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Topic: Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm? (Read 11357 times) previous topic - next topic
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Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #25
It sounds to me like you've set the tracking weight to the lowest possible amount, which is actually much worse than having the tracking weight too high.


Hmm, just curious: Why?

The stylus isn't firmly in the groove, and can move around too much, causing damage, especially on bass-heavy tracks or ones with sudden, violent sounds like the famous Telarc 1812 Overture (they used real cannon).

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #26
Just found a set-up video for this model, and the presenter says the recommended VTF is 2.5g!

A DJ cartridge, I suppose, optimised for durability and DJing heavy beats in a less-than-optimal situation, but that seems a lot.

Anyhoo, skip to about 10 minutes 30 in this clip and see if it helps you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l1CLC4Z2D4

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #27
Just found a set-up video for this model, and the presenter says the recommended VTF is 2.5g!

A DJ cartridge, I suppose, optimised for durability and DJing heavy beats in a less-than-optimal situation, but that seems a lot.


2.5g is on the high end of consumer cartridges, but on the low end of DJ cartridges, a lot of them go up to 4g or more. Another factor is that the stylus in question is conical, which can affect sound quality and increase playback wear on records, but is more robust and long-lived, and will stand up better to scratching.

That turntable+cartridge setup is definitely biased towards DJing applications.

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #28
Just found a set-up video for this model, and the presenter says the recommended VTF is 2.5g!

A DJ cartridge, I suppose, optimised for durability and DJing heavy beats in a less-than-optimal situation, but that seems a lot.


2.5g is on the high end of consumer cartridges, but on the low end of DJ cartridges, a lot of them go up to 4g or more. Another factor is that the stylus in question is conical, which can affect sound quality and increase playback wear on records.

That turntable+cartridge setup is definitely biased towards DJing applications.

Dual's home stereo-oriented turntables usually come with a cartridge from the Ortofon OM range (the pointy one), which are fairly inexpensive and have an easy-to-replace stylus for upgrades/replacing damaged units, should one feel the need. Might be worth considering, as they usually track at 1.5g or thereabouts.

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #29
Dual's home stereo-oriented turntables usually come with a cartridge from the Ortofon OM range (the pointy one), which are fairly inexpensive and have an easy-to-replace stylus for upgrades/replacing damaged units, should one feel the need. Might be worth considering, as they usually track at 1.5g or thereabouts.


That's exactly what I'm using, an OM-5E. Recommended tracking weight is 1.75g. It should cost around €50-60.

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #30
I, honestly, have no clue. The manual advised me to guess, so I did. I applied the force so that it won't press on the LP.



There are such things as stylus pressure gauges for the purpose of avoiding damage to the record with excess or inadequate tracking force.

Shure Stylus Force Gauge Link

Tacking force is critical enough to not leave to chance or procedures you may not understand or work as well as you hope.

 

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #31
There are such things as stylus pressure gauges for the purpose of avoiding damage to the record with excess or inadequate tracking force.

Shure Stylus Force Gauge Link

Tacking force is critical enough to not leave to chance or procedures you may not understand or work as well as you hope.


I use a 0.01g precision weight for this, since it was cheaper at the local uh... "freelance pharmacy supply store"  than the Shure gauge. Either will work fine, it's not like milligram precision matters.

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #32
There are such things as stylus pressure gauges for the purpose of avoiding damage to the record with excess or inadequate tracking force.

Shure Stylus Force Gauge Link

Tacking force is critical enough to not leave to chance or procedures you may not understand or work as well as you hope.


I use a 0.01g precision weight for this, since it was cheaper at the local uh... "freelance pharmacy supply store"  than the Shure gauge. Either will work fine, it's not like milligram precision matters.

There are a lot of inexpensive digital gauges sold in 'ahem' that sort of shop, which would be fine for the purpose. Look for the kind of corner shop that stocks a variety of extra-large filter papers and they will probably have a selection of these handy gadgets.

I bought one when I became tired of fiddling with a tiny balance beam gauge (my counterweight doesn't screw in or out, which makes for a fiddly experience in itself). A calibration weight is sometimes supplied with these gauges, which good for peace of mind.

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #33
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I bought one when I became tired of fiddling with a tiny balance beam gauge (my counterweight doesn't screw in or out, which makes for a fiddly experience in itself). A calibration weight is sometimes supplied with these gauges, which good for peace of mind.


I took a look at a number of ahem, Herb Scales online and found them at low as $6 postpaid (eBay).  Seems like something like this would be far easier to use.

Looks like the classic $20.00 Shure has been thoroughly obsolesced!

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #34
[
I bought one when I became tired of fiddling with a tiny balance beam gauge (my counterweight doesn't screw in or out, which makes for a fiddly experience in itself). A calibration weight is sometimes supplied with these gauges, which good for peace of mind.


I took a look at a number of ahem, Herb Scales online and found them at low as $6 postpaid (eBay).  Seems like something like this would be far easier to use.

Looks like the classic $20.00 Shure has been thoroughly obsolesced!

I'd say even a 0.1g accuracy would be okay for a cheap setup. You do have to take a look at the scale and make sure you can easily get the weighing platform under the stylus.

I have one of these - no manufacturer name and replacing the batteries is a little fiddlier than it needs to be (battery covers don't just unclip, hence the supplied screwdriver), but the weighing area is nice and low, with a centre spot. I forget exactly what I paid, but it was definitely quite cheap. It goes to three decimal points, which is more than you'd ever need.


Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #35
Note to self: if I want to go back to vinyl, then I need something else than my whisky-diluting dropcounter.
High Voltage socket-nose-avatar

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #36
Michael Fremer (and I know he's persona non grata here) mentioned getting an ultracheap USB microscope (with light) for checking stylus condition. I took a look online, and you can get one for about five quid!

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #37
Michael Fremer (and I know he's persona non grata here) mentioned getting an ultracheap USB microscope (with light) for checking stylus condition. I took a look online, and you can get one for about five quid!


There is the odd bit of wisdom buried in his audiophile rantings, and that's definitely one of them.

No one in the entire history of record playback has ever bothered to count the hours of usage on their pickups, making the commonly recommended 500-800 hour change interval slightly meaningless. Much better to actually check the stylus for wear, which also lets you see whether your antiskating etc. is set correctly.

Is there anything "bad" on having no automatic vinyl arm?

Reply #38
Michael Fremer (and I know he's persona non grata here) mentioned getting an ultracheap USB microscope (with light) for checking stylus condition. I took a look online, and you can get one for about five quid!


There is the odd bit of wisdom buried in his audiophile rantings, and that's definitely one of them.

No one in the entire history of record playback has ever bothered to count the hours of usage on their pickups, making the commonly recommended 500-800 hour change interval slightly meaningless. Much better to actually check the stylus for wear, which also lets you see whether your antiskating etc. is set correctly.

Maybe someone can make a turntable with a Foobar-style playing time counter. 

As for Michael Fremer, he gets many things right among the unscientific/emotive stuff, he has an enjoyable writing style and his genuine love of music has pointed me in the direction of some good albums.

Oh, and when I emailed him with a question, he got right back to me (allowing for transatlantic time difference) and followed up the correspondence when I had more questions. A gent.

I'm still looking for a copy of his stand-up comedy LP, though.

 
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