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Topic: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t) (Read 1642 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #1
I had a Columbia Masterworks disc that had 1 side slightly off center. I marked an 'X' near the hole to indicate where to 'center' the disc for least wow. I do not miss analog recordings, neither audo or video.

It's not surprising to see an expensive 'fix' for an inherent problem in analog recording/playback.

If I understand correctly, what is recorded on tape or disc is the first derivative of the original signal
meaning signal peak is the VELOCITY of the stylus or the rate of change in the head. Playback would
be the second derivative. No such issue in digital,


Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #2
Seems being a vinyl Lover could turn into a very very expensive hobby.

I wonder do will have a thread on what the most people here paid for audio equipment
& what it was?

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #3
There once was a turntable that could do this on its own:

https://youtu.be/G0UKRLYgEk8

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #4
You can RENT Capatan software to fix wow & flutter in digitized recordings for "only" $200.    I'm not sure if it works in real-time as you are playing a record.

I never owned a record that was audibly-off center (I maxed-out at less than 100 records before CDs came out).    I would have simply exchanged it.

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #5
There once was a turntable that could do this on its own:

https://youtu.be/G0UKRLYgEk8
Nice. It also seems like this one is superior because the center hole could literally be 1cm to the side and you could still correct for it. With the other solution, you are dependant on the center hole tolerances ALLOWING you to push the record to its true center.

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #6
Nakamichi did stuff. I didn't even know they used the "Dragon" name on a turntable, the tape deck of course has a mythical status still - now also for the repair costs.

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #7
:D You have to be eccentric to be a vinyl lover!  :D

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #8
Seems being a vinyl Lover could turn into a very very expensive hobby.
A "fun" never-ending quest for "perfection" that you never really achieve while avoiding the perfect solution that actually exists.
You can't have all these entertaining rube-goldberg contraptions with digital audio.

Like this silly anti-gravity turntable which YT put in the recommendations column for the other video for me to see: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Mag-Lev+ML1
Not sure what the advantages of such a design are supposed to be, but it seems to me like it shouldn't be very good at all.

 

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #9
Vertical vinyl record player from 1983.
I don't think it's level.   :)

https://youtu.be/vjYPcWMPdk8
A dinosaur Victrola, listening to Buck Owens.

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #10
While I was aware that record eccentricity and warps introduce much higher values of wow and flutter than turntables themselves, I wonder if radial tonearms cause any timing error, as well, since unlike tangential/linear tracking tonearms they swing across the record in an arc. I know there is already a slight shift between left and right channels because of that, but does it not cause also a slight timing issue in general, a sound that will play a few milliseconds earlier or later compared to tangential tonearms. If we imagine a turntable with zero speed variation, a perfect test record with test tone (a 1000Hz sinewave, for example) and zero eccentricity during playback with a radial tonearm, would the frequency not gradually change, aside the above-mentioned L/R issue? (It is just an example, I know it would be unachievable in the real world.)

Re: Eccentricity detection stabilizer (More LP Bulls--t)

Reply #11
I’m not understanding exactly how it’s “bullshit”

It’s expensive - yes
Does it work? Seemingly, though I haven’t tested it myself
Is it worth it to you? Not for me to decide


The device is not free from criticism as it does require widening of the center hole with a reamer so there is enough play to re-center the disc around the spindle. Not something I’d want to do to my records. Though this could be a very invaluable tool for archivists. It’s better to get these things right than call it “good enough” and transfer with timing errors baked in, however small.

DS Audio does a lot to advance state of the art LP playback. They should be commended for regularly trying to bring things into the 21st century instead of attempts to just match/replicate what was possible 50 years ago.