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Hydrogenaudio Forum => Polls => Topic started by: skamp on 14 January, 2013, 09:42:57 AM

Poll
Question: What devices do you use on a regular basis for listening to music?
Option 1: Speakers votes: 179
Option 2: Headphones votes: 160
Option 3: In Ear Monitors (IEM) votes: 69
Option 4: Earbuds votes: 29
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 14 January, 2013, 09:42:57 AM
What kind of speakers do you use for listening to music? Speakers, headphones, IEMs, earbuds… Multiple choices are allowed to reflect different use cases.

Notes:
  • a distinction is made between stationary use (e.g. at home or at work) and on the go (when walking / riding / driving, commuting…)
  • circumaural headphones surround the ears
  • supra-aural headphones (on-ear) are usually smaller (but not necessarily always) and sit on top of the ears
  • custom mold IEMs require a visit to an orthophonist who makes silicon molds out of one's ears, which are to be shipped to the custom IEM manufacturer
  • earbuds sit on the outer ears and are not inserted into the ear canals like IEMs
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: dhromed on 14 January, 2013, 10:12:32 AM
I'm not sure I agree with your specific distinction between supra-aural and circumaural.

The Philips SHP2700 (https://www.google.nl/search?hl=nl&safe=off&q=Philips+SHP2700&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1357700187,d.d2k&biw=1200&bih=1453&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=hh70UL6FGMec0AWhzIFg) squashes against my ears, as does the harsh Hercules M1001 (https://www.google.nl/search?hl=nl&safe=off&q=Philips+SHP2700&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1357700187,d.d2k&biw=1200&bih=1453&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=hh70UL6FGMec0AWhzIFg#um=1&hl=nl&safe=off&tbo=d&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=Hercules+M1001&oq=Hercules+M1001&gs_l=img.3..0i24.134613.142756.0.143227.14.10.0.4.4.0.241.1138.6j3j1.10.0...0.0...1c.1.XS4YoAIezns&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1357700187,d.d2k&fp=3eaf587c2dd2d0ad&biw=1200&bih=1453).

The Senheiser HD555 (https://www.google.nl/search?hl=nl&safe=off&q=Philips+SHP2700&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1357700187,d.d2k&biw=1200&bih=1453&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=hh70UL6FGMec0AWhzIFg#um=1&hl=nl&safe=off&tbo=d&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=sennheiser+HD555&oq=sennheiser+HD555&gs_l=img.3..0j0i24l2j0i10i24j0i24l2j0i10i24j0i24j0i10i24j0i24.89513.94992.2.95223.12.11.1.0.0.0.62.518.11.11.0...0.0...1c.1.Z3QK1rns6Hs&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1357700187,d.d2k&fp=3eaf587c2dd2d0ad&biw=1200&bih=1453), by contrast, truly envelops my ears, and as such is the only one out of these three that I would rightfully call circumaural, even though it's the same size class.

As a side effect, the Philips and especially the Hercules become uncomfortable to me after an hour, while the Sennheiser is almost unnoticable. This is also related to my glasses, obviously.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 14 January, 2013, 10:17:59 AM
The Senheiser HD555, by contrast, truly envelops my ears, and as such is the only one out of these three that I would rightfully call circumaural, even though it's the same size class.


I stand by my distinction, which makes a real difference in terms of comfort (IMO), and I agree with your own classification. I'm going to amend the OP about the size, though.
Personally, I can't stand any on-ear headphones, no matter how good they sound: my ears inevitably get sore after a short while.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 14 January, 2013, 11:00:02 AM
About IEMs: I was never able to get a decent fit with any of the (cheapish) IEMs I bought, that came with the usual spherical silicon tips (http://www.audeoworld.com/img/prod_acc_silicone_l_anthracite.png). I've recently bought Shure SE425 (http://www.shure.eu/products/earphones/se425) IEMs though, which came with two kinds of foam tips (http://static.trustedreviews.com/94/9e689d/724f/15323-img8964s.jpg) (black and yellow) in various sizes (small / medium / large), as well as a pair of triple-flange tips (http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31VR9KKXR5L._SL250_.jpg), of which I trimmed the third flange for comfort. It is the first time that I manage to get a good fit and a good seal, and it restored my faith in IEMs.

I can recommend the Shure SE425s, they're comfortable, well fit and sound very good; they're expensive though, and I feel like cheaper IEMs could still sound very decent, and be much more comfortable / usable, if only they came with better fitting (albeit inexpensive) tips.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: DonP on 14 January, 2013, 11:08:39 AM
One common type of portable head phone I'm not sure how to categorize.  The transducer unit is essentially an ear bud, but they have a head band (so don't fall out as easily)  http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Lightweight-MDR.../dp/B00005N6KG/ (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Lightweight-MDR-W08L-In-The-Ear-Headphones/dp/B00005N6KG/)
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: DonP on 14 January, 2013, 11:12:30 AM
So far looks like a pretty low percentage use car speakers.  I wonder if that reflects urbanites and others who don't drive much, or more not using car stereos when they do drive.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 14 January, 2013, 11:26:58 AM
I mostly use headphones IEMs, as much of my relatively small amount of listening (sadface) nowadays is done whilst on the move or at the gym.

