Skip to main content

Notice

Please note that most of the software linked on this forum is likely to be safe to use. If you are unsure, feel free to ask in the relevant topics, or send a private message to an administrator or moderator. To help curb the problems of false positives, or in the event that you do find actual malware, you can contribute through the article linked here.
Topic: Building An Audio Library (Read 10286 times) previous topic - next topic
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Building An Audio Library

Reply #25
1. OpenBSD
    (gives me a bitrate quite similar to
    Garftuned -b999)

    I also have plenty of MP3s and MPCs
    lying 'round. :)


Building An Audio Library

Reply #27
Quote
WinXP - because its stable as hell and has support for just about every codec and for ease of use.

Man, i personaly believe thet EVERY M$ product ia as buggy as hell [but not everyone can see it] especialy when you try to customize it. The deeper you get with those customizations the often crashes appear. You fix one - two new are on their way...
Ok you install this very XP*******d OS for happy living thru next few years. But you're not happy with default configs, with default looking, with default behaviour etc. Maybe you should try to make some changes to suit your needs? Bad idea!
And lets not forget: the more software and drivers u install and uninstall... [know the rest]
They should write on the box: 'optimized for default user, any changes could impact your system and your emotional state'...
I think i could hang any past and coming M$ release with ease. You think i'm happy?

Sorry, i know you heard this song many times before and it's wrong place for such post but i just couldn't restrain myself :-)

1. WinXP, Win2k, Linux
2. NTFS
    :tunezartistcdtitletracktitle.ext
    :tunezartistcdtitle.m3u
    then scan it with winamp 'album list' plugin which gives pretty nice structure as result
3. CDRs [DVDRs in near future i hope ;-)]
4. vqf 96kbps, hq [earlier], now ogg -q 5,20-7,00, mpc -xtreme or -insane, psytel -normal or -archive [depends if i extract music for collection or because i love it].

Peace.

Building An Audio Library

Reply #28
Quote
Originally posted by ak
 
Man, i personaly believe thet EVERY M$ product ia as buggy as hell [but not everyone can see it] especialy when you try to customize it. The deeper you get with those customizations the often crashes appear. You fix one - two new are on their way...
Ok you install this very XP*******d OS for happy living thru next few years. But you're not happy with default configs, with default looking, with default behaviour etc. Maybe you should try to make some changes to suit your needs? Bad idea!
And lets not forget: the more software and drivers u install and uninstall... [know the rest]
They should write on the box: 'optimized for default user, any changes could impact your system and your emotional state'...
I think i could hang any past and coming M$ release with ease. You think i'm happy?


Just for the record -- I've customized my Windows XP installation quite a bit and so far it's been incredibly stable. 

Building An Audio Library

Reply #29
Quote
You make sure you put enough metadata into each file, to enable you to reconstruct the filename no matter what happens to it. This is easier in some formats than in others.


What exactly is metadata?

Building An Audio Library

Reply #30
Quote
Originally posted by Air_Borne
 
What exactly is metadata?


Tags.
I.E: ID3v1,v2

Building An Audio Library

Reply #31
1. Operating System Used
WinMe / Win2000

2. File System Layout 
c:mediamusicArtist LPACArtist_Number_Year_Album_Track_Title.pac
eg Rainbow_024_1978_Long Live Rock 'n' Roll_03_L. A. Connection.pac

c:mediamusicArtist MP3Number Title.mp3 + tags
eg 024 L. A. Connection.mp3

Generally only enocde a complete collection from an artist, hence use of the Number.

3. Backup system used (if any)
LPAC CD-R with some fangled scheam to combat 64 char file name limit

4. Codec preferred
Home Use - Original CD in decent HiFi
PC Use - Whatever I felt like at the time encoded from LPAC files
On The Move Use - MP3 3.91 -F --alt-preset standard
In An Ideal World I Would Like To Use - AAC -normal

Building An Audio Library

Reply #32
i would like to add..that it's an idea to make those mounted MP3 directories read only if possible..a separate file server could be useful for this..allowing read-only access to whatever user is reading from them...

