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Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #125
the VBR is not a panacea

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #126
But consider  vbr and cbr options in the future to force a low bitrate.

It is excellent for music, but I like also speech options and not always 64 kbps.

Still I'd like an encoder that rarely goes more than 63 kbps.

the VBR is not a panacea
When I was a teen I wanted to go out with Claudia Schiffer. But... she seemed not to be interested in.  :-[

I’m also very excited like You about this new encoder, guys, but  it’s also a  good time to put myself on someone's shoes and see that there  is an open test which would help somewhat to a development. Then, maybe,  if there is a possibility  I would kindly ask for some feature .

Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #127
Thanks, Igor! Yes, some more volunteers in the 32-vs-44.1-kHz test would be very nice.

It is excellent for music, but I like also speech options and not always 64 kbps.
...
Still I'd like an encoder that rarely goes more than 63 kbps.
May I ask for what application? Audio books? For that purpose CVBR mode 1 might actually do the job. Near-mono audio should end up quite a bit below the target rate (64 kbit/s for mode 1), as guruboolez has shown.

m14u, since you've done nice analysis tables in the past: would it be possible for you to generate a new table for CVBR modes 1 and 2, with 22.05-32 kHz input sampling rate, for the latest Git version? For those posting executables here: no need to post another round, please wait for the final release at the end of the month.

Chris
If I don't reply to your reply, it means I agree with you.

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #128
May I ask for what application? Audio books? For that purpose CVBR mode 1 might actually do the job. Near-mono audio should end up quite a bit below the target rate (64 kbit/s for mode 1)

Good morning Mr. Christian R. Helmrich,
first of all I want to thank you for the work you have done and which I appreciate very much.

In my opinion, in the next few years we will still see an increase in the bandwidth used on the cellular network and more of the video on small screens will increase the consumption of very long audio recordings. In my country it is still not uncommon to find radio stations that for example still release podcasts in mp3 format and above all for those who make information or who keep the sessions of parliaments the conservation of audio recordings will become a problem to solve. So let's take an example with local information, take the latest news from my area and observe the result (I'm sure that in some conditions the use of AAC-ELD is still advantageous).

Our source will be the file:
https://pod.radiopopolare.it/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.mp3
listed on the page:
https://www.radiopopolare.it/trasmissione/metroregione/

I will convert the file in multiple steps using macOS from the terminal with the command
afconvert /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.mp3 -d LEF32 -c 1 -f caff --soundcheck-generate --anchor-generate --src-complexity bats -r 127 /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.caf
and then
afconvert /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.caf -d LEF32@[fs] -f WAVE --soundcheck-read /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48-[fs].wav

Then I compile your software, commit 90b8af55, for modern Mac, downloadable from here.

So I created three very compressed versions to have examples of quality that is no longer acceptable today.

1 ch,  8.000 Hz, aac, 17.662 bps - 1.728.129 byte
1 ch,  8.000 Hz, Qclp, 14.000 bps - 1.347.222 byte
1 ch,  8.000 Hz, samr, 12.796 bps - 1.228.006 byte

Later I created the tracks with exhale #1 and the quality obtained is superior to my expectations.

1 ch,  8.000 Hz, usac, 18.123 bps - 1.767.687 byte
1 ch,  12.000 Hz, usac, 25.062 bps - 2.445.115 byte
1 ch,  16.000 Hz, usac, 32.162 bps - 3.138.174 byte
1 ch,  24.000 Hz, usac, 34.163 bps - 3.353.821 byte
1 ch,  32.000 Hz, usac, 34.958 bps - 3.453.941 byte

Finally the same tracks created with exhale #2.

