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1
I'm sorry that I'm making a topic about 3 separate questions but I don't think they deserve separate topics for each.
So I've been having some ideas that come together with some questions.

1. What kind of technical advantages did they apply to DCC format (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Compact_Cassette) that made it possible to carry digital audio into a tape that a regular tape as a physical format (TYPE II or III let's say) can't do? I mean if you would use the same type of modulation and recording speed wouldn't you be able to store digital audio on a regular tape? I'm really trying to find a way to store digital audio on a tape as a project but the modulation methods available and the software available for storing digital data on tapes is not enough to achieve the robustness and the bitrate required for such project. Also I wasn't able to find enough documentation on the format which makes such project even harder)

DCC implemented an early kind of lossy or perceptually-based encoding.  As computational power per dollar increased, and more was discovered about the natural insensitivity of the human ear to certain sounds in certain circumstances, it was possible to have better sound quality using less space on the media. Of course, media density and flexibility also improved vastly.

If you haven't noticed, flash memory is eating optical media's lunch and doubling its already good price/performance every few years.

If you can't find what you need along these lines of data compression and media data density in current technology, maybe its time to revisit your requirements.   It is highly unlikely that a student is going to meaningfully improve these areas.

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2. How come there was never a competitor to redbook CDs that actually uses somekind of lossless compression (let's say like DVD-A can use Meridian Lossless). I do get that it would mean that they wouldn't be backwards/redbook compatible but it's not like other competing formats were. There would be so many advantages, especially compared to rival formats, like:
*The actual hardware part of the reader is the cheapest one out of all the competitors and it's going to be present either way on the device that reads the actual disc.

There are all kinds of competing technologies in this area, and many of them are very good. A lot of them are about as free as free can be.  However, this market naturally became very fragmented. The number of potential competitors is vast and the market has not decided on just one or even just a few.

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*The medium is also the cheapest one compared to SACD discs and DVDs

I don't see any evidence that it costs appreciably more to make DVDs than CDs. The economies of scale favor whatever sells the fastest. It appears that all optical media, pressed or recordable is a declining market. Real-time downloads and flash memory are ascending or at least holding their own. It is a buyer's market.

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*Compressing the audio data would open the gate to compete directly with SACDs by offering higher sampling rates, higher bit depths or even longer playtimes.

SACD and DVD-A were solutions looking for a problem. There is no known audio sound quality problem with the Redbook CD other than perhaps lack of discrete channels. OTOH stereo seems to have a heck of a lot of life in it, still.  Proving that a sound quality problem exists should be very easy as the tools for doing so are readily available and again about as free as free gets, but nobody seems to be able to do it. Of course there is tons of anecdotal opinion otherwise, but can we all say "Placebo"? ;-)

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*Longer playtimes would eliminate the extra costs for more pressings with multiple discs that might not be needed.

Irrelevant. If you look at where the market is going, namely downloads and streaming, there is no bankable demand for media with longer play times.  Downloads and streaming are selling partially based on the fact that they distribute music in other ways than long playing prepackaged media. I don't see any market for longer playtimes at all.

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*Ability to include more metadata.

Ditto.

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*Ability to introduce some kind of strong(er than redbook technology) copy protection on the disc.

Ditto. Copy protection has always been a red herring because all known forms of copy protection are fairly trivial to  circumvent.

Forcing the digital music back into the analog domain is about as far as one can practically go with copy protection, and hardware and software that effectively circumvents that issue is readily available, has lots of trained users, and is highly effective.

2
About the capacity of the old tape there where datalogers in the late 80s that where capable of storing about 60MB in a standard 90' tape, or around 90Kbps, today using more advanced modulation techniques in a stereo tape is possible to double this to near 120MB 90' tape (190Kbps) using a quality deck, but going fancy building a deck where the head and is drivers are special designed to be connected to the DACs/ADCs and some precision control motors this can be pushed to 160MB 90' tape (248Kbps). This last option is similar to the approach of the DCC, after all more than magic the secret was math and enginering.
Any link to any tools and documentation for such thing? In theory alot can be possible but I haven't been able to find solid proof for such thing, like some kind of command line app that modulates the audio.
3
Opus / Re: OpusCut
Last post by VEG -
Oh, it seems that there is a topic with the same subject: https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php/topic,113498.0.html. Maybe it is better to join these topics.

I see that there is a solution, but I think that it will be much better to include such tool into the Opus Tools bundle. But there is no such plans for the future :( https://wiki.xiph.org/OpusTodo
4
Opus / OpusCut
Last post by VEG -
It seems that Opus lacks lossless cutting support. Sometimes it is a very useful thing. Now I'm using Ogg Vorbis, and I use vcut.exe to cut long periods of silence at the end of a track, and to split a file to several files when the source file had several tracks inside. It works really lossless for Vorbis when vcut is used, I had checked it.

Is there any solution for these tasks for Opus? It would be nice to have opuscut.exe in addition to opusenc.exe/opusdec.exe/opusinfo.exe in the Opus Tools bundle.
5
Chimera(foo_video) Ver.0.4.0.0
"Local Video Player" renamed to "Chimera".