Resons being windows viruses are pretty prevalent/easily spread etc and the last thing any one one wants  after countless hours of ripping is an insidious virus munching random bits all over the place.

Add a good surge protector to the above MP3 box and your set.


just my $0.2....

Building An Audio Library

Reply #33
1. Operating System Used
Server: Windows 2000, 30 GB (OS) & 100 GB (MP3) drives

Workstation: XP, 120 GB drive (to create/manipulate MP3s, play games, etc),  Logitech Z-560 speakers!

Portable: Archos Jukebox (20 GB)


2. File System Layout
Server: NTFS (all with ID3v2 only)
_VariousAlbumTrack#- Artist- Title.mp3 (for soundtracks and compilations)
ArtistAlbumArtist- Track#- Title.mp3
ArtistArtist- Title.mp3 (for individual songs)

Portable: FAT-32
GenreArtistTitle (Artist).mp3 (when I have a lot of one artist)
GenreTitle (Artist).mp3 (when I have only a few of that artist


3. Backup system used (if any)
Backup?  I don't need no steenkin' backup!
Seriously, duplicate hard drive (at friend's house, in his PC).  Soon, when I finished re-doing all 10,000 with LAME, I'll backup to 100+ blank CDR-s via 24x burner


4. Codec preferred
Server:
EAC/LAME alt-preset standard
(streamed over ethernet to 2 AudioTrons, and my workstation)

Portable:
EAC/LAME alt-preset CBR 128
(Archos has random skips over 160-bit, and 128 is a good tradeoff in size/space for a portable)
Glen
***********************************************
Whatever is not nailed down, is  mine.
Whatever I can pry loose... is not nailed down!

Building An Audio Library

Reply #34
1. WinXP

Two 80 gig hard drives RAID 0(they appear as one big drive to windows)

2. NTFS
C:My MusicArtistAlbumSong.mp3
otherwise C:My Music

3. No backups yet, tho i stored a backup of the mp3s i had on my laptop

4. MPC right now, maybe AAC later

Building An Audio Library

Reply #35
Win98SE

d:mp3Artist - Album (Year)Artist - Title.mp3
d:mp3Compilation (Year)Artist  - Title.mp3
Using only id3v2 tags

backup in 700 mb cd-r. (vivastar,verbatim,arita,tdk,emtec...)

Audiograbber, lame.dll (3.91), 256kbps, HQ, Stereo

Building An Audio Library

Reply #36
1. OS:
Client at WinNT4 (trying out WinXP).
Server at Linux.
Playing with WinAMP thru samba and web interface:
http://www.phazer.dk/musicdemo/

2. File System Layout (for management)
artist/album (year)/NN track

3. Backup system used (if any)
Original CD or .ape + CDR

4. Codec preferred
Ogg around 320 kbps

Building An Audio Library

Reply #37
1. Win2000, XP, Linux

2. One of the following:
w:/media.256/Pink Floyd/Relics/01 - Arnold Layne.mp3
w:/media.256/Various Artists/Pure Reggae/01 - Bob Marley & The Wailers - Stir It Up.mp3
On Linux, you might have problems with certain signs in the file name.


3. buy another hard drive, make an exact copy. It is cheaper, safer, and faster than CDR. I had some bad experience with firewire enclosures, where data got corrupt (no idea why, the same IDE drive works fine on the normal system IDE port).

4. Use CBR with 256. With the Lame encoder, I doubt seriously that there is a reason for somebody to use 320. If you have too much hard disk space, use a lossless compression codec.

I wrote a small Perl script to re-convert my MP3's to a smaller format, when I go on the road with the music, I will attach the file contents in this message.
If there are people interested in seeing other features to this, I would be happy to turn it into a web-based encoding tool

===============
#!perl -w
$SourceDirectory = 'w:/media.256';
$TargetDirectory = 'w:/media.130';

$Params    = qq~--alt-preset 130 --add-id3v2~;

