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Topic: Eq presets - Please give your professional advice (Read 2002 times) previous topic - next topic
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Eq presets - Please give your professional advice

Hi,
I want to show you the preset I use for my Altec-Lansing speakers (2 + subwoofer).
I just want to know if it's badly made in the sense of clipping sound.
I've heard lots of things about it, that we should cut frequencies instead of boost them.
What's the real difference of both things?
Could you give me some advice of how to make a good eq preset?
I am not talking about the frequencies to change but the way to make it.
Thanks

Link here:
http://img89.imageshack.us/img89/8881/eqdw5.jpg

Eq presets - Please give your professional advice

Reply #1
Boosting certain frequency bands may lead to clipping. As your maximum boost on any slider is +6dB, lower all sliders by 6dB so they all sit below 0dB.

Cheers, Slipstreem. 

 

Eq presets - Please give your professional advice

Reply #2
Quote
As your maximum boost on any slider is +6dB, lower all sliders by 6dB so they all sit below 0dB.
  Right...  Keep the same EQ "shape", but with the sliders lowered.

Quote
I just want to know if it's badly made in the sense of clipping sound.  I've heard lots of things about it, that we should cut frequencies instead of boost them.
  It depends on the combination of your EQ and volume settings.  In your situation where you may be using some digital gain reduction, it might not be a problem.  Are you hearing any distortion? 

...I guess I'd say, "When in doubt, cut."  I think most pros follow the same guidelines, but sometimes you actually do need a boost.

Whenever you boost the gain, or the gain in a particular frequency band (with EQ) you have the potential for clipping.  Clipping is "flat topped waves" caused by trying to go above the analog or digital maximum.

For example, you can get analog clipping if you turn up the volume to the point where you're trying to push 110 Watts out of a 100 Watt amplifier.  This can happen even if you only cut frequencies with the equalizer...  Because after you cut the mid-frequencies, you'll turn-up the volume to compensate.  The net effect is that the bass and treble signal levels are boosted.  This a very common problem...  +6dB is double the signal level (or double the voltage), but 4 times the power (watts)! 

You'll get digital clipping if you try to go over the digital maximum.  For example, if you try to go higher than you can "count" with 16-bits.    In your case, the combination of real-time software EQ, your Windows mixer settings, and signal level, might drive the signal into digital clipping.

The "never boost" rule is most important when you're working with CD rips or MP3s which are usually already normalized (digitally maximized)..  and sometimes already clipped!    So, you'll usually get clipping if you try to (digitally) boost any frequencies, especially if you boost the bass.  (Although, since most audio editors use more than 16-bits, you can compensate by re-normalizing after you EQ, and before you re-save.)

Quote
What's the real difference of both things?
Well...  You could get the same results by boosting some frequencies and cutting the overall gain, or by cutting some frequencies and boosting overall gain.

 
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