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SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1
“a designed to digitally remove pops and clicks from any record in real-time. playing older records like they’re brand new”

SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Only £1,555 for pleasure of no pops and clicks ;D
If it works.

Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #1
I remember something like that from the "vinyl days".   I never actually saw one and I don't know how it worked, but there was a delay involved.   Probably a bucket brigade delay rather than A/D and D/A conversion.  And, I don't remember if it just muted the click or if it replaced it with the just-preceding or just-following sound.   And, it must have been out of my price range because I never considered buying one.

Quote
Only £1,555 for pleasure of no pops and clicks ;D
The price probably isn't out-of-line,  if you need such a thing...    It's expensive to design, manufacturer, market, and distribute in small quantities.    Plus, you don't want to sell it too cheap!   Audiophiles don't like cheap stuff...    The more it costs the more they want it!    (And, I assume this is for audiophiles.)

I'd probably pay that if we didn't have digital!     I spent a lot of money replacing my records with CDs for the same reason...  So I didn't have to listen to record noise.

 


Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #2
SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1
“a designed to digitally remove pops and clicks from any record in real-time. playing older records like they’re brand new”
Since it operates in realtime, there is no way the algorithm(s) applied can be as sophisticated as those available in a host of other non-realtime restoration products. (Well, not unless SweetVinyl have discovered some extraordinary approach that has eluded dozens of other restoration engineers over the last couple of decades).

In any case, it admits to working in the digital domain, so that'll put off the hardened vinylphiles.

Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #3
To the fool who decided to put something up for sale...

TOS Hydrogenaudio Terms of Service

[...]

TOS 14. All members must refrain from using the forum solely for advertising purposes.
-> 14.

[...]

Lastly, this forum is no marketplace. Please don't put things up for sale here.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #4
I wasn't trying to "sell" anything to anyone here and I thought that was quite clear if you read my whole post in context.  I'd be shocked if anyone here was remotely interested in such a device, especially since if I understand correctly, this thread is sort of ridiculing these things.  I was providing an example in response to DVD Doug and I used that link because I'm lazy.  Sorry if I've stepped on any toes.

For those that want to know, the SAE 5000 was an analog-only device with a bucket-brigade delay line that purported to "substitute" a snippet of audio immediately after a click was detected by momentarily bypassing the line.  Or something like that.  I used one back in the 80's.  It turns out that the delay line is only 100 microseconds long, so the amount of substitution would be pretty limited.  I think that was the sales pitch and in actuality it did more limiting and muting than anything else.


Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #5
Would not a Laser turntable do much the same thing?

remove pops and clicks from records in real-time.

& in the year 2018, why are there no cheap Laser turntables?

I remember them from the early 1980's, they were going to be one of the next big audio things.
But they were expensive (very) at the time.


Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #6
Quote
Would not a Laser turntable do much the same thing?

I never saw one, so I don't know what their capabilities were.  However, my very nice, very good Technics linear tracker turntable (with upgraded linear contact stylus) was generally sneered at by the audiophiles of the time, despite specs superior to almost anything  else at the time.  Even then, they were all convinced that belt drive, heavy platters, granite plinths, expensive tonearms and endless fidgeting with them, etc were all a necessary part of obtaining that perfect sound.  The rest of us bought CDs.  So I would guess that regardless of it's performance, the laser turntable would have been a flop in either segment of the market.

Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #7
Would not a Laser turntable do much the same thing?
remove pops and clicks from records in real-time.
The ELP laser turntable was, if anything, MORE susceptible to surface noise. Where a mechanical stylus would plough through small dust particles, the laser would faithfully read them as signal. So LPs had to be scrupulously clean to work on a laser turntable.

& in the year 2018, why are there no cheap Laser turntables?
Probably for similar reasons that there are no cheap traction engines?

Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #8

Since it operates in realtime, there is no way the algorithm(s) applied can be as sophisticated as those available in a host of other non-realtime restoration products. (Well, not unless SweetVinyl have discovered some extraordinary approach that has eluded dozens of other restoration engineers over the last couple of decades).

In any case, it admits to working in the digital domain, so that'll put off the hardened vinylphiles.

I'm not sure it works in real time - I haven't read specs, but I expect it to have at least half second delay.

Re: SweetVinyl SugarCube SC-1

Reply #9
Would not a Laser turntable do much the same thing?
remove pops and clicks from records in real-time.
The ELP laser turntable was, if anything, MORE susceptible to surface noise. Where a mechanical stylus would plough through small dust particles, the laser would faithfully read them as signal. So LPs had to be scrupulously clean to work on a laser turntable.

& in the year 2018, why are there no cheap Laser turntables?
Probably for similar reasons that there are no cheap traction engines?

I can vouch for that! I owned an ELP turntable and spent more time cleaning records than playing them.  It was a real pita, so I sold the turntable at a substantial loss a year later.  The sound quality, while good, did not scale with its price either.

The ELP did have its good points though - old, worn records sounded great.  The laser would track far deeper into the groove than a mechanical stylus.  Providing the record was clinically clean, there were far fewer pops and clicks too.  The other plus is that the LP does not wear from each playback.

 
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