1 ch,  8.000 Hz, usac, 21.957 bps - 2.135.627 byte
1 ch,  12.000 Hz, usac, 31.130 bps - 3.027.507 byte
1 ch,  16.000 Hz, usac, 40.562 bps - 3.944.230 byte
1 ch,  24.000 Hz, usac, 39.281 bps - 3.844.930 byte
1 ch,  32.000 Hz, usac, 40.802 bps - 4.014.612 byte
1 ch,  44.100 Hz, usac, 41.397 bps - 4.107.824 byte
1 ch,  48.000 Hz, usac, 41.511 bps - 4.130.556 byte

In conclusion, although exhale offers a much better quality, but in terms of bitrate it is still superior to first 8kHz AAC, so there is room for further improvements. Today all mobile phones with Android or iOS, and all Macintosh, have the USAC decoder already installed. For Windows 10, the manufacturer needs to adapt and I will urge the European Union to intervene so that the USAC decoder become quickly mandatory in supplies for the Public Administration. For Linux, users of this OS are generally more autonomous and this is an important difference compared to the past because if today I publish a content that is not immediately decoded, many users will simply do nothing to get around the obstacle and I will have to take this into consideration before making any choices.

I provide to you my files; with exhaxe #1 the bitrate does not change substantially from 16 to 24 kHz while with exhale #2 it does not change from 16 to 48kHz and even at 24kHz we obtain bitrates lower than 16kHz. I remember that Opus also doesn't like 16kHz sampled files, but this shows the need to reconsider some choices made for the encoder.

Thanks again and I will come back to write more as soon as I have time.

Christian

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #129
a serious question. How stereo works in Usac or in exhale? Is there joint stereo at certain bitrate, or stereo like opus that uses very few kbps like 2 kbps, or normal stereo so 32+32 kbps vbr, 32 kbps if the track is mono or 64 kbps stereo. I haven't test much the program so I don't know very well what are the bitrates for mono.
Celona, how to install usac in afconvert. How much it costs?

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #130
How stereo works in Usac or in exhale?

For now exhale doubles the bitrate when input has a stereo file, in a similar way to uncompressed files.

I have used afconvert only to create the needed wav files to be compressed later by exhale and I did a test to see how the bitrate changes, not to evaluate the sound quality, in fact the original file is an already compressed mp3.

With the first step afconvert creates an uncompressed intermediate file containing a 32 bit little endian floating point linear PCM audio, so as not to have clipping and to obtain the best performance with the encoders. This time we will get a stereo file.

afconvert /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.mp3 -d LEF32 -c 2 -f caff --soundcheck-generate --anchor-generate --src-complexity bats -r 127 /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.caf

With the second step, the input file ends up in the WAVE container with some additional information.

afconvert /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.caf -d LEF32 -f WAVE --soundcheck-read /Users/ufficio/Downloads/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48-44kHz-stereo.wav

The result compared to the previous test is:
1 ch, 44100 Hz, lpcm, 1.411.200 bps - 135.389.628 byte
2 ch, 44100 Hz, lpcm, 2.822.400 bps - 270.775.160 byte

where the second file (stereo) divided by the first file (mono) = 2 exactly.

Now in the end we get the two files compressed with exhale #2.

1 ch, 44.100 Hz, usac, 41.397 bps - 4.107.824 byte
2 ch, 44.100 Hz, usac, 73.563 bps - 7.194.052 byte

where the second file (stereo) divided by the first file (mono) = 1,75 approx.

Celona, how to install usac in afconvert. How much it costs?

At the moment afconvert can only decode the USAC audio and there is no ability of obtaining the encoder from Apple even for a fee.


Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #132
Thanks very much, m14u! For sampling rates between 22.05 and 44.1 kHz, the resulting bit-rates seem to be quite balanced now, so I think I can stop adjusting here. For lower sampling rates, see the following answer.

Hello Christian (celona), thanks very much for telling me about your interesting use case and for testing low input sampling rates.
...those who make information or who keep the sessions of parliaments the conservation of audio recordings...1 ch,  8.000 Hz, aac, 17.662 bps - 1.728.129 byte
Later I created the tracks with exhale #1 and the quality obtained is superior to my expectations.
1 ch,  8.000 Hz, usac, 18.123 bps - 1.767.687 byte
...
In conclusion, although exhale offers a much better quality, but in terms of bitrate it is still superior to first 8kHz AAC, so there is room for further improvements.
...
I provide to you my files; with exhaxe #1 the bitrate does not change substantially from 16 to 24 kHz while with exhale #2 it does not change from 16 to 48kHz and even at 24kHz we obtain bitrates lower than 16kHz.
The behavior you described in the last sentence was actually intentional, I tried to make the resulting bit-rate somewhat more independent of the input sampling rate when going below 22.05 kHz. But given your very interesting use case where, if I understand correctly, low data rate is more important than highest quality (especially since the source audio is usually pre-compressed), I removed the respective code in a new Git commit. If you try again at sampling rates smaller than 22.05 kHz, you should now get slightly lower bit-rates. But please understand this: the USAC/xHE-AAC standard provides a dedicated speech coding method (ACELP) which exhale does not implement, see also this previous post of mine. An xHE-AAC encoder supporting coding in this mode will sound much better than exhale and will also be able to run at 32 kHz or more even at the lowest bit-rates. AFAIK there are commercial encoders available which support this configuration.

