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Going Lossless

Reply #25
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Who cares if FLAC does not exist anymore in 10 years from now ? If you keep the current binaries, you will be able to decode your FLAC files to whatever format you like then

Ten years is a long time for code rot to set in.  WIll intel bother with x86 compatibility after a couple of generations of 64 bit processors?  At this time can you count on all the old windows 3 (or less!) programs from 10 years ago to just come up and run on XP?

But we aren't talking about walking away for 10 years.. you will have time to transcode to something more current.  The biggest concern might be those proposals to enforce DRM in the CPU hardware.... no audio/video processing at all without authenticatiion of DRM compliance.

You can still run (MUCH older then) 10 year old 16 bit code in Windows, I'm going to say that yes they will.  Theres just too much x86 code out there for it to ever just go away.

Going Lossless

Reply #26
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Who cares if FLAC does not exist anymore in 10 years from now ? If you keep the current binaries, you will be able to decode your FLAC files to whatever format you like then

Ten years is a long time for code rot to set in.  WIll intel bother with x86 compatibility after a couple of generations of 64 bit processors?  At this time can you count on all the old windows 3 (or less!) programs from 10 years ago to just come up and run on XP?

But we aren't talking about walking away for 10 years.. you will have time to transcode to something more current.  The biggest concern might be those proposals to enforce DRM in the CPU hardware.... no audio/video processing at all without authenticatiion of DRM compliance.

You can still run (MUCH older then) 10 year old 16 bit code in Windows, I'm going to say that yes they will.  Theres just too much x86 code out there for it to ever just go away.

Exactly, you can still run DOS code, the encoder executables are all standalone now anyways, and everything from linux to windows XP still reads the oldest FAT formatted disks.  Code and data compatibility shouldn't be a problem whatsoever.

And to chime in on those saying lossless takes up lots of space, I've got a pair of 200GB drives that are almost 3/4 full, and I'm still re-ripping my own CD collection.  Currently at 517 lossless albums or ~6700 FLAC's and 537 lossy albums or ~7300 Musepac files.  If I had everything I have in Musepack re-ripped into FLAC I'd need at least another 200GB drive just to hold it all, not to mention having space to add more.  I'm eagerly anticipating the drop in price of the 300GB drives over the next year or so, and anyone with a large CD library going lossless probably is too.  Something to keep in mind.  120GB is pretty small when talking about lossless, especially if you're encoding modern music that averages around 65% or higher it seems.

G

Going Lossless

Reply #27
Please remember that you need two drives to store your hard ripped albums.  One for the rips, and one for the backup of the rips.  The second drive should be disconnected from the PC when not being written to and preferably kept off-site.

Your codec may well be usable 10 years from now, but you will have to re-rip everything anyway when your spindle fails.

Data loss is not fun.  Please, everyone, backup.

Going Lossless

Reply #28
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Who cares if FLAC does not exist anymore in 10 years from now ? If you keep the current binaries, you will be able to decode your FLAC files to whatever format you like then

Ten years is a long time for code rot to set in.  WIll intel bother with x86 compatibility after a couple of generations of 64 bit processors?  At this time can you count on all the old windows 3 (or less!) programs from 10 years ago to just come up and run on XP?

But we aren't talking about walking away for 10 years.. you will have time to transcode to something more current.  The biggest concern might be those proposals to enforce DRM in the CPU hardware.... no audio/video processing at all without authenticatiion of DRM compliance.

You can still run (MUCH older then) 10 year old 16 bit code in Windows, I'm going to say that yes they will.  Theres just too much x86 code out there for it to ever just go away.

Well,  you never know..  there are Win95 programs that won't run on XP.

Some old demo programs written back 12-14 years back won't run because there's no 386 extended memory structure like there used to be, you need the hardware or the specific assembly code can't work.

But, overall I'd guess that running FLAC files to transcode into ??? 10 years from now is pretty likely, as things have been getting more generic than hardware/software specific.

 
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