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Jack White's new vinyl LP - lots of tricks

Jack White (of White Stripes) is releasing a new vinyl LP today. The vinyl features several unusual features:

1) one side plays center-out, like the early Pathé discs
2) one track has multiple entries that merge to a common conclusion. I emphasize track, because it's only the one track that has this feature, unlike the old puzzle records which did this on entire sides
3) there are "hidden" tracks under the labels(!) - one plays at 45, the other at 78

There's more. See this page...
http://thirdmanstore.com/jack-white-lazaretto-12-vinyl
...which includes a ten minute video of all the extra features.

(post mostly copied from http://forum.talkingmachine.info/viewtopic...f=3&t=17311 )


Also "Absolutely zero compression used during recording, mixing and mastering" (sounds kind of unlikely - I think just during mastering, as described in the video, sounds more plausible).

I don't know if this is engineering or art, but the resulting object is pretty cool. I hope the music is worth all the effort, but I'd be tempted to buy it even if it isn't!

Cheers,
David.

Jack White's new vinyl LP - lots of tricks

Reply #1
Hidden tracks under the labels?? WTF...  My TT doesn't even have a 78 rpm setting.

I think Jack White is known for releasing more dynamic (than currently average) albums on both vinyl and CD.
The Loudness War is over. Now it's a hopeless occupation.


Jack White's new vinyl LP - lots of tricks

Reply #3
There have been a few Lp's that play 'inside out' I have two from German Classical Label Tacet. The idea is with classical music the crescendo will be at the outside of the disc where the distortion is minimal rather than the inner groove where it is greatest this allows the album to be cut with higher dynamics.
Tacet also use only valves at every stage of their 'AAA' recordings even the lathe is valve/tube and the pressings are some of the quietest I've heard with almost CD like silent background-amazing!
Here's a link:
http://www.tacet.de/main/seite1.php?langua...;layout=katalog

Jack White's new vinyl LP - lots of tricks

Reply #4
Quote
Hidden tracks under the labels?? WTF... My TT doesn't even have a 78 rpm setting.
Most modern turntables don't play 78 RPM.  That just makes it more interesting! 

The last time I had a turntable that could play 78's was probably around 1972.  At that time, 78 was common on cheap-average turntables, but not as common on "hi-fi" models.  Cheap ceramic/crystal cartridges had a flip-over stylus to switch between 78 and 33/45, but with a magnetic cartridge you had to switch styli or switch cartidges.  (I'm sure the 78 groove on the Jack White album doesn't require a special stylus.)

Quote
You obviously have to place the needle on the paper in order to play those hidden tracks...
  HA! HA!  ...I was thinking you had to peel-off the label!      ...Obviously, I didn't bother reading/watching the links.

Quote
The idea is with classical music the crescendo will be at the outside of the disc where the distortion is minimal rather than the inner groove where it is greatest this allows the album to be cutwith higher dynamics.
That 's like a great idea...  If we didn't have CDs which don't have these dynamic range problems...    On regular popular/rock records, the "hit single" was usually first in the outside groove which makes sense for that kind of music.

Jack White's new vinyl LP - lots of tricks

Reply #5
Speaking of vinyl tricks.

I saw Claude Young from Detroit play a record upside down and from the outside in without missing a beat.

He put a kind of cotton bobbin on top of the spindle, jammed the record down with a pen or something. Turned the cartridge upside down and adjusted the balance. Then mixed it in. Neat party trick. 


 
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