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Topic: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000 (Read 55830 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #76
Please update binary on official site, http://mathaudio.com/foo_room_eq.zip old ver 2.5.5. Where can I get ver, 2.5.7?
I've just checked the binary. Its version is correct (2.5.7). Simply remove v.2.5.5 in your Control Panel, then install v.2.5.7 in accordance with the instruction which can be found in the ZIP file.


Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #78
Very interesting software! I have just experimented with this in Foobar. It has certainly cleared up the low end in my room and brought the mids and highs into greater focus. I'm not sure if I "prefer" the sound yet, it will take a while to get used to. Is it possible to re-run the test with the corrections activated to see a new set of results with the MathAudio amendments in place?

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #79
Maybe someone can clarify this.

In the MathAudio guide for the Foobar room EQ plugin, it only mentions interfacing the speakers and microphone
via a computer soundcard. I haven't got one of them.

My system is: Computer - USB DAC/Preamplfier - Amplifier - Speakers. If I had one of the recomended USB microphones
is that enough for this to work or would I still need a soundcard to act as an interface for some reason?

If I am good to go with my present system does anyone else use a similar setup - got any advice/tips? 

Thanks

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #80
Very interesting software! I have just experimented with this in Foobar. It has certainly cleared up the low end in my room and brought the mids and highs into greater focus. I'm not sure if I "prefer" the sound yet, it will take a while to get used to. Is it possible to re-run the test with the corrections activated to see a new set of results with the MathAudio amendments in place?
The component doesn't include such a feature: the measurement subsystem is implemented as an independent block which doesn't include the correction algorithm. The component corrects the 'average' response of the room which is calculated as a result of the multipoint measurement.  You may safely trust the averaged response plots (taking into consideration that they are smoothed for better readability).

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #81
My system is: Computer - USB DAC/Preamplfier - Amplifier - Speakers. If I had one of the recomended USB microphones
is that enough for this to work or would I still need a soundcard to act as an interface for some reason?
You may connect your USB microphone directly to your PC. After that click the "In/Out" button in the Room EQ component window and select the USB input (this input will be visible after connecting the microphone to your PC).

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #82
Hey!

Really nice plug-in. I have a little experience in DRC programs and this seems like a very good and cheap(est) alternative to high cost analogues.

I have two questions:

- After applying correction, the overall volume level significantly dropped. Is there a way to add some gain lost due to correction? And foobar plugin you would recommend to compensate for the lost volume?

- Although, a very nice addition to a home-audio system, do you think this plug-in will work as nicely in the car environment? I am currently contemplating a CarPC install with PC being the central DSP and am choosing a DRC solution.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #83
Hey!

Really nice plug-in. I have a little experience in DRC programs and this seems like a very good and cheap(est) alternative to high cost analogues.

I have two questions:

- After applying correction, the overall volume level significantly dropped. Is there a way to add some gain lost due to correction? And foobar plugin you would recommend to compensate for the lost volume?

- Although, a very nice addition to a home-audio system, do you think this plug-in will work as nicely in the car environment? I am currently contemplating a CarPC install with PC being the central DSP and am choosing a DRC solution.
- This plug-in doesn't change the maximum amplitude of the audio signal. Adding some gain can cause clipping in your DAC. It is recommended to use the volume control of your audio amplifier to compensate for the lost average volume.
- Yes, this plug-in will work in the car environment. Use no less than 10 measurement points.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #84
Using this on my PC with Foobar2000 and a Dayton Audio UMM-6 calibrated mic did a very nice job of correcting the two channel system in room response at my listening position.

Thanks for the great capability!

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #85
News
New version released ( v2.5.8 ).
The new version supports microphone calibration files with the .txt file extension.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #86
This software needs the volume adjustment feature as the Math Audio processing results in digital clipping.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #87
News
New version released ( v2.5.9 ).
The new version includes an additional gain control slider.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #88
This software needs the volume adjustment feature as the Math Audio processing results in digital clipping.
Room EQ doesn't clip the sound, however, its output signal can exceed 0 dB. Old versions of Room EQ relied on the host's volume control to avoid clipping. The latest version includes an amplitude indicator which helps to set the "Room EQ gain" control to the position corresponding to 0 dB output (see Fig.8 at http://mathaudio.com/room-eq.htm ).

