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Topic: Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus? (Read 6649 times) previous topic - next topic
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Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Now that we have a 1.0 and even a 1.1 version of OPUS, and it's a IETF standard, any chance it might get adopted by any of the music stores or streaming services?

Is Opus supposed to achieve transparency at lower bitrates than other codecs?

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #1
Hate to say that but music stores are aiming for wide device compatibility, not efficient codec usage, so i think mp3 and other legacy codecs are not going anywhere in the upcoming years.

Maybe the subscription based YouTube service will allow streaming in Opus since WebM is being extended to support this codec next to Vorbis, but i'm affraid it will be only a transcode of the AAC/MP3 original.

If you like to use Opus right now i think it's the best is to start converting your own lossless music to Opus and upload it to some online storage service which allows HTML audio streaming to browser without conversion. Or host it on your own server, at least that's what I'm planning to do.
WavPack -b4x4hc
Opus --cvbr --bitrate 256 --framesize 5

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #2
Hate to say that but music stores are aiming for wide device compatibility, not efficient codec usage, so i think mp3 and other legacy codecs are not going anywhere in the upcoming years.

Maybe the subscription based YouTube service will allow streaming in Opus since WebM is being extended to support this codec next to Vorbis, but i'm affraid it will be only a transcode of the AAC/MP3 original.

If you like to use Opus right now i think it's the best is to start converting your own lossless music to Opus and upload it to some online storage service which allows HTML audio streaming to browser without conversion. Or host it on your own server, at least that's what I'm planning to do.


Services like Spotify might be interested in Opus.

I have an Ampache server running at home currently feeding me a mix of MP3s, Ogg Vorbis, and the new U2 album in AAC (cause it was free.)  I have ampache set up right now NOT to transcode anything, and my phone plays these formats just fine.  Until Android and other OS makers support Opus natively, I don't know if I could be all Opus all the time.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #3
Until Android and other OS makers support Opus natively, I don't know if I could be all Opus all the time.


Android L supports opus natively

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #4
I don't think adoption will take off as a result, but native support is awesome. If they would add it to the online "play" storage that would be awesome. Right now everything you upload that is not MP3 is transcoded to MP3
--
Eric

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #5
affraid

Afraid

Ampache

Apache

Quote
the new U2 album in AAC (cause it was free.)

It was free because of royalties they have with Apple and it was free for a limited time only on iTunes, what you are doing is illegal like sharing every other commercial album.



Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #8
Ampache

Apache


you might want to check what you're "correcting" before you "correct" it. 

http://ampache.org/


Correct.  Ampache is awesome.  Been running it for about a year now.  It's like my own little music streaming service.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #9
It's not transcoded.  It's matched to a 320K MP3 they have in their store.

I don't think he meant Google Play, Google L (Lollipop 5.0) supports Opus natively: http://developer.android.com/about/versions/lollipop.html

Correct.  Ampache is awesome.  Been running it for about a year now.  It's like my own little music streaming service.

LOL sorry about the correction, I wanted to Google it but I thought it was just a typo  Checking it out right now.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #10
Streaming sites may switch to it eventually, but I don't see distribution in Opus making much sense.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #11
Quote
the new U2 album in AAC (cause it was free.)

It was free because of royalties they have with Apple and it was free for a limited time only on iTunes, what you are doing is illegal like sharing every other commercial album.

How is this illegal?


It's not transcoded.  It's matched to a 320K MP3 they have in their store.

I don't think he meant Google Play, Google L (Lollipop 5.0) supports Opus natively: http://developer.android.com/about/versions/lollipop.html


I think he meant to respond to this comment:
Quote
If they would add it to the online "play" storage that would be awesome. Right now everything you upload that is not MP3 is transcoded to MP3

Which I think is true. I know iTunes Match does matching (duh), but I think Google Play just uploads your stuff.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #12
Quote
the new U2 album in AAC (cause it was free.)

It was free because of royalties they have with Apple and it was free for a limited time only on iTunes, what you are doing is illegal like sharing every other commercial album.

How is this illegal?

You can't share an U2 album just because it was free on iTunes, it was free only on iCloud not everywhere and also it was not royalty free.

