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Topic: Ripping in 24 bit (Read 3712 times) previous topic - next topic
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Ripping in 24 bit

I'm back with another silly question. Now I've got the Eac / Flac up and running. I'm preparing for my new soundcard next week the Maudio 24/96.
What I cant work out is the only time I see a mention in my software of 24 bit is in foobar.
I see no mention in Eac for ripping and again only 16 bit in dBpower for decoding back to wav.
How can you get 24 bit playback in foobar if you only rip in 16.
Excuse me if you guys think I'm a wally, can you explain what I'm missing (no, not a brain)

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #1
Under the Playback preferences select "Show all options" for the output data format and select "24bit fixed-point padded to 32bit".  While upsampling to 24-bit technically means that it's no longer lossless, it will improve the SNR to have the DACs operating at 24-bits instead of 16-bit which should result in higher quality.

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #2
That's what I'm saying, the option is in the playback ie. foobar. My question is can you achieve this if you have only ripped at 16 bit, if you see what I mean?

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #3
The CD itself is limited to 16 bits. It doesn't bring anything to convert from 16 to 24 bits during playback.
MrRadar, are you sure about the S/N ratio ? Are there RMAA measurments about this ? It seems logical that 24 bits provide a better S/N ratio than 16 bits, but what about 16-to-24 bits playback in a 24 bits DAC versus 16 bits playback in a 24 bits DAC ?

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #4
is there a loss in quality when playing 16bit audio files via spdif out on a 24bit audio card ? (when using 24bit padded to 32 like i do on my revo 7.1 with foobar)

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #5
Quote
is there a loss in quality when playing 16bit audio files via spdif out on a 24bit audio card ? (when using 24bit padded to 32 like i do on my revo 7.1 with foobar)
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


This is a very difficult question, whose answer involve the Operating System, the Software player, and the card drivers.
Discussion : [a href="http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=11725]http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=11725[/url]

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #6
hi pio2001,
i'm using the revo 7.1 with kernelstreaming (foobar) on win2k3server and only with spdif output.

i have a friend who has a rme hdsp 9652 soundcard which has digital inputs.

is there a guide how to find out if your soundcard puts out bit-identical data?

something like
file => CRC => output revo => input rme => compare CRC

edit: sorry for the typos, i drank too much wine 

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #7
Quote
While upsampling to 24-bit technically means that it's no longer lossless, it will improve the SNR to have the DACs operating at 24-bits instead of 16-bit which should result in higher quality.


Except playing a 16 bit file through a 24 bit sound card will use the upper bits (try playing an 8 bit file, the volume will be the same as 24 bit) - ie identical as playing a 16 bit file converted to 24 bit.

 

Ripping in 24 bit

Reply #8
Quote
file => CRC => output revo => input rme => compare CRC
[a href="index.php?act=findpost&pid=233496"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


No need to get the CRCs, use EAC's compare wav tool.
You need to set the digital clock of the recording card to its digital input, in "slave", not "master".
You should test it at different sample rates, like 44.1 kHz, 48 kHz, and 42845 Hz, because it can work at 48 kHz and not at 44.1 kHz, for example. EAC's compare wavs can only compare 44100 Hz wavs. However, you just have to set them to 44100 Hz without resampling, with a wave editor, so that EAC believes they are 44100 Hz.
Other methods : substract the recording from the original, and ask for statistics on the resulting file. The highest sample should be 0. You can also use the MS-DOS FC command line with the /B commutator, but if there are metadata at the end of the files, they will appear different even if they have the same audio. A way to avoid different metadata is to open the original file and save it under another name with the same software that you will use for the recording.

 
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