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Topic: Subwoofer in a system: Data showing benefit of also utilising a high pass filter (Read 3613 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: Subwoofer in a system: Data showing benefit of also utilising a high pass filter

Reply #1
Was that a question?    A crossover is standard.    Every Home theater receiver has a crossover for the subwoofer output. 

The standard set-up uses "bass management" to re-direct ALL low-frequency information to the subwoofer so you can use "small" main/surround speakers.   If you turn-off bass management, the full frequency range goes to the 5 or 7 surround speakers unfiltered, and ONLY the LFE (low frequency effects) go to the subwoofer.

If you add a subwoofer to a regular-old stereo system, there often isn't a filter/crossover for the original stereo speakers but that's not a "proper" setup.

 

Re: Subwoofer in a system: Data showing benefit of also utilising a high pass filter

Reply #2
Yes there often is not a crossover,and so the owners of such things do not get the be benefit of mid range clarity that a sub can provide. The reduction in IMD is visible in the charts in the link. That is for a 3 way speaker plus a sub , so it seems reasonable to expect that  the data for the improvement for a two way speaker would be  greater still.

 
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