a serious question. How stereo works in Usac or in exhale? Is there joint stereo at certain bitrate, or stereo like opus that uses very few kbps like 2 kbps, or normal stereo so 32+32 kbps vbr, 32 kbps if the track is mono or 64 kbps stereo.
How about this: you answer the question I asked you earlier (may I ask for what application would you like to use exhale at bit-rates below 64 kbit/s stereo? Audio books?) and I'll answer yours :)

Chris
If I don't reply to your reply, it means I agree with you.

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #133
v.1.0.3-41751381 built on 18-05-2020
I meant the quality is good at 80 kbps but for example at 79 kbps or mode 1, it isn't very good, it sounds muffled because isn't very optimized, for example I tested a track of muse, dig down, the one with kitara instrument and the bass part is too compressed, 52 kbps that is very low. So not audiobooks, maybe compilation music. Now I understand why less than 64 kbps stereo isn't optimal.

Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #134
v.1.0.3-41751381 built on 18-05-2020
I meant the quality is good at 80 kbps but for example at 79 kbps or mode 1, it isn't very good, it sounds muffled because isn't very optimized

mode 1 is near 60…64 kbps on average. It's also resampled at 24000 Hz that's why output sounds muffled. If I understand correctly, there are some advanced coding tools (like SBR) that are not (yet?) implemented in exhale. For these reasons (resampling + missing tools) exhale can't really compete now at ~64 kbps against Opus or HE-AAC (which both offers the immediate satisfaction of high frequencies).

Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #135
no, now it works at 32000 hz which can be a bit better. Ok thanks for your answer. I know opus recreates frequencies from sub bands and stereo from the frequencies but I'm not deeply interested to compare the two codecs. People like opus even at 48 kbps.
Maybe what you mean is that encoding with an encoder, the file is resampled another time. from 32000 hz wav to 32000 hz exhale.

Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #136
Thanks for the clarification. I think I understand what you mean now, though I'm still not sure where you got the number "79" from. CVBR mode 1 should average at 64 kbit/s. But indeed, mode 1 can now be used with 32 kHz sampling rate (since, from the first results of the 32-vs-44.1 kHz test with mode 2, I guess some users may prefer 32 over 24 kHz with mode 1). But guruboolez is right, exhale doesn't have SBR, and I'm not sure if/when I'll be able to implement that (it's a lot of extra work).

Regarding stereo:
a serious question. How stereo works in Usac or in exhale? Is there joint stereo at certain bitrate, or stereo like opus that uses very few kbps like 2 kbps, or normal stereo so 32+32 kbps vbr, 32 kbps if the track is mono or 64 kbps stereo.
None of the above ;) Well, there is a bit of stereo image narrowing at CVBR modes 4 and lower (to save bits which are better spent elsewhere), but overall, the joint stereo coding method is highly input adaptive - it uses just as many bits as necessary to increase the overall quality, at any bit-rate. celona gave some numbers above. So, no fixed bit-rate assigment to the left and right channel or something like that.

Chris
If I don't reply to your reply, it means I agree with you.

Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #137
Indeed, I forgot that in latest builds 32KHz is now possible for mode 1. It should be less muffled than 24 KHz.

Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #138
a serious question. How stereo works in Usac or in exhale? Is there joint stereo at certain bitrate, or stereo like opus that uses very few kbps like 2 kbps, or normal stereo so 32+32 kbps vbr, 32 kbps if the track is mono or 64 kbps stereo. I haven't test much the program so I don't know very well what are the bitrates for mono.
Celona, how to install usac in afconvert. How much it costs?

