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Topic: "Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file (Read 2591 times) previous topic - next topic
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"Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file

Which ways are there to "hardcode" equaliser settings contained within a Winamp EQF file into the file? In other words, I want the file to sound like it would with the equaliser on as it is, in the file's current state I would have to send the EQF file with it for the end user to be able to hear it as intended.

I am aware of that one can adjust equaliser settings in audio editing software such as Audacity, but the equalisers have completely different values so it would be a great advantage to be able to just "filter" the file through the EQF.

"Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file

Reply #1
Quote
Which ways are there to "hardcode" equaliser settings contained within a Winamp EQF file into the file? In other words, I want the file to sound like it would with the equaliser on as it is, in the file's current state I would have to send the EQF file with it for the end user to be able to hear it as intended.

If you want the end user to be able to hear it as intended, you really should equalize using a wave editor.

An equalizer is technically used to nullify the effect of the playback room.

If you use an equalizer to boost/supress certain frequency bands, the effect wholly depends on the listener's setup. An EQ setting good for you may sound bad to others.

"Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file

Reply #2
Quote
Which ways are there to "hardcode" equaliser settings contained within a Winamp EQF file into the file? In other words, I want the file to sound like it would with the equaliser on as it is, in the file's current state I would have to send the EQF file with it for the end user to be able to hear it as intended.

If you want the end user to be able to hear it as intended, you really should equalize using a wave editor.

An equalizer is technically used to nullify the effect of the playback room.

If you use an equalizer to boost/supress certain frequency bands, the effect wholly depends on the listener's setup. An EQ setting good for you may sound bad to others.

Ah, if so I suppose it isn't as critical that it's the same values as in the EQF file. Thanks.

 

"Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file

Reply #3
Let me instead ask: Is there any easy way to record what is currently played back? Like you would with two VCRs when copying a cassette in the old days?

"Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file

Reply #4
If you have the original file, why not decode to .wav and apply equalizing?

Or, since you use WinAmp, use the DiskWriter to dump the decoded-and-mangled (i.e. EQ-ed) audio to .wav

"Hardcode" equaliser settings into a sound file

Reply #5
Yes, there is. Such audio source on windows mixer is usually called "stereo mix" or "what u hear".

Why do you want to apply equalization to your files, if I may ask?


Edit: Little to slow, I was replying to fenstersturz of course.
Not really a Signature.

 
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