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1
Yes, for example with foo_upnp plugin.
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As far as input sensitivity goes, for the XLS series it is 0.775 or 1.4 volts RMS for full output. Connecting an unbalanced input cuts that in half, so the 0.775 volt setting is the one to use, and it gives you an actual 1.5 volt sensitivity which is pretty common for consumer amps. IOW, no problems expected on this front.

https://www.crownaudio.com/en/products/xls-1002
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Audio Hardware / Re: Crown amplifiers for home audio?
Last post by Hubert Watson -
I am considering the crown amplifiers: XLS 1502 DriveCore 2 series.
https://www.crownaudio.com/en-US/products/xls-1502

Has anyone used these for home audio use? Would like to hear experiences. From what I have read on forums they are good and sound neutral.

A few things I have questions about:

1. Fans. Wondering if anyone has used these and if this is a problem, if so can it be fixed?

2. Preamplifier:
What would be good recommendations? The sensitivity can be set to 1.4Vrms or .775Vrms (this will lower the S/N by 6 db). Do I need to consider impedance when  matching the preamp and power amp? features? Hoping to find something economical: there is a used shop I can check out, and online.

3. Power output: How Crown measures watts
"The test is simple: the amplifier is set up with the level controls turned to the maximum setting, and then a connected sine wave source is increased until  the specified total harmonic distortion is reached"

I'm not sure how this compares to other amps. What would be the equivalent measuring 20-20khz?

I thought this would be a more economical way to get a amp than a HiFi shop. It can do well into 4 ohms.

Joe

The Crown XLS Series 2 amps are an excellent choice for home hifi use. I own the XLS 2502, it's quiet, stays cool and is green at the wall. There has been absolutely no fan noise in the background, ever. In fact, I don't think the fan has come on even once. You won't go wrong with one of these amps.
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Audio Hardware / Re: Crown amplifiers for home audio?
Last post by DVDdoug -
Quote
3. Power output: How Crown measures watts
"The test is simple: the amplifier is set up with the level controls turned to the maximum setting, and then a connected sine wave source is increased until   the specified total harmonic distortion is reached"
I'd trust Crown's specs more than most manufacturers.  ;)

And, I'm pretty sure you'll have plenty of power to rattle your walls and damage your hearing... and blow your speakers :D (unless you also have pro/PA speakers).

Quote
2. Preamplifier:
What would be good recommendations? The sensitivity can be set to 1.4Vrms or .775Vrms (this will lower the S/N by 6 db). Do I need to consider impedance when  matching the preamp and power amp? features? Hoping to find something economical: there is a used shop I can check out, and online.
I don't have a preamp recommendation.   It depends on what features & inputs you want.

Hopefully you can find the output-voltage specs.    Consumer line level might not drive the amp to full power, but consumer equipment isn't necessarily line level anyway so the outputs might be a little hotter.

Impedance is NOT an issue.    You don't want to "match" the impedance.   You want the preamp's source impedance to be much lower than the power amp's input impedance.  The preamp/line output has relatively low source impedance (typically  1K  Ohm or less) and the power amp has relative high impedance (typically 10K - 100K).

...Preamps (and separates in general) are sort-of "outdated" in the age of digital inputs, home theater, and surround sound.    And unless you are using a turntable you don't actually need "preamplification", you just need a switching/control center.
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Audio Hardware / Re: Crown amplifiers for home audio?
Last post by Fairy -
Why would you use a PA amplifier for hi-fi home use? These amps are not designed with home hifi use in mind. They are solid build amplifiers, but could lack the 'finesse' you would expect from a good hi-fi amplifier.
If you have one laying around you could try it out, but why BUY one new for this purpose?

I have used a PA amplifier myself when I was a teen and I remember is sounded very dull and lifeless, but was able to drive big speakers very loud, just what they are made for.

There are plenty other options that offer a lot more features, possibly better sound at a better pricepoint.

Depending on the speakers you want to drive and the size of the room, take a look at for example the NAD range, the C338, 368 or 388.
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General - (fb2k) / Re: My Foobar screenshot
Last post by j7n -
A decade ago Flat Design with 2 bits of dynamic range wasn't fashionable yet, except when output to a laser printer. Buttons were big and natural.
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General - (fb2k) / Re: My Foobar screenshot
Last post by Sergey77 -
I use Columns UI
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Audio Hardware / Re: Electrostatic speaker myths
Last post by Arnold B. Krueger -
"Why the Quad ESL is able to do so is simply because of the moving part of the Quad ESL, the electrostatic diaphragm, which is a thin layer of stretched Mylar, ten times thinner than a human hair and so light that it approaches the mass of air to which it is coupled." - http://quad-hifi.co.uk/product.php?cid=5

From a scientific veiewpoint this is meaningless, until the repeal of the Law of Newton we often refer to as F = MA.  This means that you can manage high mass quite effectively if you can come up with a correspondingly high force.

Of all common formats of loudspeaker, electrostats have a track record for having problematically limited sources of force.

The simple fact is that obtainin lots of dynamic range is no problem for conventional designs. but are mission impossible for 'stat's.  If diaphragm acceleration were the most important thing, compression drivers would rule.
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Vinyl / Re: 33 vs 45rpm -- Technical Differences
Last post by Arnold B. Krueger -
My understanding is that differences in their sound quality can be attributed to the following:

  • 45s are typically shorter. This means that music needs to be less dynamically-compressed to avoid skipping as the grooves can be cut more deeply. This could have an effect on bass frequencies.
  • 45s are often mastered 'hot' for use as singles or for clubs. Listeners typically have a bias towards louder music, and thus dynamic-range compression can be interpreted as higher quality.

Am I missing something here? I have seen claims that 45s have a greater 'resolution' or lower SNR, but I don't immediately see how these points follow from groove density or playback speed of the recording -- surely this is related to the source and mastering of the music?

Let's say, for example, that I produce a short 2 KHz sine wave with consistent peak amplitude. I press it to 45 and 33rpm 12" records with no additional mastering. When played back, should the sound quality of these records differ -- and if so, how/why?

To me cleaner has two dimensions - nonlinear distortion and noise.  I tend to characterize frequency response variations as *tone*, and so it is a different topic.

Distortion in LP playback has a geometric origin. Making a cutter and a player stylus follow the identical same path is not trivial, and becomes less trivial the shorter the recorded frequencies' wavelength (higher frequenceis). That all said, 2 KHz is generally too low for wavelength effects to dominate.

Noise in LP playback has several sources, including tics and pops, mechanical vibration, electronic noise, and physical imperfections in the playback media. All but electronic noise appear to be sensitive to speed of rotation and groove radius.  Faster rotation, more noise and more noise spectra at higher (typically more audible) frequencies.  Working against that is the fact that higher effective linear speed of groove tracking makes the same groove produce more electrical signal with velocity-sensitive pickups.

IME most single play 45's are hastily made with quick delivery in high volumes being of the essence. LP's are very sensitive to care during production and sacrifice that, and SQ quickly follows it. The performance of EP and LP 45s could follow their technical advantages more closely.



10
i like to line up the vertical divider at the right side of the volume slider with one of my splitters in the main window. in 1.3.17 and previous versions i could unlock the toolbar, line up the volume divider, then lock it again and everything would magically stay in place. in 1.4b3 when i lined up the divider and locked the toolbar, everything shifted to the left. the "order" or the "output" selector seems to be growing, depending on what i have at the far right.