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Topic: Weird things with WavPack lossy standard.  (Read 8788 times) previous topic - next topic
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Weird things with WavPack lossy standard.

I was downloading the AC/DC album, Black Ice. It finished normally and I started to find my favorite songs, I found three, next I resolved to encode them, the output was normal and nothing weird, I send the songs to my phone and when I went to play them, my lossy WavPack files had exactly the bitrate that the lossless source 192kHz 24 bit and the files occupied a weird space: 28 MB; for that frequency and the bit depth.

1) Is that normal on WavPack lossy?
2) Can it be a tag reading error? (I think it can't be because dBpoweramp read the same)

Re: Weird things with WavPack lossy standard.

Reply #1
Well, 870 kbps for 192 kHz sampling rate means about 4.5 bits per stereo sample, which is right around the minimum that WavPack lossy can do, so that makes sense. And 28 MB would be for a 4:30 song, so that makes sense too.

What does not make sense is that your original lossless download would also be 870 kbps...it should be much higher unless it's something else. It does make sense that the 192 kHz and 24 bit stays the same, because that is referring to the source of the lossy WavPack (and what you get when you decode).

Unless you know that your phone's codec runs at 192 kHz, you could downsample the tracks before encoding them with WavPack lossy (say to 96 kHz). Then they would report a lower sampling rate, but WavPack lossy can not change the sampling rate by itself (it only changes the bitrate).

Re: Weird things with WavPack lossy standard.

Reply #2
Well, 870 kbps for 192 kHz sampling rate means about 4.5 bits per stereo sample, which is right around the minimum that WavPack lossy can do, so that makes sense. And 28 MB would be for a 4:30 song, so that makes sense too.

What does not make sense is that your original lossless download would also be 870 kbps...it should be much higher unless it's something else. It does make sense that the 192 kHz and 24 bit stays the same, because that is referring to the source of the lossy WavPack (and what you get when you decode).

Unless you know that your phone's codec runs at 192 kHz, you could downsample the tracks before encoding them with WavPack lossy (say to 96 kHz). Then they would report a lower sampling rate, but WavPack lossy can not change the sampling rate by itself (it only changes the bitrate).
The Lossless FLAC was around 5000 kbps, I know the fact, but thanks.

 
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