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Topic: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry (Read 148642 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #25

I just want to rip the CD layer.  In theory, it should be the same master as the SACD layer,

Unfortunately that theory is not always true.    Famous case in point, Dark Side of the Moon.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #26
Care to elaborate?  What happened with Dark Side of the Moon SACD?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #27
Not sure about that specific disk, but different mastering between the formats on DVDA/SACD does happen.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #28
Not sure about that specific disk, but different mastering between the formats on DVDA/SACD does happen.

Oh, that I am sure of.

And I can also believe that some unscrupulous record label will include a different master on the SACD layer vs the CD layer of an SACD to convince you that the SACD sounds better.

I'm just curious about some examples in the wild of this.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #29
And I can also believe that some unscrupulous record label will include a different master on the SACD layer vs the CD layer of an SACD to convince you that the SACD sounds better.
Cough, cough, *MQA*, cough, cough
Loudspeaker manufacturer

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #30
And I can also believe that some unscrupulous record label will include a different master on the SACD layer vs the CD layer of an SACD to convince you that the SACD sounds better.
Cough, cough, *MQA*, cough, cough

You mean that lossy compression method that audiophiles somehow believe is the ONLY loss compression on the planet that sounds better than the lossless original?

If Stereophile magazine says it's true, it must be true.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #31
You mean that lossy compression method that audiophiles somehow believe is the ONLY loss compression on the planet that sounds better than the lossless original?
Remastering can, maybe, possibly, be beneficial...
Loudspeaker manufacturer

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #32
How does mastering for lossy compression actually work?
I.e. with a lossy compressor down the line. Do they simply filter such that artefacts are less likely?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #33
Quote
How does mastering for lossy compression actually work?
I've never heard of that, but it would depend on the mastering engineer (or the mastering engineer's client).     It's the encoder's job to optimize the compression of whatever you feed it.    

It would be a bad idea to compromise sound quality to get "better compression".    Similarly, it's usually a bad idea to "tweak" your LAME settings....   The developers have already put-in a lot of effort to optimize the default settings for the best overall compromise.

I believe the lossy version is usually the same as the CD version.    "High resolution" releases may  have less compression.   The vinyl master may  have some additional filtering to remove the very-low frequencies, and to make sure the low frequencies are mono, etc.

Apple recommends a high-quality high-resolution master for iTunes (AAC).

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #34
Sure looks like this topic got lost in the weeds.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #35
Care to elaborate?  What happened with Dark Side of the Moon SACD?

CD side was mastered with more compression than the DSD stereo. 

https://www.stereophile.com/news/11649/index.html

They come from the same *master tapes*, if that's what you meant.  But the *mastering for disc* varied by final digital format (PCM vs DSD). 


Quote
And I can also believe that some unscrupulous record label will include a different master on the SACD layer vs the CD layer of an SACD to convince you that the SACD sounds better.

ahem

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #36
Btw another vinyl myth that could probably use busting is 'if you clean an LP with an alcohol solution, you will *remove its protective coating*'.

what 'protective coating' would that be?


Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #37
Btw another vinyl myth that could probably use busting is 'if you clean an LP with an alcohol solution, you will *remove its protective coating*'.

what 'protective coating' would that be?

I definitely have to call bullshit on that myth as well as I've actually cleaned a record that way.  Probably started by some company that sells LP cleaner.  Vinyl is a very tough plastic, so there is zero need to have a protective coating on it.  Although I wish CDs had the coating Blu-Rays have after seeing how some people mishandle them.  I'm not the type of person that abuses their stuff but I'm not exactly trusting of letting others handle or touch my things.

 

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #38
Btw another vinyl myth that could probably use busting is 'if you clean an LP with an alcohol solution, you will *remove its protective coating*'.

what 'protective coating' would that be?

I definitely have to call bullshit on that myth as well as I've actually cleaned a record that way.  Probably started by some company that sells LP cleaner.  Vinyl is a very tough plastic, so there is zero need to have a protective coating on it.  Although I wish CDs had the coating Blu-Rays have after seeing how some people mishandle them.  I'm not the type of person that abuses their stuff but I'm not exactly trusting of letting others handle or touch my things.

... here's a currently online example of this:

"The most contentious of the lot and one that will have a few readers and some hi-fi journalists up in arms is pure, isopropyl alcohol (as opposed to the remnants of your last vodka and tonic). This stuff can be disastrous for vinyl. The problem is, it also lies within many commercial record cleaning products, so look carefully at the ingredients before you use them. Pure alcohol strips away much of the rubbish and gunge from grooves – which is great – but it also removes the protective coating that rests on the groove walls/floor. I don’t mean the oft talked about ‘release agent’ that a record pressing plant utilises and is often left to bung up vinyl grooves, either. Once that essential protective layer is gone, music sounds harsh and brittle. I’ve done a series of sound tests to prove this phenomenon. Initially, alcohol-cleaned records sound great. After the third or fourth clean, they sound terrible. By then, though, it’s too late and your record has been irretrievably scarred." ~ https://thevinylfactory.com/features/8-easy-and-affordable-ways-to-clean-your-vinyl-records-by-hand/
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?  ;~)

 
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