I'm not sure where You got this "2 kbps" stereo. Even HE-AACv2's parametric stereo is 3 kbps but low frequency range of both channels is still coded at much higher bitrate. There is no such thing as "stereo @2 kbps" for any codec. 
 All encoders LC-AAC, exhale and Opus have similar implementations of  joint stereo and intensity stereo.   Also You mention 64 kpbs range,  it's worth to mention that ...  Opus is still the best publicly available encoder at @64 kbps and it has no any critic flaw or whatsoever on stereo image. Even at 32 kbps  Opus still codes stereo with higher quality than any other publicly available codec.
You had already clear explanation how lossy encoder works.  https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php?topic=117721.msg972091#msg972091

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #139
Sorry, today I am very busy with my job. C.R. Helmrich asked me for further tests, which I will not be able to comment on today.

Previous tests were made with other encoders from file:
https://pod.radiopopolare.it/metroregione_20_05_2020_19_48.mp3

1 ch, 8.000 Hz, samr, 12.796 bps - 1.228.006 byte
1 ch, 8.000 Hz, Qclp, 14.000 bps - 1.347.222 byte
1 ch, 8.000 Hz, aac, 17.662 bps - 1.728.129 byte

Previous tests were made on macOS with exhale@90b8af55 #1 and #2 from the same file

1 ch, 8.000 Hz, usac, 18.123 bps - 1.767.687 byte
1 ch, 11.025 Hz, usac, 23.228 bps - 2.266.293 byte
1 ch, 12.000 Hz, usac, 25.062 bps - 2.445.115 byte
1 ch, 16.000 Hz, usac, 32.162 bps - 3.138.174 byte
1 ch, 22.050 Hz, usac, 34.301 bps - 3.361.215 byte
1 ch, 24.000 Hz, usac, 34.163 bps - 3.353.821 byte
1 ch, 32.000 Hz, usac, 34.958 bps - 3.453.941 byte

1 ch, 44.100 Hz, usac, 41.397 bps - 4.107.824 byte
1 ch, 48.000 Hz, usac, 41.511 bps - 4.130.556 byte

Newer tests were made on macOS with exhale@a8511608 #1 and #2 from the same file

1 ch, 8.000 Hz, usac, 15.899 bps - 1.554.165 byte
1 ch, 11.025 Hz, usac, 20.356 bps - 1.990.647 byte
1 ch, 12.000 Hz, usac, 21.963 bps - 2.147.755 byte
1 ch, 16.000 Hz, usac, 28.141 bps - 2.752.371 byte
1 ch, 22.050 Hz, usac, 34.301 bps - 3.361.215 byte
1 ch, 24.000 Hz, usac, 34.163 bps - 3.353.821 byte
1 ch, 32.000 Hz, usac, 34.958 bps - 3.453.941 byte

1 ch, 44.100 Hz, usac, 41.397 bps - 4.107.824 byte
1 ch, 48.000 Hz, usac, 41.511 bps - 4.130.556 byte

 

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #140
I prefer m4a to vorbis, even if opus developer said that opus uses a better technology than sbr.

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #141
Now to have exhale benefits (even if there aren't very high frequencies) I suggest preset 6 144 kbps.
yes opus focus much on high frequencies.
If you try with foobar a new build like these new one https://jeremylee.sh/bin.html  even at 26 kbps it tries to preserve high frequencies.
It is difficult to hear differences between two codecs.
Sorry to all, I'm too off topic, i can't delete the post.

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #142
I have created two sets of files, one mono and one stereo, for testing Exhale and other encoders in the case of the human voice only.

Each file contains at different sampling frequencies, obtained from the same SRC, in 4 part, a male voice with background music and a female voice from files 11 and 12 of your set, a very short sound, and the voice of a soprano from the EBU tests.

The name of each file begins with spoken followed by m for mono audio or s for stereo audio and ends with the sampling frequency in kHz.

The length of each piece is deliberately one minute.

I have already converted the files in many ways which will give you in subsequent posts to get around the forum limit of 16.

