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1
DCC implemented an early kind of lossy or perceptually-based encoding.  As computational power per dollar increased, and more was discovered about the natural insensitivity of the human ear to certain sounds in certain circumstances, it was possible to have better sound quality using less space on the media. Of course, media density and flexibility also improved vastly.

If you haven't noticed, flash memory is eating optical media's lunch and doubling its already good price/performance every few years.

If you can't find what you need along these lines of data compression and media data density in current technology, maybe its time to revisit your requirements.  It is highly unlikely that a student is going to meaningfully improve these areas

This does not answer my question. My question was mostly asking how was the data modulated on the actual tape since technically a DCC tape does not differ to a Cassette tape as much as they differ to DAT and VHS tapes. The whole key was the modulation/demodulation process which I can't seem to be able to replicate. I doubt that a DCC tape as a media allowed for higher bandwith storage, it should be ideantical to a cassette tape.

Irrelevant. If you look at where the market is going, namely downloads and streaming, there is no bankable demand for media with longer play times.  Downloads and streaming are selling partially based on the fact that they distribute music in other ways than long playing prepackaged media. I don't see any market for longer playtimes at all.
You are talking about today standars when I am talking about standars of over a decade ago where record labels would go as far as cutting parts of a track or a remix shorter to fit the maximum length of a Redbook disc. I have Remix compilations that go even a step further and use overburning with longer than allowed playtimes which the playback cuts on the last track mostly on older equipment that don't seem to cope well with such thing. One of the discs funilly enough is a Sterlingsound reference disc that was sent to radio stations containing the instrumentals of an Album track containing the B-Sides too.
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 hi, halb27
Well, I have tested my set of samples. It makes sense to test more critical samples at 128 kbps and higher.
If You just would try yours  that would be great :)
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3rd Party Plugins - (fb2k) / Re: foo_dsp_effect
Last post by El Bastardo -
Willing to try 90%?

I guess. Better than 75% ^_-

But jokes aside now I know that it is a technical limitation and not just an internal change in settings/variables.


I guess offering the old algorithm next to the two new ones as a third option isn't possible anymore?

If so I don't see a reason not to offer the maximum possible in your next update, so 90%.


If the library you are using gets updated in the future you can keep that in mind, maybe we can even go to 200% then... not that I would use that but could be funny :p
4
24bit transmission doesn't work on current version 1.0 beta 15, released on 2016-03-24.
White noise comes from speakers. This is reported several times by different users in this thread.

When will it be resolved?
5
Thank you for your tests, IgorC. They show that Opus is great at 128 kbps and very good at 96 kbps.
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Hi there.

I'm using foo_upnp on Windows 10 and it's working fine for me, despite the fact it was discontinued (or so I read in its main thread).
I got one weird issue though and that's about the server function and its Multimedia Device Icon not showing up in Windows Explorer - This PC.
I had this issue since the first time I installed the plugin but it was only today I realized a weird fact: my DSL line went down for a couple of hours, so I had no connection to the internet and as long as my PC was basically offline, I could see foobar's icon in Explorer, with the the correct name (like "Music [MyPC]".
As soon as my router got the Internet back, foobar icon disappeared again from Explorer.

A couple of things to note:
1) I got a DLNA Server running on my home network (not the same PC I was talking about earlier) and its Icon always shows up in Explorer just fine.
2) I can browse and use foobar upnp just fine from Android, so the server gets discovered without issues on LAN devices.

Is there something I can do to fix this?
Thanks
7
Quote
Wikipedia says 17 KB/s for modern software, although I bet a good head is required to do that.
In the late '80s one could record digital CD quality on VCR tape.

http://audiophilereview.com/cd-dac-digital/in-praise-of-the-sony-pcm-f1.html

You're about 10 years late. The PCM-F1 was introduced in 1977 according to this source. PCM_adaptor Wikipedia article

I recall being blown away by bootleg PCM adapter - VCR digital tapes in the late 1970s.  I think it was a PCM-F1/Betamax combo. Both were relatively rare and pricey in those days, but some of the right people had them. I had never been so impressed since the first time I heard 1/2 track 15 ips studio masters, only more so.

Of course this gives the lie to claims that early digital converters were bad sounding. Their actual most serious problem was that they represented a highly  disruptive technology. I can't believe how long newbies have been continuing to swallow the same old lies about analog being audibly superior.
8
I'm sorry that I'm making a topic about 3 separate questions but I don't think they deserve separate topics for each.
So I've been having some ideas that come together with some questions.