[add]Support the madVR.
[add]Add to Advanced Option(Delay) for EVR and madVR
[change]When load video in succession, keep a video window.
[change]When load [.flv] files, play video.
[fix]Fix to small bags.
[fix]Slight adjustment for Stable Build.

Download
http://fucrowrabbit.sakura.ne.jp/foo_video/index_foo_video.html

Author:FuCrowRabbit
Twitter:@FuCrowRabbit
6
Hi John.

I just tried several 5.1 and stereo AIFF files in fb2k and they seem to be working fine on my end.
Therefore, I suspect there might be something "special" to those B&W files.

Could you please use MediaInfo to analyse any of those files and post back the result ?
https://mediaarea.net/en/MediaInfo

One of my 5.1 files for example  looks like this:
Code: [Select]
General 
Complete name : E:\_Encoding_\51MIX_out.aif
Format : AIFF
Format/Info : Apple/SGI
File size : 61.0 MiB
Duration : 1 min 14 s
Overall bit rate mode : Constant
Overall bit rate : 6 912 kb/s

Audio
Format : PCM
Format settings, Endianness : Big
Duration : 1 min 14 s
Bit rate mode : Constant
Bit rate : 6 912 kb/s
Channel(s) : 6 channels
Sampling rate : 48.0 kHz
Bit depth : 24 bits
Stream size : 61.0 MiB (100%)
Cheers!
Maggi
7
2. How come there was never a competitor to redbook CDs that actually uses somekind of lossless compression (let's say like DVD-A can use Meridial Lossless).

By the time the hardware was available to do something like that cost-effectively, CDs were so completely entrenched that there was no room for an alternative format. 


I am not so sure of that. About when could Shorten be decoded in real-time? One could very well have dumped audio files to a data CD-ROM.
But I cannot imagine industry support - rather, one would have to expect major costs fighting the RIAA back then when they tried to restrict audio-on-CD-R to very special hardware and media.

That said, there were audio formats on physical Red Book CDDAs: DSD-CD and DTS-CD (both lossy, but the latter at least had something to offer in multichannel). And there was even sort-of one lossless format: HDCD. As good as backwards compatible (at some dynamic compression), as good as lossless (remember that dithering down to 16 bits is not a lossless operation in any case), gained at least some momentum - and then disappeared.



There would be so many advantages, especially compared to rival formats, like:
*The actual hardware part of the reader is the cheapest one out of all the competitors and it's going to be present either way on the device that reads the actual disc.
*The medium is also the cheapest one compared to SACD discs and DVDs
*Compressing the audio data would open the gate to compete directly with SACDs by offering higher sampling rates, higher bit depths or even longer playtimes.
*Longer playtimes would eliminate the extra costs for more pressings with multiple discs that might not be needed.
*Ability to include more metadata.
*Ability to introduce somekind of strong(er than redbook technology) copy protection on the disc.

* Sure, CD drives were once much cheaper than DVD drives. But then the industry started to push the DVD format.  Both players and discs (rewritables in a format war, and ...)
* I can hardly imagine that the price difference between pressed DVD and pressed CD matters anything nowadays.  Not even sure what is the cheapest. But one actually tried what you suggest for video formats, which were then killed by the DVD.
* The SACD is expensive because it is a niche product, not because it is technically extremely complex. And it is a niche product because there was not - at the time - demand for hi-rez. (Maybe now there is.) And certainly not copy-protected.
* Longer playtimes? The industry seems not to want that. I don't think they want to sell you a DVD with ten CDs on.
* Metadata? CD-Text! And if one had wanted more, it could have been implemented in CD-Extra and a specification of a metadata text file format. So there was evidently not enough demand for it within a format that did sell - and even less for a format that did not exist.
* Copy protection? They did just that! Introduced non-CDDA-compliant hacks to physical CDs, pissing on and off their paying customers by ruining error correction - and then gave it up because it offered no real value added. And at the same time, they tried to push formats with even stronger copy protection, and arguably that is another reason why the DVD-based formats failed.
8
Whether or not sub sonic frequencies can be perceived, it is more likely to be so than weak, directional +20khz frequencies which vinyl fanbois bang on about.

Not to mention that there is no way that response at 20 Hz and below can be accurately reproduced by a LP.
9
3rd Party Plugins - (fb2k) / Re: [Not My Release] EsPlaylist
Last post by Coreda -
Here's a link to the component if you still need it.
esplaylist

Thanks. It's actually for when linking to others. Found that archive.org has the page and zip files archived so I think I'll use that for now.
10
About the capacity of the old tape there where datalogers in the late 80s that where capable of storing about 60MB in a standard 90' tape, or around 90Kbps, today using more advanced modulation techniques in a stereo tape is possible to double this to near 120MB 90' tape (190Kbps) using a quality deck, but going fancy building a deck where the head and is drivers are special designed to be connected to the DACs/ADCs and some precision control motors this can be pushed to 160MB 90' tape (248Kbps). This last option is similar to the approach of the DCC, after all more than magic the secret was math and enginering.