Skip to main content
Topic: MP3Gain For Other Codecs? (Read 2878 times) previous topic - next topic
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Having come to know MP3Gain over the last few months, I cannot stress enough how much this program rocks!!!!

Is there a similar utility to support, in order: AAC, WMA, MPC, and OGG?

Many players have similar utilities that level the 'playing' volume while on the PC. But that is not the same. What I love about MP3Gain is that it makes all my sent to portable files the same volume and my mixed CDs the same volume.

MMBJ and WMA claim they level the volume when burning a CD, but I think everyone in this forum knows that is a joke!

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #1
The only program I know that supports them all is Foobar2000 (with AAC and WMA plugins).
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you."

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #2
Quote
The only program I know that supports them all is Foobar2000 (with AAC and WMA plugins).


Unless I missed something, Foobar does not support portable players however. Am I wrong?

Further, Foobar does not chang ethe file like MP3Gain does (I think). does it not just use replaygain to volume level?

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #3
Quote
Quote
The only program I know that supports them all is Foobar2000 (with AAC and WMA plugins).


Unless I missed something, Foobar does not support portable players however. Am I wrong?

Further, Foobar does not chang ethe file like MP3Gain does (I think). does it not just use replaygain to volume level?

ohh... then the answer would be. no
your best bet is to do a Wavegain before encoding.
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you."

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #4
I second that...   

WaveGain would probably be the easiest solution, because you'd only have to do it once to permanently alter the gain of the WAV file from which all other encoded variations of the file will come.  The only downside (I can think of) is that WaveGain is lossy, in the sense that using it eliminates any bits in the WAV file representing sound pushed below the noise floor when a gain adjustment is applied.  But I've never heard of anyone being able to tell the difference in sound quality of a "reasonably" adjusted file (about 4dB to 7dB).  Exceptions would occur if the file is adjusted *way* too steeply, such as turning down a file down by 50dB, then back up...clearly anything except fairly loud passages would be gone.  If I regularly used formats other than MP3, then I'd use WaveGain myself.

Specifically for Ogg you can use VorbisGain, which you can find at the Rarewares - Ogg Vorbis Software section.  I don't know if it's gain adjustment is lossless or lossy, though.

As for MPC, AAC or WMA, I don't know.  A forum search (if you haven't already tried one) might turn up more info, as well.

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #5
Quote
Specifically for Ogg you can use VorbisGain, which you can find at the Rarewares - Ogg Vorbis Software section.  I don't know if it's gain adjustment is lossless or lossy, though.


Yes, it's lossless, vorbisgain adds replaygain info as vorbis comments to the file, and doesn't modify the original stream at all.

edit: lossy -> lossless. oops 

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #6
Quote
Quote
Specifically for Ogg you can use VorbisGain, which you can find at the Rarewares - Ogg Vorbis Software section.  I don't know if it's gain adjustment is lossless or lossy, though.


Yes, it's lossy, vorbisgain adds replaygain info as vorbis comments to the file, and doesn't modify the original stream at all.

Just curious...If it doesn't affect the original stream, then wouldn't it be considered a lossless adjustment?

(Forgive my naivety if I'm wrong...)

MP3Gain For Other Codecs?

Reply #7
Quote
Quote
Quote
Specifically for Ogg you can use VorbisGain, which you can find at the Rarewares - Ogg Vorbis Software section.  I don't know if it's gain adjustment is lossless or lossy, though.


Yes, it's lossy, vorbisgain adds replaygain info as vorbis comments to the file, and doesn't modify the original stream at all.

Just curious...If it doesn't affect the original stream, then wouldn't it be considered a lossless adjustment?

(Forgive my naivety if I'm wrong...)

it's lossless, must have been a typo
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you."

 
SimplePortal 1.0.0 RC1 © 2008-2019