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1
Thank you for all these replies. I will go over and answer these soon enough. To quickly answer one question: In order to upload to Bandcamp you must use FLAC, WAV, or AIFF and it must be under 291MB. For my math calculation, this is the formula: Length of time in seconds(x) = 291. For example, 3600x = 291. I would divide the left side by 3600 and the right side by the same. This would result in X = 0.08083. I then take this number and convert it to kiloBytes, not bits. The results is 80.83, but I just round down to 80 and boom! I could convert this file at a bitrate of 80 KB/s. This works really accurately with fre:ac but Format Factory is meh. I'm trying to figure out a way to result in more listen-able file concerning volume at the source recording level.
2
Some security software is preventing the C# compiler to generate the XML serialisation assembly for CTDB.
Apparently the serialization assembly can be pre-compiled and distributed with the application, but the process is a bit complicated.
I've tried to do it, but i'm not entirely sure if it's going to work. Can you try this for me? Just unpack the archive into EAC folder.
3
Hi. Sorry if this is addressed elsewhere, but I've looked and can't find the answer.

I have a directory that reads as follows:

c:/Input
Input/subdir-1/files*.*
Input/subdir-2/files*.*
Input/subdir-3/files*.*
etc.

I am converting, and I have an /Output folder, and the default is taking all of the files in the subdirectories and putting them all into the /Output folder, all of them. This is not what I want.

What I want is the converted files to go into a directory structure just like existed before. So that I have:

c:/Output
c:/Output/subdir-1/converted-files*.*
c:/Output/subdir-2/converted-files*.*

and so on.

What settings do I do for that?

Thanks.
4
Hello.

I recently got a new pair of active speakers (S1000DB), and I'm using both analog (PC) as well as optical (TV). The speakers have two analog inputs, however. One RCA pair is "700mv" and is labeled "AUX", the other is "900mv" and is labeled "PC." My analog source is a PC with a Xonar D1 sound card. I'm not sure which RCA pair to use to connect the 3.5mm line out from the Xonar to the speakers. I would assume I should connect it to the "PC" RCA pair, since the source is a PC, but this produces a quieter signal than the "AUX" and optical inputs.

The specs of the Xonar say:

Output/Input Full-Scale Voltage, 2 Vrms (5.65 Vp-p)

But I don't know what that means...  :-\

What I can say for sure, however, is that when I connect the optical out of the Xonar to the speakers at the same time as the analog out and switch between the sources, the 900mv PC connector is much quieter compared to the 700mv AUX connector. The 700mv AUX connector is in fact exactly as loud as the optical connector, which (perhaps naively?) makes me believe that's what should be used here, even though the source is a PC sound card.

Does someone know which is the correct RCA pair to use here?


Edit:
The full specs of the sound card are listed here: https://www.asus.com/us/Sound-Cards/Xonar_D1/specifications


The difference between 700 mv sensitivity and 900 mv sensitivity is about 2 dB which is rarely enough to make a significant difference. The one with the higher voltage is going to be little louder all things considered, but you may not be able to reliably hear the difference with rapidly varying audio signals like music. You should be able to use them interchangeably
.
5
The Zoom recorder has a 1/8" input for line signals. Although the preamp has RCA output jacks, they are obviously taking the signal outside of the differential domain. One of the advantages of running differential circuits is lower noise. My concern was thus increased noise in doing a direct connection since I would be loosing the differential operation, plus it was a hassle to pull the FocusRite from the studio. So I set up the Zoom. This particular preamp is about 25 years old, being one of the first MP-1s built and so is a little nosier than later units. The Zoom was simply placed on a table, but what I didn't think about is that there is an arch between the living room where the speakers reside and the table. Imaging detail is diffused by both the arch and the flat plane of the table forward of the microphones in the Zoom.

There is a hum in the recording- the hum comes from the furnace fan. Having lived in Minnesota (which gets cold) and the same house since 1971 I no longer think about it.

I was asked to record a quieter portion of the LP. The first cut is a good 6 db louder through most of the track. I did prove my point despite the usual remonstrations.

Any possible losses due to taking the signal outside of the differential domain vanish in comparison to losses inherent in taking it outside of the electrical domain and into the acoustic domain.

Look at it this way - the designer of your preamp obviously designed the recording output jacks for the purpose of driving a recorder, which is the task at hand.