WorkDir();

sub WorkDir {
  my $file;
  my $DX = shift || $SourceDirectory;
  my $TX = shift || $TargetDirectory;
  opendir (DIR, $DX) or die "Can't open dir: '$DX'.nReason: $!";
  my @ls = readdir(DIR);
  closedir (DIR);
  FILE: foreach $file (@ls) {
    next FILE if  $file eq '.' || $file eq '..';
    my $Source = "$DX/$file";
    my $Target = "$TX/$file";
    if (-d $Source) {
      if (! -e $Target) {
        mkdir ($Target, 0777) or die "Could not create the target directory: $Target";
      }
      WorkDir($Source, $Target);
      next FILE;
    };
    EncodeFile($Source, $Target);
    die "Encode failed on: $Target" if ! -e $Target;
  }
}

sub EncodeFile {
  my $source = shift;
  my $target = shift;
  use MP3::Info;
  my $tag = get_mp3tag($source) or die "No TAG info";
  my @MP3Params = qw(TITLE YEAR ARTIST ALBUM GENRE TRACKNUM COMMENT);
  foreach (@MP3Params) {
    die if ! exists $tag->{$_};
    $tag->{$_} =~ s/"/'/g;
  }
  $Params .= qq~ --tt "$tag->{'TITLE'}"~;
  $Params .= qq~ --ty "$tag->{'YEAR'}"~;
  $Params .= qq~ --ta "$tag->{'ARTIST'}"~;
  $Params .= qq~ --tl "$tag->{'ALBUM'}"~;
  $Params .= qq~ --tg "$tag->{'GENRE'}"~;
  $Params .= qq~ --tn "$tag->{'TRACKNUM'}"~;
  $Params .= qq~ --tc "$tag->{'COMMENT'}"~;
  $source =~ s////g;
  $target =~ s////g;
  `lame $Params "$source" "$target"`;
}

Building An Audio Library

Reply #38
Quote
Originally posted by NickSD


Just for the record -- I've customized my Windows XP installation quite a bit and so far it's been incredibly stable. 


Same here.  I'm a reconfig junkie, none of the defaults work too well for me.  Ak must be doings something horribly wrong, or just flat-out anti-MS and spouting what he's heard from others.  NT4.0  Server and  Workstation on all kinds of hardware have bean wonderful.  2K just made life easier, and now I'm running XP Pro on my Workstation so I can get something resembling decent performance with my Radeon 8500. 

XP is actually the fastest, prettiest thing I've used, and I love the new Start menu that keeps my most recently used apps in a short list.  Once I discovered that you could toggle the quicklaunch section I was completely happy.  It looks more GNUish or Macish than the traditional hard-edged Windows feel.

On-Topic

Win2K server 9GB OS, 75GB on two drives using dfs mapping.

I've got 850 CD's online so genre sorting is a must, though I've done that since the beginning.
Drive Letter:GenreArtist - Album NameSong.mpc

Playlists from the original CD order are stored in:
Drive Letter:GenreArtist - Album Name.m3u

Backups will soon be done as Nightmedia suggests on two 120GB drives using a simple IDE RAID card at RAID level 1.

I use Musepack -xtreme which puts my average bitrate around 200Kbps and works better than my old Bladenc 256Kbps MP3 standard.  I don't care about mobile playback and have a 30' fiber run off my PC to my Denon 3802 in the living room for playback.

G

Building An Audio Library

Reply #39
NT 4 was a horrible OS. I still think it better than the 9x series Windows for the most part.  The only thing that the 9x series had over  NT 4 was that it was a bit better hardware and game compatability. Other than that the 9x series sucked. 2000 quietly and secretly stole more features from the UNIXs than NT4 had and was a step in the right direction. XP is pure, unadulterated, 100% uncut, gratuitous hype! They stole some more features form the UNIXs for XP but none of them were life changing or ground breaking in any way. If you run XP it is only prety 2000. If you payed for XP Microsoft ripped you off royally.

Just for the record.

Workstation:
Pirated XP, QNX, BeOS, and Linux

Server:
Linux
Reiser FS journalised filesystem
/music/Artist Name/Album Name/Artist - Album - Track Num - Title.OGG

The actual layout does not matter because I can symlink it however I like.

All files are q 5 and the server is connected directly to my sterio. All files may be accessed over my lan via SAMBA. And the system is controlled via VNC.

