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How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

I'm looking to point some people to it, but I don't want to use it at a source if there's a constant battle with vinyl placebophiles to keep it accurate.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #1
It "looks true" to me and there are a lot of smart, scientific, minds around here.

Vinyl does sound different* from digital and if someone prefers the sound of vinyl then it truly sounds better to them and there's no point in arguing.

* That's assuming the same master...  If you digitize vinyl the digital copy can sound identical to the original analog (in a proper scientific-blind listening test).



Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #2
It was more or less ok last time I looked. I stopped policing it quite some time ago. You can view the edit history.  If you don’t recognize a user, check the contribution.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #3
“Many people prefer listening to music on vinyl rather than on CD or digital formats, a majority of those people do so because they honestly percieve the sound to be better. Better meaning; more natural, less artificial, more true to the original studio recording, more organic etc, even when unsupported by objective measurements of fidelity. For such people the statement that "vinyl sounds better than CD" is not a myth but a fact.

This is pretty ridiculous. Subjectivity is fine, but this is going too far. Reworded to say it is a fact that people believe fairies actually exist would be OK. This is with regards to the original to the studio recording portion, assuming these subjective terms are to be accepted.

I’m cool with the part above that isn’t in bold.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #4
Sigh....

It's so hard for anyone in the audio hobby to ever discuss anything objective.  They always throw around terms that can't be objectively measured, such as "detail" and "clarity."  Trying to find a good objective source with real world measurements that matter is very difficult.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #5
Such an old argument which will never be settled.

For me:

1. technical measurements will always show digital to be a more faithful reproduction than vinyl.
2. many people prefer vinyl to digital, as the technical fact that digital is more faithful to the original is not the end of it.

Those two statements aren't contradictory.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #6
Such an old argument which will never be settled.
For me:

1. technical measurements will always show digital to be a more faithful reproduction than vinyl.
2. many people prefer vinyl to digital, as the technical fact that digital is more faithful to the original is not the end of it.

Those two statements aren't contradictory.
3. No people have be able to demonstrate ability to distinguish vinyl vs "digital" version of said vinyl in any valid, controlled listening test.

Tests which are lots of fun to perform on vinylphile believers.
Loudspeaker manufacturer

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #7
Such an old argument which will never be settled.
For me:

1. technical measurements will always show digital to be a more faithful reproduction than vinyl.
2. many people prefer vinyl to digital, as the technical fact that digital is more faithful to the original is not the end of it.

Those two statements aren't contradictory.
3. No people have be able to demonstrate ability to distinguish vinyl vs "digital" version of said vinyl in any valid, controlled listening test.

Tests which are lots of fun to perform on vinylphile believers.

I don't think anyone says they can hear the difference between a vinyl and a high quality digital recording of a record? Vinyl fans would be wrong to say that they can, but that doesn't mean they're wrong for preferring playing a record over a FLAC.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #8
We’ve had our fair share of people claiming to distinguish analog from digital.

Subjective preference is still preference, even when it is baseless. However, It does no one any good for there to be a paragraph listing various subjective claims as to why people may have them.  Especially one that doesn’t explain the physiology.

Back to the original question, I did not identify any edits that contain misinformation since I last read the page.  I don’t think I was ever happy with the page, which to me seems poorly structured and somewhat directionless.  I also have a feeling that there are testable claims which ought to include citations but don’t have them.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #9
I don't think anyone says they can hear the difference between a vinyl and a high quality digital recording of a record?
I wasn't referring to a recording of vinyl, which might actually be detectable due to the variability of each play of a record. I meant a real time comparison, literally, of vinyl playback. Regardless, I suspect the vast majority of vinylphiles believe they could detect the difference, because they believe it is the "digital" that creates artifacts, "artificial", less orgasmic, etc, etc as stated in the moronic blathering on Wiki.
Heck, I've seen that kind of idiocy right here, much less on the believer forums where its practically all that.
Loudspeaker manufacturer

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #10
Why is that drivel even in there?

Some people prefer the sound of vinyl over CD for a variety of reasons, some of which aren’t rooted in an objective reality.  How’s that a myth?
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #11
Such an old argument which will never be settled.
For me:

1. technical measurements will always show digital to be a more faithful reproduction than vinyl.
2. many people prefer vinyl to digital, as the technical fact that digital is more faithful to the original is not the end of it.

Those two statements aren't contradictory.
3. No people have be able to demonstrate ability to distinguish vinyl vs "digital" version of said vinyl in any valid, controlled listening test.

Tests which are lots of fun to perform on vinylphile believers.

How is this possible.  The first pop or click you hear will instantly give it away.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #12
Why is that drivel even in there?

Some people prefer the sound of vinyl over CD for a variety of reasons, some of which aren’t rooted in an objective reality.  How’s that a myth?

A lot of it may just be nostalgia.  It's quite possible the digital release of an album might sound different.  For example, Hotel California by the Eagles was mastered by Ted Jensen for vinyl in the 70s.  Barry Diament remastered the album for CD for it's 1982 release.  I would think the two versions are not going to be identical.  People used to the vinyl release probably think it's better just because they're used to it.  Familiarity breeds content.  I'm sure people that grew up in the digital music era may prefer a CD release over vinyl for the very same reason.

It's all VERY subjective.  For a lot of people, they like what they know.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #13
 
Quote
How is this possible.  The first pop or click you hear will instantly give it away.
I believe we are talking about comparing the vinyl to a digitized copy of the vinyl which of course would include all of the vinyl noise and other vinyl defects and inaccuracies.

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #14
How is this possible.
TT/vinyl > Dual output phono pre >output 1> Input 1 preamp, output 2>ADC/DAC loop> Input 2 preamp. Match voltages>amp. Switch between inputs, or use an ABX box in lieu of preamp these days.

The first pop or click you hear will instantly give it away.
The "digital" click pops or the "analog" ones? None have done so this far.

**Nothing is recorded
Loudspeaker manufacturer

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #15
Why is that drivel even in there?

Some people prefer the sound of vinyl over CD for a variety of reasons, some of which aren’t rooted in an objective reality.  How’s that a myth?

A lot of it may just be nostalgia.  It's quite possible the digital release of an album might sound different.  For example, Hotel California by the Eagles was mastered by Ted Jensen for vinyl in the 70s.  Barry Diament remastered the album for CD for it's 1982 release.  I would think the two versions are not going to be identical.  People used to the vinyl release probably think it's better just because they're used to it.  Familiarity breeds content.  I'm sure people that grew up in the digital music era may prefer a CD release over vinyl for the very same reason.

It's all VERY subjective.  For a lot of people, they like what they know.
How does any of that qualify as a myth?
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #16
Why is that drivel even in there?

Some people prefer the sound of vinyl over CD for a variety of reasons, some of which aren’t rooted in an objective reality.  How’s that a myth?

A lot of it may just be nostalgia.  It's quite possible the digital release of an album might sound different.  For example, Hotel California by the Eagles was mastered by Ted Jensen for vinyl in the 70s.  Barry Diament remastered the album for CD for it's 1982 release.  I would think the two versions are not going to be identical.  People used to the vinyl release probably think it's better just because they're used to it.  Familiarity breeds content.  I'm sure people that grew up in the digital music era may prefer a CD release over vinyl for the very same reason.

It's all VERY subjective.  For a lot of people, they like what they know.
How does any of that qualify as a myth?

It doesn't qualify as a myth.  But if you edit the page, a vinylphile will just come along and put it back.

 

Re: How accurate is the Vinyl Myths wiki entry

Reply #17
With that in mind we should be happy there hasn’t been any recent vandalism.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

 
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