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Topic: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article) (Read 1486 times) previous topic - next topic
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How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Quote
The Compact Disc turns 40 this year, and there are already signals the format is primed for a mini revival. For the first time in 17 years, CD sales actually went up - and by almost 50 percent, according to the RIAA’s sales database.
~ https://www.engadget.com/how-to-survive-the-inevitable-cd-revival-130013506.html
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?  ;~)

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #1
Yahoo!!!

These really are good news for CD lovers!

If all disc manufactures take enough care to coats and keep it in complete closed box, It will be the perfect format for music because someone can reads it infinity.

I inherited some CD from middle 80s and these play fine and pass PureRead 4+.

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #2
Thank you Adele and BTS
🤮

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #3
A strange game. The only winning move is not to play the loudness war.

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #4
However I would like this to be true, it seems unlikely this will last.

10 years ago, there were 5 shops selling CDs within 15 kilometers of where I live. 1 was a dedicated shop, 1 sold CDs next to DVDs and Blu-rays and 3 were shops having it as a small part of their offering (a book shop selling CDs for example) The dedicated shop sold 80% CDs and 20% vinyl.

Now, one one of those 5 remains: the dedicated shop however now offers 70% vinyl and 30% CDs. The CD/DVD/Blu-ray shop has gone out of business, the 3 other shops no longer offer any CDs. There is now one new shop selling records, but that is strictly vinyl only.

It seems unlikely to me these odds will swap again, at least in my neighborhood.
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #5
streaming services would need to continue to increase subscription prices, and CD manufactures and retailers would need to decrease prices

hard to see any physical media ever used as a primary distribution system ever again
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?  ;~)

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #6
I'm not sure it is about pricing really. Some people simply like the 'all you can eat' model with optionally having the selection delegated to an algorithm. Some of those people won't give up the ease of having an algorithm decide even when getting records for free (i.e. piracy).

Some people (like me) prefer 'owning' a library. I know of each library item what I can expect and which one to select for a certain mood. I could switch to streaming, but I probably won't like the selection algorithm (I suspect this because I don't like YouTube's). If I were to for some reason lose access to my library (for example my CDs go up in flames, primary storage device and backups fail simultaneously) I would switch to streaming because of the expense of rebuilding my library, but for now buying a CD every few months is cheaper than streaming. If for some reason my library ceases to fit my (shifted) musical taste, using a streaming service would also be appropriate. It really depends on the 'rate' I buy records.

So I guess it boils down to personal listening preference and 'momentum' more than price. At least, I feel that way.
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #7
Streaming, whether it's music or movies, appeals to people who like briefly trying different things. Buying CDs to listen to them once is prohibitively expensive. Physical media appeals to people who know their tastes and only want to listen to their favourites over and over. Paying monthly to stream the same album repeatedly is more expensive than just buying it once and being able to listen to it as many times as you want.

Re: How to survive the inevitable CD revival (Article)

Reply #8
I don't care about physical media. Download veteran... CDs don't matter because for me they are unnecessary. Vinyl/Tape: I was happy flawed technology died. Dreams came true.
Died...well, except in hipster land.