8 kHz mono|8 kHz stereo
12 kHz mono|12 kHz stereo
16 kHz mono|16 kHz stereo
24 kHz mono|24 kHz stereo
32 kHz mono|32 kHz stereo
48 kHz mono|48 kHz stereo

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #143
I will start with some particular formats. Since I want to test the effectiveness and quality of the encoders I do not limit the bitrate in any case.

The AMR format can also be used as audio for movies, even on YouTube, even if the NB quality today is hardly acceptable. It can also be reproduced from the first 3G phones, also with extensions .3gp, .3ga, or .3g2. It cannot be used with the HTML audio tag, despite the support of all operating systems.

AMR-NB - 8 kHz mono - 96.038 byte

AMR-WB - 16 kHz mono - 183.009 byte

Speex today, probably has no reason to exist, it cannot be used with the HTML audio tag, and nobody can use it with the commonly supplied codecs.

Speex - 8 kHz mono - 118.811 byte

Speex - 16 kHz mono - 214.811 byte

The following files compressed with Opus are in a CAF container and are provided for those who use Apple operating systems that are able of coding and decoding natively in Opus, limited to CELP, they do not use SILK for speech. The quality is valid, but decreasing the bitrate the voices become shaky. Apple's macOS does not allow creating Opus files sampled at 32 kHz, but as we will see later it is a condition that often does not make sense even with Exhale.

The detection between speech and music is automatic, but when SILK is missing it is always music. Using the CAF container with products other than Apple is possible but not within everyone's reach.

Opus - 8 kHz mono - 125.111 byte

Opus - 12 kHz mono - 152.936 byte

Opus - 16 kHz mono - 180.917 byte

Opus - 24 kHz mono - 241.385 byte

Opus - 48 kHz mono - 423.360 byte

To finish we have Opus in an ISO container, but it can only be used by FFMPEG based products. In this case the file size is reduced because FFMPEG allows you to set the optimization for VOIP.

Opus - 48 kHz mono - 363.901 byte

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #144
Now with Opus, this time divided by --music and --speech optimization.

Opus --music - 8 kHz mono - 281.277 byte

Opus --music - 12 kHz mono - 308.396 byte

Opus --music - 16 kHz mono - 380.725 byte

Opus --music - 24 kHz mono - 365.539 byte

Opus --music - 32 kHz mono - 412.990 byte

Opus --music - 48 kHz mono - 529.854 byte

Opus --speech - 8 kHz mono - 194.194 byte

Opus --speech - 12 kHz mono - 221.215 byte

Opus --speech - 16 kHz mono - 251.974 byte

Opus --speech - 24 kHz mono - 308.009 byte

Opus --speech - 32 kHz mono - 361.494 byte

Opus --speech - 48 kHz mono - 529.854 byte

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #145
Now the different AAC encoders without SBR.

AAC - 8 kHz mono - 130.222 byte

AAC - 12 kHz mono - 165.189 byte

AAC - 16 kHz mono - 194.513 byte

AAC - 24 kHz mono - 260.545 byte

AAC - 32 kHz mono - 390.844 byte

AAC - 48 kHz mono - 516.253 byte

AAC-LD - 16 kHz mono - 195.989 byte

AAC-LD - 24 kHz mono - 261.083 byte

AAC-LD - 32 kHz mono - 386.941 byte

AAC-LD - 48 kHz mono - 530.478 byte

AAC-ELD - 16 kHz mono - 196.455 byte

AAC-ELD - 24 kHz mono - 259.128 byte

AAC-ELD - 32 kHz mono - 385.691 byte

AAC-ELD - 48 kHz mono - 525.075 byte

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #146
Now the different AAC encoders with SBR and LD-SBR.

All MPEG encoders when used at insufficient bitrates produce annoying and unheard voices. I should have already written it in the previous block that from this point of view we must consider AAC-ELD encoders as a new and different generation of encoders that has clear advantages in human voices. Another advantage comes from the fact that AAC-ELD offers excellent compatibility and can be reproduced by obsolete operating systems, such as Android 4.2 or Mac OS X 10.7 Lion. In addition, this encoder can be used in videos that use the ISO container, even if YouTube does not yet support it to avoid having to pay royalties. Even with browsers like Firefox, it is possible to use the HTML audio tag, because the support is given by the operating system; AAC-ELD allows you to keep the audio in one format, for any use and this is a considerable advantage.

