To big and you run the risk of damaging the subwoofer. Too small... no danger except that listeners may complain that your setup lacks the 'oomph' associated with subwoofers

Generally, stick to manufacturer's recommendation, and never exceed that.

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #7
And usually, placing the sub in a corner will maximize its perceived output, though possibly at the expense of even room response.

"Hiding" a subwoofer

Reply #8
So is the magic number is 80Hz? I *think* I need to lower the sub crossover freq on my car. And the multimedia system that I'm speaking about is Klipsch iFi, if that helps.

How much power is enough for a sub btw?


It depends on what you are doing. For example for home theatre the LFE channel carries signals below 125Hz, for music you want something considerably lower for directionality reasons my sub is variable between 40 and 125Hz. I generally leave it on 125Hz and my processor digitally crosses over depending on what mode it is in.

Many subs are active so the question doesn't arise, for passive ones stay within the manufacturers guidelines for your unit.

 
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