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #89
News
New version released ( v2.6.0 ).
The new version includes an additional amplitude indicator.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #90
The sound is absent because you didn't measure the frequency response of your room.
You need to measure the frequency response in accordance with the instruction: mathaudio.com/room-eq.htm
After that click the "Room EQ" radio button and move down the vertical slider to cut out the resonances of your room.

So I can't use this as a simple click-and-drag parametric equalizer?


Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #92
I'm requesting a button to simulate a perfectly flat frequency response white line so I can notch it as I see fit.  What say you?

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #93
Then I'd say what you're requesting is not a room correction filter, as room correction is not something you can do by merely tweaking parameters until it sounds good.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #94
This component already has the hard part down.  The only thing missing is to add a simple button that provides a perfect response to play with.

Here comes the semantics: "room correction" is arbitrary and ambiguous in the first place.  My hand-made correct curve is not objectively any worse than something spit out and adjusted from a "good" microphone at a "reasonable" listening position.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #95
foobar has a built-in equalizer if you want to do it yourself.


Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #97
The closest you'll get is foo_dsp_xgeq, which is already a better equalizer than the one that comes with the player, simply by virtue of the available open source solution, SuperEQ, being a piece of crap if you don't work around its shortcomings manually. I say manually, because for most/all frequency bands, it has a sheer dropoff on both sides, and the only way to have a smooth slope of frequency response between wide points is to manually configure SuperEQ with more ranges and interpolate the response levels.

xgeq is already capable of fine grained and also smooth response slopes, if that's what you're after. Maybe you can ask xnor to make a parametric equalizer that plots a logarithmic frequency line, and lets you redraw the line almost like a paint program. It won't be an automated room correction filter like this plug-in, but it will be what you want.

Basically, this plug-in is probably never going to be a parametric equalizer, because that's not what it was designed to be. It plays reference sounds, it collects the impulse response using a reference microphone, and it performs deconvolution to produce an impulse simulating the conditions of your room. Then it calculates an inverse to that impulse response, assuming that to compensate for relative frequency losses caused by your speakers or room, it needs to pump up the frequency ranges inverse to the effects of that filter.

Maybe it could be a parametric equalizer, but it doesn't even need to know the numeric frequencies that it's correcting. It merely needs to take a frequency domain plot of your room/speakers' impulse response, normalize it, then inverse the values of each band, so accentuated frequencies are attenuated, and attenuated frequencies are accentuated.

If I were feeling adventurous, I could try to make an overlapped FIR-based parametric equalizer, using the same FFT library as foobar's visualization system, KissFFT. But I have no idea how the different bands of a frequency domain conversion relate to the base or the nyquist frequencies, or what their relative frequency steps would be. I would have to play with it a bit and measure the results.

Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #98
I understand how this component is intended to be used.  The thing is, it already has clicky-draggy support, so it seems like it would be easy to make it generate a perfectly flat response for manual frequency twiddling because manual frequency twiddling is already supported.  I appreciate that only attenuation is allowed, because that protects the natural excursion of the audio components, as the author describes.

I hope my attached mockup makes what I want crystal clear.

I tried hacking foobar2000's "Core.cfg" to insert 0 values for each frequency band, but I don't know how to recalculate the file's checksum (assuming my hacking was correct), so no-go.


Re: MathAudio Room EQ for Foobar2000

Reply #99
I'd love playing with this. My current setup sounds fine to my ears, but I would like to see what this program thinks of it and if correction can even make things sound better.

I was always about playing absolutely bitperfect and without any EQ, but maybe this changes my mind...

I have a mic connector on my mainboard, play music via a USB connection and I have 2 denon calibration mics that came with my previous receiver.

Off course this is not a real calibrated measurement microphone, but could it be somewhat useful for this task?
I'd like to know if I can get this to work, before buying a dedicated calibrated microphone.

Are there any clues how "off" this method can be? Apart from the microphone I use the onboard soundcard's microphone input. Does that make a huge difference or is the mic by far the most determining factor?

Thanks in advance!

 
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