Skip to main content

Topic: Equalizing headphones, with binaural microphones? (Read 299 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Equalizing headphones, with binaural microphones?
About 3 weeks ago I started experimenting with binaural microphones that are placed at the ear canal. Of course, these are meant to create binaural recordings to play back on headphones, however I found a second use for them. I posted what I did here: http://www.head-fi.org/t/829549/equalizing-headphones-to-your-ears-with-in-ear-binaural-microphones

Essentially, I took measurements of my headphones in order to get their frequency response using Room EQ Wizard. Then, I equalized their response to match a typical speaker target curve.

So, my question, is my little experiment here an effective way of EQing properly? The frequency response the microphones are picking up are right at the entrance of the ear canal, and I know many measurement dummy heads have microphones inside of the ear canal where the eardrum would be. What I'm hearing sounds pretty good with the headphones I have, but I would like feedback anyway.

  • DVDdoug
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: Equalizing headphones, with binaural microphones?
Reply #1
That's reasonable if the microphones are accurate and calibrated.    But, headphone measurements are a bit tricky and if the headphones are reasonably good I'd start with the assumption are about as good as the microphones.

Quote
So, my question, is my little experiment here an effective way of EQing properly?
I wouldn't EQ headphones unless you're not happy with the sound.   If you feel there's "something wrong", or if you just have a preference for more bass or more highs, etc., adjust by ear.

Quote
Then, I equalized their response to match a typical speaker target curve.
If you're not shooting for flatness/accuracy, why not just adjust to your taste?

Quote
What I'm hearing sounds pretty good with the headphones I have
If you're happy with the results that's the important thing.     I wouldn't worry too much about "accuracy" unless you are mixing/mastering binaural recordings.   And in that case, it's probably safer to just get a good pair of headphones for your "standard".    (And if you're mixing/mastering regular recordings, headphones shouldn't be your primary monitors anyway.)