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Topic: Lyra: AI powered speech codec from Google (Read 776 times) previous topic - next topic
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Lyra: AI powered speech codec from Google

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Lyra is a high-quality, very low-bitrate speech codec that makes voice communication available even on the slowest networks. To do this, we’ve applied traditional codec techniques while leveraging advances in machine learning (ML) with models trained on thousands of hours of data to create a novel method for compressing and transmitting voice signals.

Lyra Overview
The basic architecture of the Lyra codec is quite simple. Features, or distinctive speech attributes, are extracted from speech every 40ms and are then compressed for transmission. The features themselves are log mel spectrograms, a list of numbers representing the speech energy in different frequency bands, which have traditionally been used for their perceptual relevance because they are modeled after human auditory response. On the other end, a generative model uses those features to recreate the speech signal. In this sense, Lyra is very similar to other traditional parametric codecs, such as MELP.

However traditional parametric codecs, which simply extract from speech critical parameters that can then be used to recreate the signal at the receiving end, achieve low bitrates, but often sound robotic and unnatural. These shortcomings have led to the development of a new generation of high-quality audio generative models that have revolutionized the field by being able to not only differentiate between signals, but also generate completely new ones. DeepMind’s WaveNet was the first of these generative models that paved the way for many to come. Additionally, WaveNetEQ, the generative model-based packet-loss-concealment system currently used in Duo, has demonstrated how this technology can be used in real-world scenarios.

A New Approach to Compression with Lyra
Using these models as a baseline, we’ve developed a new model capable of reconstructing speech using minimal amounts of data. Lyra harnesses the power of these new natural-sounding generative models to maintain the low bitrate of parametric codecs while achieving high quality, on par with state-of-the-art waveform codecs used in most streaming and communication platforms today. The drawback of waveform codecs is that they achieve this high quality by compressing and sending over the signal sample-by-sample, which requires a higher bitrate and, in most cases, isn’t necessary to achieve natural sounding speech.

One concern with generative models is their computational complexity. Lyra avoids this issue by using a cheaper recurrent generative model, a WaveRNN variation, that works at a lower rate, but generates in parallel multiple signals in different frequency ranges that it later combines into a single output signal at the desired sample rate. This trick enables Lyra to not only run on cloud servers, but also on-device on mid-range phones in real time (with a processing latency of 90ms, which is in line with other traditional speech codecs). This generative model is then trained on thousands of hours of speech data and optimized, similarly to WaveNet, to accurately recreate the input audio.

Comparison with Existing Codecs
Since the inception of Lyra, our mission has been to provide the best quality audio using a fraction of the bitrate data of alternatives. Currently, the royalty-free open-source codec Opus, is the most widely used codec for WebRTC-based VOIP applications and, with audio at 32kbps, typically obtains transparent speech quality, i.e., indistinguishable from the original. However, while Opus can be used in more bandwidth constrained environments down to 6kbps, it starts to demonstrate degraded audio quality. Other codecs are capable of operating at comparable bitrates to Lyra (Speex, MELP, AMR), but each suffer from increased artifacts and result in a robotic sounding voice.

Lyra is currently designed to operate at 3kbps and listening tests show that Lyra outperforms any other codec at that bitrate and is compared favorably to Opus at 8kbps, thus achieving more than a 60% reduction in bandwidth. Lyra can be used wherever the bandwidth conditions are insufficient for higher-bitrates and existing low-bitrate codecs do not provide adequate quality.

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It looks like this is no longer an audio "codec" - it's basically the AI to recognize speech and synthesize it which is simply amazing. Perhaps future video codecs will work similarly. NVIDIA has already created a working AI powered video codec for video conferences which requires a much lower bitrate than standard codecs.

Re: Lyra: AI powered speech codec from Google

Reply #1
I am not quite confident in having the world’s leading adware company’s AI analyze speech being a good idea.
audiophile // FLAC and Opus user // using too many audio players

 

 
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