I guess it's just my opinion then.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #13
It's not illegal as long as he is the only one who accesses and uses his ampache instance. If he allows others to access it then he would be in violation.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #14
It's not illegal as long as he is the only one who accesses and uses his ampache instance. If he allows others to access it then he would be in violation.

Goddamn it guys, I am retarded sorry, I was 100% thinking he was sharing it with Apache to the world (not Ampache, locally). Stressful day today, please recycle my posts in this thread.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #15
FWIW, The "cause" in "cause it was free" as I understood it referred to that being the reason that he has AAC content at all, not that he was "sharing" cause it was free. As in, if it hadn't been free, he wouldn't have that album and thus no AAC content.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #16
Yes folks.  You got it right.  Have it in my Ampache server streaming to various devices in my house, along with with my and my wife's phone.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #17
I think he meant to respond to this comment:
Quote
If they would add it to the online "play" storage that would be awesome. Right now everything you upload that is not MP3 is transcoded to MP3

Which I think is true. I know iTunes Match does matching (duh), but I think Google Play just uploads your stuff.


From the Google Play list of supported formats, under OGG (.ogg), "Files are converted to the same bitrate (quality) .mp3 files"

https://support.google.com/googleplay/answer/1100462?hl=en
--
Eric

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #18
I think he meant to respond to this comment:
Quote
If they would add it to the online "play" storage that would be awesome. Right now everything you upload that is not MP3 is transcoded to MP3

Which I think is true. I know iTunes Match does matching (duh), but I think Google Play just uploads your stuff.


From the Google Play list of supported formats, under OGG (.ogg), "Files are converted to the same bitrate (quality) .mp3 files"

https://support.google.com/googleplay/answer/1100462?hl=en


According to this article, Google matches.  I have my songs in Play Music as a backup.  I'd hate to think they trascoded all my VBR oggs to 320K MP3 files.

http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2014/03/g...usic-match.html

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #19
I think he meant to respond to this comment:
Quote
If they would add it to the online "play" storage that would be awesome. Right now everything you upload that is not MP3 is transcoded to MP3

Which I think is true. I know iTunes Match does matching (duh), but I think Google Play just uploads your stuff.


From the Google Play list of supported formats, under OGG (.ogg), "Files are converted to the same bitrate (quality) .mp3 files"

https://support.google.com/googleplay/answer/1100462?hl=en


According to this article, Google matches.  I have my songs in Play Music as a backup.  I'd hate to think they trascoded all my VBR oggs to 320K MP3 files.

http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2014/03/g...usic-match.html


According to my preliminary putzing around, Google does in fact match, unless the track is marked as an "Album Only" purchase.  In that case, it seems to upload and convert.  When I went into Black Star Elephant by Nico & Vinz, which I had ripped to 256K ogg, all the tracks that were available a singles for purchase were downloaded as 320K MP3s.  All the tracks marked as "Album Only" came down as 256K MP3 files, I assume because of the ogg conversion.

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #20
One Korean music store, Bugs, had used vorbis (probably 96k) for its streaming service.
Now it offers three options in its android and iphone applications: 48k HE-AAC (default), 192k and 320k MP3.

IMO, 48k Opus seems to have no clear advantages over 48k HE-AAC, except royalty-free.
It might be possible for Bugs to start Opus streaming, though, but not in the near future.
(re-encoding all tracks into opus will be a time-consuming work)


 

Will any of the major music stores switch to Opus?

Reply #22
IMO, 48k Opus seems to have no clear advantages over 48k HE-AAC, except royalty-free.


Other than sounding better, you mean?


Probably yes, but in my own test, opus and he-aac showed similar quality at 48k. I think Bugs won't use its resources to achieve such a marginal quality improvement.

BTW, is there any listening test to compare opus and he-aac at lower bitrates than 64k? I only have seen the comparison of opus and aac-lc.


Edit:
Sadly, most korean people are not interested in advanced audio formats.
Many people still transencode ogg and aac files just because these files cannot be played in their devices.
Because of this, Korean music stores think MP3 streaming at 192k or above is enough.

Recently, Korean music stores want to make more profits by advertising high-definition audio (lossless > 48kHz/24bit),
because the prices for a single track download and unlimited streaming (lossy formats) are extremely lower than those in other countries.

 
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