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Topic: LAME conversion to MP3 (Read 1077 times) previous topic - next topic
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LAME conversion to MP3

This message follows on from a previous message to this forum. I need confirmation that I have used the right parameters saving to MP3, and that the audio quality of the MP3 file is as good as that of the WAV file.

This message pertains to;   http://c-compiler.com/myfiles/a-mp3.zip

The original WAV is at;  x.wav

I have converted this file to MP3.  Please listen to;   x.mp3

According to Windows Media Player, the bit rate of the source file is 192 Kbps, see "windows-media-player.jpg"

According to VLC, the source file has sample rate 48,000 Hz and bits per sample 16. This particular codec (IMA WAV ADPCM Audio) actually has 4 bits per sample, but this is decompressed to 16 bits per sample. See "vlc.jpg".

According to MediaInfo, the source file has sample rate 48,000 Hz and bit rate 192 kb/s, with a bit depth of 4 bits (which is decompressed to 16 bits, as noted above), see "mediainfo.jpg".

According to Total Recorder, the source file has sample rate 48,000 Hz and bit depth 4 bits, see "totalrecorder.jpg".

I use the LAME encoder with Total Recorder to convert the WAV to MP3, see "totalrecorderA.jpg".

The media format in Total Recorder specifies sample rate 48,000 Hz and bit rate 192. This is in keeping with the parameters for the source WAV file, see "totalrecorderB.jpg".

Finally, opening the new MP3 file (converted from WAV) gives the screen shown in "totalrecorderC.jpg". Bit rate for the MP3 is 192 kbit/s and sample rate is 48,000 Hz.


There are essentially two questions I need to ask.

(1) I have used the parameters for the source WAV file when creating the MP3 file. Is this a sensible approach? Audio quality is top priority.

(2) Please tell me if the audio in the MP3 file is as clear as with the WAV. I think it is, but I would like to be re-assured.

The words on the recording are, "people like that should be .... I know, they should be homeless".

Thank you for responses.

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #1
1. No, i would not recommend converting this way because the original file is better quality (in theory), while the filesize/bitrate is the same. The thing is that you ALWAYS lose some quality when encoding to a lossy format, so the original wav file is better.
2. You probably cannot hear the difference at this very high bitrate. 192kbps mp3 for mono sound is an overkill.

My question to you is: why do you want to convert to mp3? If you need mp3 for compatibility reasons, then i can understand.

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #2
P.s. Usually wav contains PCM which is a lossless format. HOWEVER your wav is encoded with ADPCM which is a lossy format.

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #3
1. No, i would not recommend converting this way because the original file is better quality (in theory), while the filesize/bitrate is the same. The thing is that you ALWAYS lose some quality when encoding to a lossy format, so the original wav file is better.
2. You probably cannot hear the difference at this very high bitrate. 192kbps mp3 for mono sound is an overkill.

My question to you is: why do you want to convert to mp3? If you need mp3 for compatibility reasons, then i can understand.

Yes, I want MP3 so it can be embedded in an HTML page. That doesn't work for a WAV.

In practice, the audio quality seems similar from the source WAV to the destination MP3. Having listened to both the WAV and the MP3, would you agree that there is little or no difference in quality between the two?

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #4
"In practice, the audio quality seems similar from the source WAV to the destination MP3. Having listened to both the WAV and the MP3, would you agree that there is little or no difference in quality between the two?"

267 people have  read this thread, and only one has replied.

Could one or two people offer an opinion as to whether the source WAV file and target MP3 file sound the same to an average listener? The files are 4 seconds each in duration, so it isn't too much work.

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #5
Could one or two people offer an opinion as to whether the source WAV file and target MP3 file sound the same to an average listener? The files are 4 seconds each in duration, so it isn't too much work.

I am not sure how people could tell if there was any difference between the files when, A:  its only 4 seconds, & B: its sounds poor quality to begin with. Also if its for a HTML page does it really matter. (Most laptops & tablets have poor sound).

Also as pointed out by Mark7 already your wav file is not a lossless file.


Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #6
Could one or two people offer an opinion as to whether the source WAV file and target MP3 file sound the same to an average listener? The files are 4 seconds each in duration, so it isn't too much work.
Taking the really horrible quality of your ADPCM WAV, the included MP3 does sound the same. Even the spectrum looks the same because of the very high bitrate.

 

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #7
The sample rate does influence on specter of audio . If you compress the WAV or lossless format to lossy format using very high compress rates, the compressing algorithm cuts "unusless" information on high friquencies, and (if you sensable to detect this) it will cause degrade of high end of music or voice.  ;)

Re: LAME conversion to MP3

Reply #8
The sample rate does influence on specter of audio . If you compress the WAV or lossless format to lossy format using very high compress rates, the compressing algorithm cuts "unusless" information on high friquencies, and (if you sensable to detect this) it will cause degrade of high end of music or voice.  ;)
I'm sorry, but nobody should heed this advice without first testing in a verifiable double blind manner (ABX test, etc) whether this even applies to them. Unless you use even the strongest settings with most modern lossy codecs, the compression artifacts are supposed to be inaudible to most listeners.

The only suggestion I have is to always rip your CDs to a lossless format such as FLAC or WavPack, so you may freely convert the files to any lossy format you want in the future, and not have to rip your collection again to do so.

 
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