AAC-HE SBR - 16 kHz mono - 195.604 byte

AAC-HE SBR - 24 kHz mono - 196.417 byte

AAC-HE SBR - 32 kHz mono - 226.244 byte

AAC-HE SBR - 48 kHz mono - 257.456 byte

In the above case it is clear that it makes no sense to use AAC-HE with sampling frequencies below 24 kHz.

AAC-ELD LD-SBR - 16 kHz mono - 188.817 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR - 24 kHz mono - 258.762 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR - 32 kHz mono - 327.187 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR - 48 kHz mono - 408.953 byte

I wanted to insert the voice of a soprano in the test not only to cover the entire extension of the human voice, but also because it is the one that lends itself best to show the disasters that LD-SBR can do with music, especially with samples from 48 at 32 kHz. AAC-LD with LD-SBR is an excellent choice for conferences, long debates by voice, both in video and in audio only, but it is not a format suitable for music. At lower sampling rates the problem is not evident.

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #147
Now, to finish, the AAC-xHE or USAC created with the Exhale encoder.

The encoder allows you to use all the test sampling frequencies (even 44.1kHz that I have excluded) and for the frequencies lower than 32kHz the Exhale 1 encoder setting has been chosen.

AAC-xHE USAC - 8 kHz mono - 121.890 byte

AAC-xHE USAC - 12 kHz mono - 167.985 byte

AAC-xHE USAC - 16 kHz mono - 224.140 byte

AAC-xHE USAC - 24 kHz mono - 230.070 byte

For frequencies equal to or greater than 32kHz, not being able to do otherwise, the setting of the Exhale 2 encoder was chosen. In this case it can be noted that it makes no sense to use USAC with a sampling frequency of 16kHz because the size obtained is almost identical to 24kHz sampling.

AAC-xHE USAC - 32 kHz mono - 306.581 byte

AAC-xHE USAC - 48 kHz mono - 304.017 byte

Also in this case it can be noted that it makes no sense to use USAC with a sampling frequency lower than 48kHz because the size obtained at 32kHz sampling is even greater. Compared to AAC-ELD with LD-SBR, sampling frequencies greater than or equal to 32kHz do not decline in quality. Before the conclusions it will be necessary to verify the encoders also with stereophonic signals.

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #148
opus not only at 26, even at 43 kbps has good quality

Re: Re: exhale - Open Source xHE-AAC encoder

Reply #149
Probably nobody cares about it. For a limited period of time it will be possible to ask for the files.

Stereo8 kHz12 kHz16 kHz24 kHz32 kHz48 kHzEncoder
AAC-LC258 kB325 kB392 kB502 kB749 kB1024 kBafconvert
AAC-LD318 kB339 kB362 kB504 kB726 kB1024 kBafconvert
AAC-ELD319 kB336 kB360 kB503 kB726 kB1024 kBafconvert
AAC-ELD LD-SBR326 kB346 kB355 kB474 kB629 kB765 kBafconvert
AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS240 kB248 kB254 kB267 kB383 kB369 kBafconvert
AAC-HE SBR384 kB386 kB386 kB392 kB446 kB509 kBafconvert
AAC-HE SBR PS303 kB314 kB327 kB324 kB326 kB395 kBafconvert
AAC-xHE USAC269 kB383 kB528 kB656 kB740 kB706 kBexhale # (commit a8511608)
Ogg Vorbis196 kB280 kB307 kB401 kB685 kB737 kBoggenc
Opus --music447 kB490 kB604 kB552 kB600 kB750 kBopusenc
Opus --speech285 kB327 kB466 kB551 kB600 kB750 kBopusenc
Wave (original)1.9 MB2.9 MB3.8 MB5.8 MB7.7 MB11.5 MBffmpeg

Ogg Vorbis - 8 kHz stereo - 196.496 byte

AAC-HE SBR PS - 32 kHz - 326.220 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS - 8 kHz - 240.307 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS - 12 kHz - 247.733 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS - 16 kHz - 254.144 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS - 24 kHz - 266.693 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS - 32 kHz - 383.063 byte

AAC-ELD LD-SBR PS - 48 kHz - 369.473 byte

 
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