Building An Audio Library

Reply #40
Quote
Originally posted by Neo Neko
NT 4 was a horrible OS. I still think it better than the 9x series Windows for the most part.  The only thing that the 9x series had over  NT 4 was that it was a bit better hardware and game compatability. Other than that the 9x series sucked. 2000 quietly and secretly stole more features from the UNIXs than NT4 had and was a step in the right direction. XP is pure, unadulterated, 100% uncut, gratuitous hype! They stole some more features form the UNIXs for XP but none of them were life changing or ground breaking in any way. If you run XP it is only prety 2000.


I do not wish to start a flame war over Windows, as it will leed nowhere. However, a few details:

Windows NT4 is the perfect OS for an office enviroment. With the right hardware, it runs fast and stable. It only needs two small modifications to make it run ok (disable server and fixed swap.file). It will play several 2D games better than 9X/ME (i.e. Diablo2). But it cannot play DivX movies at an acceptable quality (not with my hardware anyway). Win9X can.

Both Win2000 and XP are build on the NT system. They identify themselves as NT5.0 and NT5.5. There is IMHO a vast difference between these systems.

1. General performance: Both comes with around 30 services started. There is very little performance gain from disabling 20 of them under XP, but a huge gain under 2000 (like 40%).

2. XP has way better hardware support:
XP comes with a SB Live driver, that supports digital out. 2000 does not and you have to install LiveWare from Creative. LiveWare does not work with two CPUs (error not fixed 18 months after Win2000 was released). So basically you cannot use Win2000 with SBLive and 2 CPUs (unless you don't desire digital out).
XP plays DivX fine with a Matrox G400 graphic card. Win2000 plays just as bad as WinNT4 (on my system anyway).

3. Stability: Win2000 managed to crash 6 times in 7 days (then I killed it). XP crashed once in one week (after I killed both EAC.exe and explorer.exe).

Win2000/XP compared to NT4 (on my computer (dual P3-450 + SCSI only + MGA400): NT4 more stable and better performance for non-graphic work. NT4 can rip CDs and stream from a samba server flawlessly. XP chokes on the stream and Win2000 dies from ripping...

Building An Audio Library

Reply #41
I was not spouting one system over the other. I was simply making a statement of fact internal to the Microsoft OSes. Windows 2000 = NT5, Windows XP = NT5.1 not 5.5. There is very little difference between 2000 and XP. It is just that since Microsoft is now pushing their office space OS on indifferent home users that a few companies are supporting it who did not support 2000. You are talking about SB cards and in your instance it could be true. But my Audigy ran very well under 2000 and XP does not do anything better. There are many pieces of hardware that had excelent drivers under 2000 that have nothing under XP. Many of my favorite programs that worked under 2000 if installed under XP will destroy the system and almost surely require a clean re-install.(See PGP) After installing PGP the system became almost completly un-usable and I was not able to do a system recovery. Damn when did that feature ever work correctly. And there is other software that does the exact same thing. XP might run a bit better on your system than 2000 but that is the exception and not the rule. XP is just a ploy by the worlds ritchest company and people for more money. What they should have given out as a free upgrade to all those running 2000 they charge out the ass for and you still do not own your copy. They do, and not only that, once you have your copy installed they effectively own that part of your PC. Read that XP license in depth and you will find plenty at fault.

When it comes to non Microsoft OS I use many of em and would not specifically recommend one over the other. It would all depend on aplication and the user involved. But the thing is that they at least are fair to their users and try to get along with everyone else unlike Microsoft.

As I said this is not some sort of an OS war thing it is a simple statement of fact. No where did I say "Windows sucks! So and so rules!". Just for the record.

