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Topic: Uneven speakers tone on stereo A/V receiver (Read 453 times) previous topic - next topic
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Uneven speakers tone on stereo A/V receiver

Hello everyone,

I'm using a Technics SA AX-530 and I have noticed that the left channel has more bass and treble than the right.
I have checked the wiring and tested with different inputs but the results were the same.

Can anyone help me? Thanks.

Re: Uneven speakers tone on stereo A/V receiver

Reply #1
Maybe speaker relays going bad?
Who are you and how did you get in here ?
I'm a locksmith, I'm a locksmith.

Re: Uneven speakers tone on stereo A/V receiver

Reply #2
Hello, more bass can happen if the speaker is placed in the corner of a room.
To be sure you can first switch the cabling from left to right and in a second step switch the speakers themselves from left to right and vice versa.

Supplement: If they are multi-way speakers, you can check the woofer, midrange and tweeter with your ear

Re: Uneven speakers tone on stereo A/V receiver

Reply #3
Did you try contact cleaner on the knobs for this unit?  After Googling what this unit looks like, this is the most I can think of trying for something like that.  I don't think I've seen the back of a receiver with only composite video in a very long time.  I can imagine this thing is quite old.

 

Re: Uneven speakers tone on stereo A/V receiver

Reply #4
Quote
I have checked the wiring and tested with different inputs but the results were the same.
Different sources too, or just different inputs?

And/or, if they are analog inputs swap the left & right inputs.   If the problem switches to the other channel the problem is the source.

Besides swapping the speaker connections, if there's a chance that it's the room acoustics (like one speaker in a corner) you can swap the speaker position and connections.

If it turns-out to be a speaker can you remove the grill to inspect them visually?     If the woofers have foam surround it's not unusual for the foam to "rot".   Or, you should also see the woofer move with loud bass (and you can compare to the good speaker) and if it's working you can feel it vibrating if you touch it.      A blown tweeter may have any visual signs of damage.