1. What kind of technical advantages did they apply to DCC format (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Compact_Cassette) that made it possible to carry digital audio into a tape that a regular tape as a physical format (TYPE II or III let's say) can't do? I mean if you would use the same type of modulation and recording speed wouldn't you be able to store digital audio on a regular tape? I'm really trying to find a way to store digital audio on a tape as a project but the modulation methods available and the software available for storing digital data on tapes is not enough to achieve the robustness and the bitrate required for such project. Also I wasn't able to find enough documentation on the format which makes such project even harder)

DCC implemented an early kind of lossy or perceptually-based encoding.  As computational power per dollar increased, and more was discovered about the natural insensitivity of the human ear to certain sounds in certain circumstances, it was possible to have better sound quality using less space on the media. Of course, media density and flexibility also improved vastly.

If you haven't noticed, flash memory is eating optical media's lunch and doubling its already good price/performance every few years.

If you can't find what you need along these lines of data compression and media data density in current technology, maybe its time to revisit your requirements.   It is highly unlikely that a student is going to meaningfully improve these areas.

Quote
2. How come there was never a competitor to redbook CDs that actually uses somekind of lossless compression (let's say like DVD-A can use Meridian Lossless). I do get that it would mean that they wouldn't be backwards/redbook compatible but it's not like other competing formats were. There would be so many advantages, especially compared to rival formats, like:
*The actual hardware part of the reader is the cheapest one out of all the competitors and it's going to be present either way on the device that reads the actual disc.

There are all kinds of competing technologies in this area, and many of them are very good. A lot of them are about as free as free can be.  However, this market naturally became very fragmented. The number of potential competitors is vast and the market has not decided on just one or even just a few.

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*The medium is also the cheapest one compared to SACD discs and DVDs

I don't see any evidence that it costs appreciably more to make DVDs than CDs. The economies of scale favor whatever sells the fastest. It appears that all optical media, pressed or recordable is a declining market. Real-time downloads and flash memory are ascending or at least holding their own. It is a buyer's market.

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*Compressing the audio data would open the gate to compete directly with SACDs by offering higher sampling rates, higher bit depths or even longer playtimes.

SACD and DVD-A were solutions looking for a problem. There is no known audio sound quality problem with the Redbook CD other than perhaps lack of discrete channels. OTOH stereo seems to have a heck of a lot of life in it, still.  Proving that a sound quality problem exists should be very easy as the tools for doing so are readily available and again about as free as free gets, but nobody seems to be able to do it. Of course there is tons of anecdotal opinion otherwise, but can we all say "Placebo"? ;-)

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*Longer playtimes would eliminate the extra costs for more pressings with multiple discs that might not be needed.

Irrelevant. If you look at where the market is going, namely downloads and streaming, there is no bankable demand for media with longer play times.  Downloads and streaming are selling partially based on the fact that they distribute music in other ways than long playing prepackaged media. I don't see any market for longer playtimes at all.

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*Ability to include more metadata.

Ditto.

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*Ability to introduce some kind of strong(er than redbook technology) copy protection on the disc.

Ditto. Copy protection has always been a red herring because all known forms of copy protection are fairly trivial to  circumvent.

Forcing the digital music back into the analog domain is about as far as one can practically go with copy protection, and hardware and software that effectively circumvents that issue is readily available, has lots of trained users, and is highly effective.

9
About the capacity of the old tape there where datalogers in the late 80s that where capable of storing about 60MB in a standard 90' tape, or around 90Kbps, today using more advanced modulation techniques in a stereo tape is possible to double this to near 120MB 90' tape (190Kbps) using a quality deck, but going fancy building a deck where the head and is drivers are special designed to be connected to the DACs/ADCs and some precision control motors this can be pushed to 160MB 90' tape (248Kbps). This last option is similar to the approach of the DCC, after all more than magic the secret was math and enginering.
Any link to any tools and documentation for such thing? In theory alot can be possible but I haven't been able to find solid proof for such thing, like some kind of command line app that modulates the audio.
10
Opus / Re: OpusCut
Last post by VEG -
Oh, it seems that there is a topic with the same subject: https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php/topic,113498.0.html. Maybe it is better to join these topics.

I see that there is a solution, but I think that it will be much better to include such tool into the Opus Tools bundle. But there is no such plans for the future :( https://wiki.xiph.org/OpusTodo