Building An Audio Library

Reply #42
Quote
Originally posted by Neo Neko
I was not spouting one system over the other. I was simply making a statement of fact internal to the Microsoft OSes. Windows 2000 = NT5, Windows XP = NT5.1 not 5.5. There is very little difference between 2000 and XP. It is just that since Microsoft is now pushing their office space OS on indifferent home users that a few companies are supporting it who did not support 2000. You are talking about SB cards and in your instance it could be true. But my Audigy ran very well under 2000 and XP does not do anything better. There are many pieces of hardware that had excelent drivers under 2000 that have nothing under XP. Many of my favorite programs that worked under 2000 if installed under XP will destroy the system and almost surely require a clean re-install.(See PGP) After installing PGP the system became almost completly un-usable and I was not able to do a system recovery. Damn when did that feature ever work correctly. And there is other software that does the exact same thing. XP might run a bit better on your system than 2000 but that is the exception and not the rule. XP is just a ploy by the worlds ritchest company and people for more money. What they should have given out as a free upgrade to all those running 2000 they charge out the ass for and you still do not own your copy. They do, and not only that, once you have your copy installed they effectively own that part of your PC. Read that XP license in depth and you will find plenty at fault.

When it comes to non Microsoft OS I use many of em and would not specifically recommend one over the other. It would all depend on aplication and the user involved. But the thing is that they at least are fair to their users and try to get along with everyone else unlike Microsoft.

As I said this is not some sort of an OS war thing it is a simple statement of fact. No where did I say "Windows sucks! So and so rules!". Just for the record.


The one thing MS is doing with XP, that they haven't done in the past is provide a single architecture for developers going forward.  2000 moving to XP isn't a totally necessary move.  I did it because ATI's drivers under 2K perform horribly.  Otherwise I wouldn't have bothered.  I like 2K just fine and it's wonderfully stable.  XP certainly doesn't add much there.

XP Home adds some wonderful features for home users, and while some apps specifically written for older architectures might not work, the stability in general is what most home users and MS bashers have been looking for.  There again, it's not necessarily an "upgrade" I'd recommend as much as something to make sure you have with newer hardware, unless you're willing to live with the instability that is the 9X line.

As for the licensing, for most people getting it with a new computer it doesn't make that big a deal.  They get to use it, it runs (better than any previous home software from MS), and if MS pulled something like a forced upgrade by revoking licensing down the road I don't think anybody would stand for it, least of all the courts.  If MS was that stupid, I think we'd see a mass migration to LINUX or something similar.  Call them anything you want, but their behavior is still limited by public reactions.  The licensing scheme for XP, both OS and Office, was changed after the first released draft because of user outrage, especially from the business sector as I understand it.

I can however, certainly understand your frustration with the driver and software issues.  My piecemeal upgrade cycle means that all the hardware in my PC stays about a year old or less and was fully supported by XP right out of the box, so it was headache free for me.  It must be great for companies like Symantec though since most of their older software is OS specific due to the OS integration.

Building An Audio Library

Reply #43
Quote
Originally posted by Annuka


I do not wish to start a flame war over Windows, as it will leed nowhere. However, a few details:

Windows NT4 is the perfect OS for an office enviroment. With the right hardware, it runs fast and stable. It only needs two small modifications to make it run ok (disable server and fixed swap.file). It will play several 2D games better than 9X/ME (i.e. Diablo2). But it cannot play DivX movies at an acceptable quality (not with my hardware anyway). Win9X can.

Both Win2000 and XP are build on the NT system. They identify themselves as NT5.0 and NT5.5. There is IMHO a vast difference between these systems. 

1. General performance: Both comes with around 30 services started. There is very little performance gain from disabling 20 of them under XP, but a huge gain under 2000 (like 40%).

2. XP has way better hardware support: 
XP comes with a SB Live driver, that supports digital out. 2000 does not and you have to install LiveWare from Creative. LiveWare does not work with two CPUs (error not fixed 18 months after Win2000 was released). So basically you cannot use Win2000 with SBLive and 2 CPUs (unless you don't desire digital out).
XP plays DivX fine with a Matrox G400 graphic card. Win2000 plays just as bad as WinNT4 (on my system anyway).

3. Stability: Win2000 managed to crash 6 times in 7 days (then I killed it). XP crashed once in one week (after I killed both EAC.exe and explorer.exe).

Win2000/XP compared to NT4 (on my computer (dual P3-450 + SCSI only + MGA400): NT4 more stable and better performance for non-graphic work. NT4 can rip CDs and stream from a samba server flawlessly. XP chokes on the stream and Win2000 dies from ripping...


