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Topic: Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine (Read 3920 times) previous topic - next topic
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Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine

Reply #25
I've searched in vain for third party measurements on its wow, flutter, and rumble, ideally weighted and unweighted, for many years. Might you happen to know of any?


Archimago did some tests of wow and flutter a little while back: http://archimago.blogspot.dk/2014/08/measu...00-m3d-wow.html

As for the original topic, I don't think the increased demand from mainstream companies is destroying the LP format as such, but it is likely that they can hog all of the pressing plants' production capacity, by virtue of their deeper pockets and larger production runs that are easier for the plants to handle, since they don't have to reconfigure as often. Of course, this is not good for the smaller players, the ones the kept the format alive for DJs etc., and they risk being financially outmaneuvered.

On the other hand, specialty small-production LP production is a fading market, as basically all DJs play digital files and use DJ controllers. I'd bet most of them have never touched and turntable, and probably have no desire to do so. And those that have use timecode records instead of playing 'live' records.

So whether or not all of the small players are forced out of the market depends on how long the current upswing in LP sales and interest lasts, or if it's here to stay around current levels. If it keeps going, the mainstream manufacturers are gonna keep the pressing plants even busier, and maybe even be forced to train new people how to do the master cuts and electroplating.

As a sidenote, I recently sold my old SL-1500 to a guy who wanted it for the direct drive motor, to use in record production. They've been running a specialty small-run pressing plant right here in Copenhagen for a couple of years now. I wonder how long they can keep it going.



Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine

Reply #28
Meh, it's just in keeping with what society(/marketers) have deemed today as being stylish.

Who the fuck is Jeff Rowland anyway, and why is is name attached to the 2D look of corrugated metal?  Puh-leeze!

Even more reason why I have to laugh at those who can't look outside their petri dish and point back to the original post.

Blimey, did you get out of bed the wrong side today?

I quite like the look of it, although I probably wouldn't buy one.

Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine

Reply #29
Nah, but I can see why you'd say that.
Is 24-bit/192kHz good enough for your lo-fi vinyl, or do you need 32/384?

Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine

Reply #30
It's hard for me to accept the premise that increased demand is bad for the business/industry.    And if there is demand for quality pressings, quality pressings be made.  I wonder how many of these records are "collected" and never played?

If the manufactures were projecting lasting increased demand, they'd be investing in plant & equipment.  Apparently there is not enough demand to justify new machines.

Quote
I've searched in vain for third party measurements on its wow, flutter, and rumble, ideally weighted and unweighted, for many years.
I've NEVER heard any wow or flutter from ANY non-defective turntable.      I don't remember if I've ever heard rumble...  maybe, but it was never a concern to me.    The surface noise on the record and preamp hum & hiss were all bigger concerns.    ...And, frequency response issues and occasional distortion issues.

Of course nowadays I don't worry about any of this.  I only use a turntable once in awhile to digitize an LP (when it's not available digitally) and I'm no longer looking for "the best analog sound".    (I have a less-expensive, less-'torquey' Technics direct-drive turntable and a Shure cartridge...  Good enough for digitizing 30 or 40 year old records.)

Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine

Reply #31
It's hard for me to accept the premise that increased demand is bad for the business/industry.    And if there is demand for quality pressings, quality pressings be made.  I wonder how many of these records are "collected" and never played?

If the manufactures were projecting lasting increased demand, they'd be investing in plant & equipment.  Apparently there is not enough demand to justify new machines.


I believe the core issue is that the mainstream labels are sweeping in and locking up all the production capacity. The small labels that kept releasing LPs for the period where no one else bothered do not like this situation, since now there are waiting periods of several months to get their records produced.

In addition to this they see the current LP revival as a fad, so when it dies out again, the mainstream labels will go back to digital media again. They will leave behind even further worn-down LP production equipment, with no money or effort spent to improve the production situation to keep up with the demand. The niche labels simply do not have this kind of money, they have been producing on the remains of mainstream LP production, which had been abandoned by the big labels.

It would behoove the mainstream labels to actually spend some money on improving LP production, if they want to continue releasing on vinyl. Unfortunately they obviously don't want to spend any money if they can just ride out this LP revival on current production capacity, and leave behind a burning wreck, as well as running a lot of niche labels out of business.

Why vinyl hype is destroying the record ~ Fact Magazine

Reply #32
"There are only two companies worldwide that produce lacquers. One of these companies is a one-man operation in Japan run by an old man who produces the lacquers in his garage."
Pressed To The Edge ~ Fact Magazine


I thought that had to be a mistake, because many services offer lacquer cutting, and their websites say they do it themselves. They describe their lathes and everything. But I see now...the cutters all get their blank discs from the same two sources. You'd think this wouldn't be an insurmountable problem. If there's a market, people will figure out how to make them again.

 
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