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Topic: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio? (Read 1242 times) previous topic - next topic
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Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Haven't seen any original research on this topic.  What are the prevailing thoughts?

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #1
I remember people with good hearing and myself being younger looking for a lowpass to save bandwith with mp3.
Even when i heard a 20kHz sinuid back then a 18.5kHz lowpass with music was not detectable for me and others.
No one btw. raised his hand to complain about unpleasant ringing of such a lowpass.
Is troll-adiposity coming from feederism?
With 24bit music you can listen to silence much louder!

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #2
Quote
Haven't seen any original research on this topic.
I'm sure it exists...  And certainly, there have been studies related to lossy compression.  We know that the highest audible frequencies are masked in normal program material, so you can get-by without 20kHz even if you can hear to 20kHz in a controlled hearing test.   And, I'll betcha' there were studies back in the "analog days".

And, the lowest note on an standard bass guitar is about 40Hz (I'm not sure about a "typical" kick drum) and many pro subwoofers for live or club use are "tuned' for performance down to about 40Hz.    (A good studio-monitor sub or a good  home theater sub will go lower, typically with less overall efficiency and a lower maximum SPL.)

20-20kHz is the "traditional"/nominal human hearing range.  The theory is, if you can cover the range of human hearing, that's enough.  And, it's easy-enough to do unless you have some kind of "external" transmission/storage/format constraints, so why not cover the full range of human hearing???  (Although, flat  response over that range is NOT easy with transducers and strong-flat low frequencies from a woofer/subwoofer are not "easy".)

P.S.
I think the idea is that 20-20kHz is adequate.    That is, you don't gain anything by building an amplifier that goes from 0-100kHz (which is easy to do with solid state electronics) but you might loose something if your amplifier only goes from 50-15kHz.     (Although you might benefit from going lower with home theater effects that might be felt rather than heard as sound.)

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #3
I'm sure it exists...  And certainly, there have been studies related to lossy compression.

Where is JJ when you need him?

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #4
On the lowest bass guitar notes, aren't you mainly hearing the overtones?

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #5
High-fidelity in the “golden age”:

Nowadays, it seems that for all practical purposes, 20–20k can be referred to as not just high but full-fidelity.

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #6
High-fidelity in the “golden age”:

Nowadays, it seems that for all practical purposes, 20–20k can be referred to as not just high but full-fidelity.

It is still true that a frequency range without deviate tolerance doesn't mean a lot in the real world.

DIN standards were a little tighter for other devices:

From the same web site:

"
Frequency range at least 40Hz to 12,5kHz with permissible deviations (relative to 1kHz) of ±4,5dB from 40 to 50Hz,
±3dB from 50Hz to 6,3kHz and ±4,5dB from 6,3 to 12,5kHz.
"

The best answer I know is posted on this site:
https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php/topic,107570.msg894226.html#msg894226

 

Re: Do we "need" those 20Hz - 20kHz frequencies for high-fidelity audio?

Reply #7
My original post was meant in jest as we currently have threads asking the forum if we "need" frequencies <20Hz and >20kHz, but I appreciate the sincere responses that have been provided.  I learned something today.

Interesting that I recognize everyone who has replied as members who are typically a "voice of reason" on HA.  Thanks to each of you for all of your help over the years.

 
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