This all sounds more like app issues than OS issues.  I use audiograbber for ripping and it has worked flawlessly with NT4, 2K and XP, as well as with 9X series OS's.

Under the NT kernel the only things that should kill the kernel iself would be poorly written drivers or poorly written apps with low-level acces to the kernel.  Games given more low-level access to hardware also have the potential to lock-up an NT based system, though give any app low-level access with any OS, MS or 'NIX and you're allowing for trouble.

With good hardware and good drivers, applications dying in their own memory space is the only issue I encounter.  Unlike the 9X series I don't have to reboot after an app dies to ensure stability. 

Here's a tip you may not know.  If explorer (the user shell, not the file browser) dies on you and doesn't resuscitate itself, you can actually hit ctrl-alt-delete open the task manager, run a new task on the file menu and type "explorer" as the app.  Wallah, GUI back up, no need to reboot.

Also, for Neo Neko, as someone who paid for XP, I don't consider myself as having been ripped off.  Since I'm self-employed and this is my business system, actually owning the license prevents me from being liable for the $10K fines you can be hit with per incident of software piracy in the US.  No matter how you cut it or attempt to justify it, in most countries, it is theft.  I personally like to sleep at night knowing that in the event of an audit I'm covered.  Bragging that you run a pirated copy of XP on a public forum doesn't strike me as being the most intelligent thing you could do either.  I used to pass around copies of software with my friends so I don't feel bound by it, but it's technically anyone's civic duty to report known incidents of software piracy.  Hope you don't have any enemieshere, or there aren't any MS employess floating around this forum.

G

Building An Audio Library

Reply #44
Quote
Ak must be doings something horribly wrong, or just flat-out anti-MS and spouting what he's heard from others.

Well, i'd never start this weeping if i didn't face those crashes periodicaly.
Last one was: 'cant read (or find, or write to) hive windowssystem32sofware' after restart. HDD is almost new tho (bought some months ago).
So obviously i must be doing something wrong. Not so obvious tho what exactly.

P.S Now i feel myself such an XPerienced lamer. :flipoff: :evilgrin:

 

Building An Audio Library

Reply #45
Quote
Originally posted by ak
 
Well, i'd never start this weeping if i didn't face those crashes periodicaly.
Last one was: 'cant read (or find, or write to) hive windowssystem32sofware' after restart. HDD is almost new tho (bought some months ago).
So obviously i must be doing something wrong. Not so obvious tho what exactly.

P.S Now i feel myself such an XPerienced lamer. :flipoff: :evilgrin:


Ooooh, that one.  Contact MS about it.  My parents' Win2K machine started doing that and after contacting IBM and blaming things on their drive they informed me that there's a timing issue with 2K (and possibly XP) where windows will kill the power at shutdown before the drives have finished writing data.  Over time this supposedly corrupts data.  It's a known issue, there is a hotfix available, and it will be included in SP3 for 2K.  To get things going again IBM had me low-level format the drive (it failed their test software and reported bad sectors) and then reinstall the OS.  At the moment I'm not sure where the real blame lies since IBM has had some notoriously bad drive lines and failed to fess up to the issues, but I also recognize that MS doesn't write perfect code either.  In my experience though, bad sectors are a physical error, and aren't caused by software, so I don't know what to really think.  Maybe a little from column A and a little from column B.  I never shut mine down except for maintenance, so that issue is a moot point for me anyways.

The age of the HD is no guaranteee though.  Some of the models in IBM's 75GXP line had a higher than average failure rate, and many people had issues in the first two months or so.  No matter how stringent their quality control, every manufacturer produces a lemon now and then.  It could be that you just got a bum drive.  Check your manufacturer's website for a diagnostic utility and give it a spin (pun intended).  If your drive has developed a louder than normal idle noise (often a high pitched whine) or has louder or odd sounding seek chatter, things could be heading South in the drive and might not show up in a diagnostic.  High pitched whines that suddenly pop-up are usually bearing problems and will be accompanied by attrocious performance as the problem grows.

G

 
SimplePortal 1.0.0 RC1 © 2008-2021