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Topic: Difference in DAC chips. (Read 1897 times) previous topic - next topic
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Difference in DAC chips.

I'm still looking for a small DAC for a headphone project. Almost all DAC's list the chip used. I.e, PCM2706, CS4398, PCM1795, etc. How much, if any, does the specific chip impact the sound quality and/or feature set. Do I need to be aware of which chipset I select?

Thanks all;
Artie

Re: Difference in DAC chips.

Reply #1
How much, if any, does the specific chip impact the sound quality
I'm not aware of any valid scientific data regarding this, if any exists, please share for review.
OTOH, knowledge of chipset brand and part numbers are know to cause much psychogenic melodrama amongst believers, so there's that.
I'd personally just pick the finished product with the features you need and see if there is any 3rd party objective validation that they didn't manage to muck up something so basic.
My 2c

cheers.

AJ
Loudspeaker manufacturer

Re: Difference in DAC chips.

Reply #2
Thanks AJ. That's what I suspected.

Btw, I'm just a little north of you in Jax.  Love this weather.  :)

Re: Difference in DAC chips.

Reply #3
Yes, though I was really looking forward to less than 80's in January!
I know of small headphone DACs like the ODAC that measure well and are (relatively) inexpensive, but I'm not a headphone guy, so there's probably plenty others.
Loudspeaker manufacturer

 

Re: Difference in DAC chips.

Reply #4
I'm still looking for a small DAC for a headphone project. Almost all DAC's list the chip used. I.e, PCM2706, CS4398, PCM1795, etc. How much, if any, does the specific chip impact the sound quality and/or feature set. Do I need to be aware of which chipset I select?
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It all depends.


When you are driving headphones, the source impedance provided to the headphones by the analog output stage is important, and if more than a few ohms can cause audible frequency response variations.

There are now some DAC chips that can be easily configured to add potentially audible frequency response variations, usually a high frequency roll-off.

 
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