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Topic: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming? (Read 1035 times) previous topic - next topic
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Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Hello,
I have a lot CDs at home I collected over the years and I thought about converting all of them to FLAC. However, I read on certain websites that converting CDs is now considered an outdated method of listening  to music. I know that FLAC is future-proof because it is an open and documented format and even if there are no big differences between MP3 320kbp and FLAC in terms of sound, I think from an archival standpoint FLAC makes more sense. Do you still collect CDs and archive them on your computer? or you are just using the streaming services now?

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #1
As this an audio enthusiasts' enclave, you will probably a lot of confirmation for sticking with your own physical/ripped FLAC collection. (As I am mainting one myself.)

But in the end, this is not something where you should be taking the advice of random strangers too seriously. After all, this is a hobby, and you should follow your own preferences. Some take joy in meticulously tagging, rating and filing our files. Others prefer the no-fuss streaming experience that saves them hours of crate digging.

For "important" releases, I invest into a physical copy, either CD or sometimes vinyl (not playback, more for the large cover art print), just to be able to showcase and handle the object. Do you need any of this? Only you can decide that.

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #2
this is a hobby, and you should follow your own preferences. Some take joy in meticulously tagging, rating and filing our files.

This.

I may be old school but like to have music files on local disk. Never used any of streaming services and I probably won't use it. I like having my own music collection and ability to have full control of files, like to move, copy, rename, transfer, tag, is a big plus for me.
Somewhere, there's someone dying in a foreign land
Meanwhile, the world is crying stupidity of man
Tell me why, tell me why

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #3
I definitely find CD's and rip them to FLAC, because then I can convert to any format I want for any reason I want, and I can also do whatever when I have the true audio data in my possession.
Don't think it's outdated at all when the sound can still be excellent (depending on the mastering and original recording), plus when you rip it you can have it anywhere.

But as others have said, do what you will.

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #4
I still buy CDs and rip them to FLAC.  I sometimes use streaming services to check out new music, but I often find that albums can be mislabeled, incomplete, or disappear from the service.  With music from my own collection, I never have to worry about listening to music interrupted by ads or needing an Internet connection (on the go).

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #5
I collect FLAC files and store them on my PC. Not a whole album but the music I love the most. I still have a subscription to Deezer/Tidal/Qobuz.
Collecting FLAC files is a hobby for me.
In 2019, I created 20+ playlists on my Deezer account. After a year I don't find some songs from those playlists. Deezer removed some songs for some reason. The same thing happened to me with my Tidal playlist in 2018.
That is why I collect all the songs I love.

Right now no giant corporation uses MP3 anymore. Like YouTube uses Opus (160kbps). Spotify uses (Vorbis 320kbps & FLAC), Facebook uses Vorbis (110kbps), Deezer and Tidal use FLAC.

I was using Qaac (q127) for daily listening but I've started to listen to Opus (vbr 320). That's the advantage of collecting FLAC. I can convert them to whatever codec I want and save some space on my phone.

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #6
Who wants to support some unethical corporations that overcharge customers and underpay artists? I buy used CDs and resell them on Discogs, so I make money, albeit at the cost of some time. I'm more familiar with my collection and my music than I would be just streaming it. Besides, one can stream one's own collection and still subscribe to some service or the other. Me, I'm too frugal, I'll do almost anything not to have another monthly bill. https://www.discogs.com/user/2tec/collection
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?  ;~)

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #7
I have music that my friends made and music that I've made myself. That doesn't go on a streaming service.
That aside, I think there is some value in having at least some music that is very valuable to you, as a digital copy on a storage medium that only you have control over.
We see things with video streaming platforms, where some movies and series simply vanish and end up difficult to find. There is no reason why this might not also happen to audio streaming platforms, too.

There is some audio content, which I feel I must have full control over myself. And since audio files don't take up much space and are very easy to handle, there is almost no cost in doing that, so why not?

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #8
Who wants to support some unethical corporations that overcharge customers and underpay artists? I buy used CDs and resell them on Discogs, so I make money,
ummmm so you're not just underpaying the artists (i.e. zilch) you're making a profit out of them

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #9
I may be old school but like to have music files on local disk. Never used any of streaming services and I probably won't use it. I like having my own music collection and ability to have full control of files, like to move, copy, rename, transfer, tag, is a big plus for me.
Damn, I could have written this entire post, word by word! ;)

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #10
Yes, I still rip CDs or buy lossless files (and occasionally other physical formats) and don't subscribe to any streaming service. Sure, part of it is the mere hobby of collecting physical objects and the pleasure of having all the info and artwork in the booklet.

But it's also about spending your budget on specific artists and releases rather than yet another intermediary, and about wanting to preserve (access to) the music. With streaming platforms, as Replica9000 mentioned above, you never know when or why they might alter certain works or stop offering them altogether, raise the subscription fees etcetera. You get disputes between artists and labels, between labels and streaming services, censorship, copyright disputes with uncleared sampling and so on. But I'm pretty sure no one will come and seize your personal copy.

Re: Is it still worth having your own music collection in the era of streaming?

Reply #11
Who wants to support some unethical corporations that overcharge customers and underpay artists? I buy used CDs and resell them on Discogs, so I make money,
ummmm so you're not just underpaying the artists (i.e. zilch) you're making a profit out of them
LOL, mainstream artists have way too much, most other musicians way too little, besides I pay for my music, new or used. No one is being underpaid here except the poor and I hardly see published artists as poor unless they have poor money management skills; but hey, nice try. (Not to mention I add my local artists to Discogs and sell their music for them online.)

Besides reselling and conserving is sustainable. I'm just pointing out it's too bad copyright has been so unreasonably extended, much to the detriment of the public's domain. (Not to mention it's the transnational corporations that are gaining and it's the artists and the public who are losing.) Just saying.

Bob Dylan sells catalog for $200 million ~ https://www.castanet.net/edition/news-story-357971-8-.htm
Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?  ;~)