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Topic: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network (Read 359 times) previous topic - next topic
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playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Hello,
I am not sure this part of the forum is the correct one to post the question, however I try and apologies if its wrong.

I have been using EaC to rip my CDs for ages, I think I started in 2006 ripping them to FLAC files to be played by a Squeezebox.
As a result many of my CD rips are now 12 years old.

Yesterday I was trying to figure out why some albums I now play on a Denon DNP-730AE (a DLNA HiFi player) with the help of HiFicast, an android application working as DLNA control point, have such a behaviour:

- If I play an album ripped many years ago by EaC, the player does not automatically advance the tracks.
- If I rip again the same album by EaC, (standard options) then the player works fine, automatically advancing the tracks.

HiFicast has an option to "force" the tracks to advance, but I would prefer not to use it cause I'll loose the "gapless" mode.

I do not think I used any special way to rip the CDs many years ago, so I am wondering if somebody can try to explain to me the reason of such a behaviour.

Thanks a lot


Marco
Marco

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #1
and I have an update:

- It I convert the FLAC files ripped many years ago to WAV (with Foobar2000) conserving the tags and then back to FLAC....then they play automatically advancing the tracks. So it does not seem to be a problem with EaC but with FLAC.
Marco

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #2
Usually problems with FLAC files are caused by embedded artwork or nonstandard/variable block size. Do problematic files have embedded artwork?
About block size and other possible differences: you can use metaflac.exe --list filename.flac to see complete info about your FLAC files and find what is difference between old and new files.

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #3
Usually problems with FLAC files are caused by embedded artwork or nonstandard/variable block size. Do problematic files have embedded artwork?
About block size and other possible differences: you can use metaflac.exe --list filename.flac to see complete info about your FLAC files and find what is difference between old and new files.
I was about to post this. Android in general seems to experience serious issues in these areas, especially flacs with variable block size made with EAC's own flac encoder are completely unplayable on Android.

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #4
EAC uses its own flac encoder rather than than the very same executable available from the flac website? That's news to me.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

 

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #5
especially flacs with variable block size made with EAC's own flac encoder are completely unplayable on Android.
You probably mean CUETools and not EAC?

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #6
especially flacs with variable block size made with EAC's own flac encoder are completely unplayable on Android.
You probably mean CUETools and not EAC?
Oh you're right, I had something different in my mind and I mixed it up (had a similar issue with OP which made me switch to cuetools which seemed also to have issues), still though very similar problems happen with EAC too. Seems like dodgy things happen across flac implementations and tagging systems in general. I had similar issues with OP years ago but what seemed to fix it was removing artwork and re-encoding everything manually.

Re: playing FLAC files ripped by EaC in a DLNA network

Reply #7
Sigh.

EAC uses the flac command line executable with perfectly normal compression settings and tagging arguments by default. However, these settings are still user configurable, which is where problems will arise.  In other words, EAC can't save you from yourself.

"Dodgy" implementation?  Pfft.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

 
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