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Topic: Checking FLAC files in Linux (Read 4336 times) previous topic - next topic
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Checking FLAC files in Linux

After years of lurking and finding that this board can solve all my music problems - for which I am eternally grateful to this community - I am stuck. I need help to test all my flac files.

All my Cds were ripped to FLAC (using EAC or Plextools on windows) and the files saved to 2 hard drives. The files are stored without subdirectories, just in directories "Lossless" and "Lossless2".

Having moved the files over to a linux box now, I would like to check for errors. I should emphasise that I have had no specific problems - this is for peace of mind. I am a total novice with linux, but after searching here I used the following:

flac -t -s *.flac "%i" 2>> log.txt

This worked fine on a small directory with about 6 test files. But when I try to use this on the "real" directories the thing pauses then returns to the prompt without any file testing. Any help with this would be really appreciated.

Checking FLAC files in Linux

Reply #1
flac -t -s *.flac "%i" 2>> log.txt

This worked fine on a small directory with about 6 test files. But when I try to use this on the "real" directories the thing pauses then returns to the prompt without any file testing. Any help with this would be really appreciated.


If there are Really Many flac files in that directory the globbing with the *.flac wildcard will expand to a command line too long.

find -name "*.flac" -print0 | xargs -0 flac -t -s

would sidestep that issue, because xargs feeds only as many files into the command as your shell can handle. I would check without redirecting output first.

And, what is "%i" for?

Checking FLAC files in Linux

Reply #2
Thanks for the fast response  . I will try that tonight.

As for the "%i" thing - I have no idea, it was copied from some other post. Being a complete newbie with linux I just followed the recommendation.

 

Checking FLAC files in Linux

Reply #3
Many thanks towolf that worked perfectly.