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Topic: AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?! (Read 4550 times) previous topic - next topic
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AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?!

As stated here: http://www.kellyindustries.com/diy_5_1.html

It seems I could use any DD-encoder, spit out an ac3-file (using 44.1kHz @ 256kbps) and change the extension to .wav?!  Is it really that simple?  I use APack/Compressor on OSX and it doesn't have an option to output with a wav-extension (as opposed to SurCode's DTS-wav and others).

'Have looked all over the forum, but haven't seen this being answered yet?!

AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?!

Reply #1
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As stated here: http://www.kellyindustries.com/diy_5_1.html

It seems I could use any DD-encoder, spit out an ac3-file (using 44.1kHz @ 256kbps) and change the extension to .wav?!  Is it really that simple?  I use APack/Compressor on OSX and it doesn't have an option to output with a wav-extension (as opposed to SurCode's DTS-wav and others).

'Have looked all over the forum, but haven't seen this being answered yet?!
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Well, I would rather make DTS CD, as it would use all those bits and result in a potentially (don't want to violate TOS) better-sounding mix.  With a Dolby Digital CD, you're wasting a lot of space.  You would be better off making a CD-R with the DD tracks as files, as you could hold a lot more music on the disc.  Of course, the downside would be that it would have to be played in a computer.

Changing the extension of an AC3 file to WAV will not work, as the WAV is completely different format and will be much larger.  In the article, he asks if anyone knows of a program that would do the conversion properly.  What would be needed is something that could pad the samples with zeroes after the DD data for each second.

AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?!

Reply #2
There might be a problem playing those 256 kbps files via a regular CD player hooked up on a DD decoder: Bitrate. The CD player gives you 1.4 mbit/s. So, the DD decoder would get the 256 kbps data 5.5125 times too fast.

DTS supports the exact bitrate an uncompressed CDDA PCM stream has (either 1411.2 kbps packed into a 16 bit PCM signal or 1234,8 kbps packed into a 14 bit PCM signal (zero-stuffed to 16 bit) I believe -- the latter one avoids blowing your ears in case you accidently did a wrong setup)

Sebi

AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?!

Reply #3
It's not that I'm so keen on DD on a regular CD: I encode my own stuff to DTS indeed. Even ordered the Minnetonka DiscWelder Bronze, so I can do DVD-A. Its' just that when I'd like to do a quick 'n dirty check on AC3-files on external systems, I need to burn a DVD (how's that for wasting space) or decode-encode it. I'm looking for a simple way to convert AC3 in something a regular DVD-player would recognize. I guess WMA and MP3 are off as options, right?!

AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?!

Reply #4
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There might be a problem playing those 256 kbps files via a regular CD player hooked up on a DD decoder: Bitrate. The CD player gives you 1.4 mbit/s. So, the DD decoder would get the 256 kbps data 5.5125 times too fast.


Well, that seems to be the point of padding the data with zeroes.  The decoder gets the DD data, then enough zeroes to equal 1.4Mb, each second.

TapeTV, you asked if MP3 was an option.  Many DVD players will play MP3 files on a CD-R.  Although not every player will play them, just about any player you buy nowadays will.  However, you may not be able to output the audio through the digital out.  The last player I bought four years ago said in the manual that it would mute the digital output when playing MP3 files because of SDMI (Secure Digital Music Interface).  I don't know if this is common though.

 

AC3 256kbps on a regular CD-r?!

Reply #5
Quote
Quote
There might be a problem playing those 256 kbps files via a regular CD player hooked up on a DD decoder: Bitrate. The CD player gives you 1.4 mbit/s. So, the DD decoder would get the 256 kbps data 5.5125 times too fast.


Well, that seems to be the point of padding the data with zeroes.  The decoder gets the DD data, then enough zeroes to equal 1.4Mb, each second.
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Oh, yes... That'd be possible. Shame on me for not visiting the link above before writing a reply.

Sebi

 
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