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Topic: DVDr vs. commerical DVD (Read 3755 times) previous topic - next topic
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DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Can someone point me to a good source(s) of information surrounding copying DVD movies to DVDr media?  I'm aware of the divx rips and SVCD, but I want to know if lossless copying can be preformed on a PC w/ the proper hardware.

Here are a few topics (naive questions) I would like to learn about:

Lossless duplication of movie DVDs
-Can one simply copy a DVD in a drive-to-drive fashion like an audio CD?
-If not, how?  Ripping to mpeg-2 first, then burning to DVDr?

Formatting of movie DVDs
-How many gigs fit on a "movie" DVD (e.g. something one rents from blockbuster)?
-Is it protected (formatted) in a way that will prevent duplication like this new audio protection I have been reading about?

Assuming this is possible, how does one deal w/ the menus and links to extra features, scenes, etc.?  Are these simply ripped as their own respective mpeg-2s?  I need info

Thanks all, this place rocks

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #1
AFAIK, DVD movies are mostly, if not solely, on dual-layer DVDs. So there's no lossless 1:1 copy possible, since dual-layer DVD-Rs are not available.

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #2
yes most dvd's are dual layer. but any dual SIDED dvds are able to be copied. but most are dual layers anyways.

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #3
Not only that, but I have read that DVD-Video also contains the CSS encryption keys in a place on the disc that cannot be burned onto consumer DVD-R's (maybe before the lead-in?). Try www.vcdhelp.com and search for "movies under 4.7GB" in the forums. I recall that they had a huge list of movies that could (theoretically) be copied w/o re-encoding the VOBs to a lower bitrate. That's about as close as you can get to a 1:1 copy at this point, I'm afraid.

PS-- most movies I've seen are DVD-9's (single sided, dual-layered). Some short movies are 4.7GB or less and will fit onto a sinlge-sided DVD-R if you rip the VOB's and burn them with an authoring program such as My DVD or Ulead DVD Studio, etc..

(Edit: Added DVD-R capacities)

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #4
You may try:
http://www.doom9.org
go to Guides->DVD and miniDVD->Copying a DVD-9 to 2 DVD-R's
(cause I don't think DOOM9 likes linking to any content beside main page directly...)

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #5
what i did with dvd-4.7 was i ripped using smartripper which took css out and burned the vob's and nfo files back with nero. even menus worked

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #6
Heh. Is this discussion even legal?
The sky is blue.

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #7
Quote
Originally posted by mpcfiend
Heh. Is this discussion even legal?


Of couse. Everybody here is using it only to backup their precious movies, isn't it, people?

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #8
Quote
Originally posted by mpcfiend
Heh. Is this discussion even legal?

Section 1202(2)(A) of the DMCA:
Quote
No person shall manufacture, import, offer to the public, provide, or otherwise traffic in any technology, product, service, device, component, or part thereof, that is primarily designed or produced for the purpose of circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title...

Nope

...but then again, jaywalking is illegal too

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #9
I think encoding a DVD-9 to lower bitrate MPEG-2 to fit on a DVD-r would result in seriously degraded image quality...

Perhaps encoding to a MPEG-4 format would be better, but I guess you can't use it on standalone players...yet.

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #10
Quote
No person shall manufacture, import, offer to the public, provide, or otherwise traffic in any technology, product, service, device, component, or part thereof, that is primarily designed or produced for the purpose of circumventing a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title...


This must be from USCA (United States of Crazy Americans).
In my nice little country ist is perfect legal to make personally backups of DVD and CD's.
as long as you have a "license" (bought the original product

Actually there is a rumor going on that it is legal to copy CD's you have borrow at the library...
Sven Bent - Denmark

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #11
Quote
Originally posted by sven_Bent
 

This must be from USCA (United States of Crazy Americans).
In my nice little country ist is perfect legal to make personally backups of DVD and CD's.
as long as you have a "license" (bought the original product
Same here...  Things like that make you wonder if America really is a democratic nation... 

DVDr vs. commerical DVD

Reply #12
Quote
Same here...  Things like that make you wonder if America really is a democratic nation... 

it is ! and The People (which consists of people, lobbies, etc. etc.) make up such laws...  but I think it is a project of legislations, though (Sven's quote) ?

 
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