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Topic: Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope (Read 5457 times) previous topic - next topic
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Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #1
More of this, please! Regards.

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #2
I found the comparison with CED and CD to be very enlightening.

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #3
FWIW, that animated image was made by painstaking stop motion photography.  You aren't actually watching a stylus move through the groove in real time.






Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #6
That looks gruesome.

Upset an audiophile and you wake up to find it on the bed by your side
The most important audio cables are the ones in the brain


Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #8
So the conclusion here is electron microscope fails to reveal unicorns in vinly lp grooves? We have a result.

Apart from that, though, I found it quite interesting, just to see.
The most important audio cables are the ones in the brain

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #9
So the conclusion here is electron microscope fails to reveal unicorns in vinly lp grooves? We have a result.

You didn't notice what the stylus was made from. A microscopic unicorn died to make that. 

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #10
Here's a nice clip showing what it takes to photograph vinyl "playing" under a scanning electron microscope. Also shows VideoDisc and CD-ROM.

http://benkrasnow.blogspot.com/2015/06/ele...tion-video.html



(direct link to the video: YouTube)


Still amazing that we got that weird concoction of technologies to work as well as we did. Oh, well, we had about 90 years to work on it until we gave up on it.

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #11
Still amazing that we got that weird concoction of technologies to work as well as we did. Oh, well, we had about 90 years to work on it until we gave up on it.


Indeed, and I am repeatedly amazed at how good dragging a pointy bit of metal through a wobbly ridge in a mass-produced piece of plastic can actually sound.

The large cover art and physical nature of the whole thing is a big bonus to LPs. To me, streaming is inferior to actually owning the physical recordings, and I still own every CD (and LP) I've ever bought. Even though I listen to music I've ripped to my media server 99% of the time and hardly every put on a CD just to listen to it, I just don't want to give up the actual physical objects. I put on a lot more LPs than CDs these days.

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #12
Still amazing that we got that weird concoction of technologies to work as well as we did. Oh, well, we had about 90 years to work on it until we gave up on it.


Indeed, and I am repeatedly amazed at how good dragging a pointy bit of metal through a wobbly ridge in a mass-produced piece of plastic can actually sound.


I am still amazed at how good a coilgun projectile glued to some plastic cone or fabric dome can sound, given that it wastes kinda like ninety-nine percent of the power you feed it and must do so reasonably evenly for the remaining percent output to be linear wrt. input.
High Voltage socket-nose-avatar

 

Stylus in groove under scanning electron microscope

Reply #13
I don't know, but I suspect if you could closely watch a stylus moving at normal speed in a record groove, rather than a stop-motion animation, you would see it doesn't always maintain perfect contact - especially when the singer sings an "S" sound - and especially with lower quality record players.

OT, but next suggested YouTube video was about a German "tape" machine from the 1950s where the tape used vinyl/record technology read with the stylus, rather than magnetic. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBNTAmLRmUg Never seen one of these before.

Cheers,
David.

 
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