Skip to main content

Recent Posts

1
In my EAC folder I have lame.exe and lame_enc.dll.    It appears to be using the exe file, although EAC is very configurable and there may be a way to make it use the dll. 

Quote
2) can i burn with eac  High-Res audio ? or do i need a specific program?
I've never burned with EAC, I only use it for ripping.   Audio CDs are 16-bit, 44.1kHz, stereo, uncompressed PCM.   Of course, you can burn a 24/96 FLAC or other "computer file" onto a CD as "data", and you can play it in your computer, but it's no longer an audio CD and most CD players won't play it.

Quote
just because i bought the last radiohead's album and it sounds clipped , i bought the vinyl and sound great , i use always headphone
Of course a vinyl record is going to sound "different" and some people may prefer the vinyl version,   It's also possible that it's mastered differently.  But technically  analog vinyl is inferior, and I'm sure you're hearing some surface noise that you don't hear with the digital version.   (Vinyl resolution is limited but the noise floor and is much worse than CD.)

Quote
now i'm thinking to buy again online and i found 24-bit WAV
Again, it may be mastered differently, so it may sound better or worse.  But, regular 16/44.1 CD audio is already better than human hearing (and far-far better than vinyl) so the high resolution format itself doesn't improve the sound.

If the high-resolution version is a different mix/master, you could copy the high-resolution version to CD (downsampling to 16/44.1, of course) and it will sound identical to the original high-resolution version.  Same with the vinyl...  You can digitize it and make a CD, and it will sound identical to the vinyl.

And of course, LAME is making an MP3 which is lossy.   A good (high bitrate) MP3 can often sound  identical to the high-resolution original, but MP3 would never be considered "high resolution".

2
hi
i have 2 question about Eac

1)
can Eac 1.3 use lame_enc.dll  ?
just because i have installed eac on a friend friend and copy lame_enc.dll  32Bit (LAME 3.99.5 Bundle compiled with Intel Compiler 14.0.3. ) , when i start eac , i can select in the compressio option lame encoer and in the drop menu there are several presets

when i restart eac 1.3 , there is no way to use  lame_enc.dll 


2) can i burn with eac  High-Res audio ? or do i need a specific program?

just because i bought the last radiohead's album and it sounds clipped , i bought the vinyl and sound great , i use always headphone
now i'm thinking to buy again online and i found 24-bit WAV

ps is there a topic about High-Res audio and if they are worth ?
sorry for my poor english
thanks

3
Validated News / Re: Opus 1.2 is out!
Last post by IgorC -
Congratulations on a new 1.2 release   ;D

Quote
  • Music quality improvements in the 32-48 kb/s range
It's worth to mention that there were quality improvements at 64 kbps and somewhat higher too.


4
I used to use a trick to get a similar result. I would not save it at all, work on it and  if I wanted to revert to last saved (which would be the version when foobar started) and then intentionally crash it it close it off without save (via task manager shut down the process). When it would restart normally all the changes I made weren't there anymore.
On later foobar releases this doesn't seem to work anymore so I stopped doing that.
5
General Audio / Re: Vynil or digital?
Last post by Arnold B. Krueger -


As well, I've heard some amazingly realistic recordings from vinyl
Based on what objective metric?  Did you have access to the master used to make the vinyl and failed to hear a difference?

I'm just wondering if these sweeping types of statements meet the normal requirements for making claims about audio quality here?
When free from controversy among those knowledgeable, yes, they are.

Interesting pair of comments. The first exceptional claim about perceived realism  by 2tec was no doubt based on a sighted evaluation, and then he turns and demands DBT confirmation for a number of well known inherent audible artifacts related to vinyl.

Moving goalposts, indeed!
6
Listening Tests / Re: 192kHz Samples -- But Not Really?
Last post by bennetng -
The MIDI plug in does seem to do 32-bit floating point internally.  I doubt you'll find a soundfont that actually has samples sampled at 192 KHz.  Not sure about VSTs as much but they're probably similar with their own samples.

Emu de MIDI.  This is probably something emulated at one sample rate natively then resampled to whatever the user wants.
That's unimportant as sf2 are often not chromatically sampled, and it allows up to 2 octaves pitch shift. But I was not talking about SoundFont synth in my previous post as the plugin is quite aliased.

https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php/topic,87639.msg803861.html#msg803861

Would like to see how kode54 thinks about Emu de MIDI. I'd consider aliasing in non sample-based synths as their character instead of distortion.
7
Listening Tests / Re: 192kHz Samples -- But Not Really?
Last post by Chibisteven -
Not only that, but it renders at 16 bit precision, always, so it's not really hi-res, either.
How about Emu de MIDI?

The MIDI plug in does seem to do 32-bit floating point internally.  I doubt you'll find a soundfont that actually has samples sampled at 192 KHz.  Not sure about VSTs as much but they're probably similar with their own samples.

Emu de MIDI.  This is probably something emulated at one sample rate natively then resampled to whatever the user wants.
8
Listening Tests / Re: 192kHz Samples -- But Not Really?
Last post by bennetng -
Not only that, but it renders at 16 bit precision, always, so it's not really hi-res, either.
How about Emu de MIDI?
9
Listening Tests / Re: 192kHz Samples -- But Not Really?
Last post by kode54 -
But your plugin only allows up to 96k sample rate, so disqualified.
Not only that, but it renders at 16 bit precision, always, so it's not really hi-res, either.
10
Once upon a time, it was possible to peek at the service which picks which tracks play next. At the same time, there was no shuffle functionality, so I had to implement it as a third party component. That changed with the 0.9 release, which closed the service loophole, and bundled a different but still functional shuffle functionality.

It sounds like it could still be valuable to predict tracks that will play next, to a limit, since these services are really only designed to pick out the exact next track that will play, and there's no telling how much work one of them would have to process to calculate multiple tracks ahead.

(Technically, the stock shuffler does predict the entire playlist ahead of time, but this is not guaranteed to be the case, what with a private service and all.)