If you have so little respect for the preamp's designer's implementation of recording outputs, what are you doing with the rest of such a piece of junk in your system?
6
How do I make the BPM (Beats Per Minutes) plug-in always show/appear within FooBar2000 main dashboard; is that possible?  Please provide easy step-by-step directions.  Thanks A Million.

I did a search here at this forum ……and after reading I am not sure this possible.  Is it possible?

Is there such software available? (Yes I am aware of Serato Software).

If not; Foobar2000 coders (or coders) please get to work for us DJ's or otherwise. ;)   Thanks.
7
The Zoom recorder has a 1/8" input for line signals. Although the preamp has RCA output jacks, they are obviously taking the signal outside of the differential domain. One of the advantages of running differential circuits is lower noise. My concern was thus increased noise in doing a direct connection since I would be loosing the differential operation, plus it was a hassle to pull the FocusRite from the studio. So I set up the Zoom. This particular preamp is about 25 years old, being one of the first MP-1s built and so is a little nosier than later units. The Zoom was simply placed on a table, but what I didn't think about is that there is an arch between the living room where the speakers reside and the table. Imaging detail is diffused by both the arch and the flat plane of the table forward of the microphones in the Zoom.

There is a hum in the recording- the hum comes from the furnace fan. Having lived in Minnesota (which gets cold) and the same house since 1971 I no longer think about it.

I was asked to record a quieter portion of the LP. The first cut is a good 6 db louder through most of the track. I did prove my point despite the usual remonstrations.




And you couldn't just hooked it up to a computer?  You're full of shit.

I live in a cold climate and since you said your home was built in 1971 I can imagine what that looks like and how loud the HVAC system is.  You aren't fooling me.  That type of hum (especially that of AC coil whining through the vents in a small home) is quite different.  A furnace is distinctive in its cycles and operations and most will just make a sound similar to large fan blowing air through the vents.  You just hear the air moving through, although you may hear the flames fire up before the blower turns on during a cycle.  Terms such as 2 ton blower going through vent systems that has a capacity of 2 tons has been brought up by AC & Furnace repairmen alike.  Did you purposely stay up until 3 am to record this as those usually when you get the most furnace cycles?

All the more reason that you're so full of shit for not using line in on a recording device, dude.

Which hospital dude?  Regions, United, Fairview, Abbott Northwestern?  Those all got psycho wards for you to visit and stay a while.
8
1) Better compression, not better quality. In reality both are very similar.

2) 128k-192k.

3) If you are using mp3 or AAC, very unlikely.
9
FLAC / CUETools DB Plugin Error: Ripping with Eac - HELP!
Last post by Encore_ -
Hello!
So first of all, I'm pretty much a newbie on the whole lossless audio ripping stuff. I installed EAC to rip my cd collection and believe I mostly understand it now. However, everytime I rip a CD, at the beginning of the Status Report (after ripping the CD) the following texts occurs:

---- CUETools DB Plugin V2.1.6

[CTDB TOCID: wuEITxTNYU8OaNhd0kGMrkcaNyo-] database access error: A program could not be executed. Executed command: "C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\csc.exe" /noconfig /fullpaths @"C:\Users\(Username)\AppData\Local\Temp\u-on1zij.cmdline".

==== Log checksum C2954F2860FE5CE77BD903C7745F01981E498A6816FEA4861F6621E50A76A60D ====

I translated the full sentences and omitted my name, but that's basically what it says.
CUETools would come in really handy for me, so can anyone please help me out? :)

And sorry if this is the wrong forum, wasn't sure where to post it!

10
Somewhat of a newbie, please bear with me on the following questions.

  • My general understanding after doing some reading on the mp3 format is that V0 is regarded as superior to 320 CBR. Why is that? I don't mean transparency or size/quality; I'm looking at it from a more technical point of view. Why wouldn't constantly encoding info at 320 bits be equal if not superior to a variable rate that fluctuates (V0 220-260)? One is cramming as much info as possible (even empty zeros) and one will strip out data according to an algo.

  • If I am going to use other lossy formats like AAC, , what is the generally recommended bit rate? Is it better to shoot for transparency or max out the bit rate?

  • Finally, I'm not a true hoarder, I believe less is more. However I've never really had a proper hardware set up; so I don't know if I would be able to tell the difference in quality between FLAC and mp3. So the only real good reason to keep lossless atm is transcoding. How likely are we to see a new development in next 10 years where having a 1:1 copy would be important? I would default to FLAC if not for the insane download bandwidth it takes and space/backup considerations.