When inside, I use studio monitor speakers, which I assume would be filed under “Desktop speakers”: I use 2× M-Audio BX5a, to which I connect either my iPod (another sadface), computer, or POD X3 Live (guitar/studio multi-effects pedal and USB audio interface) depending on context.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Hotsoup on 14 January, 2013, 11:27:05 AM
So far looks like a pretty low percentage use car speakers.  I wonder if that reflects urbanites and others who don't drive much, or more not using car stereos when they do drive.
Maybe most other commuters listen to talk radio or NPR. I spend at least 50 minutes every weekday commuting in my car. Realistically, it's where I do the bulk of my (active) music listening while my work station speakers are mainly for background noise.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 14 January, 2013, 11:34:17 AM
One common type of portable head phone I'm not sure how to categorize.  The transducer unit is essentially an ear bud, but they have a head band (so don't fall out as easily)


When inside, I use studio monitor speakers, which I assume would be filed under “Desktop speakers”


Yes to both, I would classify them as earbuds and desktop speakers, respectively.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Nessuno on 14 January, 2013, 12:34:15 PM
I voted for IEMs and Hi-Fi speakers even if actually the longest span of time I spend listening I use earbuds: I use them at work, about six hours a day, but that's not real listening for the sake of music, is kind of background, at very low volume and frequently interrupted by phone calls, colleagues coming in to talk etc... so little care to SQ and more to comfort, lightness, fast positioning.
IEMs and speakers are what I use once back home. Nowadays more IEMs than speakers, but in a few months I'll be moving and I'll finally have a room to devote mainly to music , so I forecast speakers will be (again) my main source.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: almostmitch on 14 January, 2013, 12:50:50 PM
So far looks like a pretty low percentage use car speakers.  I wonder if that reflects urbanites and others who don't drive much, or more not using car stereos when they do drive.

I do a fair amount of listening while in my car, roughly an hour a day. I have a full aftermarket setup I'd classify as mid-grade. Definitely all respectable gear, but not what I would call true hi-fi.
I have two, 3-way Kenwood door speakers with 6.5 inch woofers. Two 4-way Kenwood rear speakers (6x9). Also, two Kenwood 12 inch woofers in the trunk powered by a mono block 1200 watt amp.
A fairly cheap Sony head unit ties it all together.
It's a loud, clean sounding system. I have sound deadening material covering the whole inside of the trunk and in other important areas. It's good but I'm working on setting up a home system for flac files and vinyl.
I have a Yamaha Reciever (https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&q=yamaha%20r-s300bl&ion=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_cp.r_qf.&bvm=bv.1357700187,d.aWM&biw=1680&bih=959&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=iw&ei=rkT0UI2RFcWwqAGuyIFI) but I don't have the cash for a set of good speakers yet.

I had my eye on these (http://www.amazon.com/Polk-Audio-TSi200-Bookshelf-Speakers/dp/B0018QRO9A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358185739&sr=8-1&keywords=polk+audio+bookshelf+speakers) though. Anyone have thoughts on these speakers? yay, nay?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 14 January, 2013, 12:55:13 PM
Portable headphones (both circumaural and supra-aural, of limited size and bulk) are all the rage in Paris (and have been for a while now). They're mostly a fashion statement (and nope, they're not all Beats!). I reckon that most of the headphones I've seen in the streets are sub-100 euros, however.

Apple iBuds are quite popular as well.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: yourlord on 14 January, 2013, 01:52:48 PM
I use virtually every type of speaker on the list at various times, so I stuck the the most often used items..

My living room stereo is driven by a Pioneer VSX-1122-K receiver which drives 2 KLH 3 way floor speakers, each with a 12" woofer, 5" mid, and tweeter.
Media is fed to that unit over the network since the Pioneer is network ready and can play FLAC and Ogg Vorbis natively. I also feed audio to it via HDMI from XBMC running on a Raspberry Pi.

My other standard speakers are on my main computer. I connect from the computer via S/PDIF to a Yamaha receiver (model escapes me atm) which drives 2 Sony 3 way "bookshelf" speakers, each with a 8" woofer, 4" mid, and tweeter. (those little Sony speakers THUMP)

I listen to a mix of talk radio and mp3's in my truck so the car speakers come into play there.

When I don't want to annoy my family I listen on Sennheiser HD-202 and HD-280 headphones. The HD-202 are supposedly supra-aural but they enclose my ears so I counted them as circumaural. The HD-280's are truely circumaural. The choice of which usually comes down to which pair is in reach at the time.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: thesoundista on 14 January, 2013, 02:15:37 PM
I use the following:

Sennheiser CX 300-II for everyday listening.

KRK Rokit 5's for monitoring in the studio.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: dhromed on 14 January, 2013, 02:27:44 PM
I stand by my distinction, which makes a real difference in terms of comfort (IMO), and I agree with your own classification. I'm going to amend the OP about the size, though.


Thanks, that's what I was talking about. I initially thought that by on-ear you exclusively meant light-weight class phones like these (http://www.stuffgeekswant.com/2008/11/bose-on-ear-headphones-on-top-of-the-market/) and these (http://www.zavvi.com/electronics/earphones-headphones/pivot-on-ear-headphones-grey/-pink/10634600.html), hence my objection.

Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Rescator on 14 January, 2013, 02:56:56 PM
Just an addendum to my circumaural headphone vote, I also use Dolby Headphone (via my Xonar DG's drivers) so it kinda/not really sounds like speakers nor headphones. (hard to describe really)
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: mzil on 14 January, 2013, 04:12:39 PM
I don't see a category "Galactic Princess (http://www.ubergizmo.com/2011/12/galactic-princess-headphone-covers/)"
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Engelsstaub on 14 January, 2013, 05:50:22 PM
...I had my eye on these (http://www.amazon.com/Polk-Audio-TSi200-Bookshelf-Speakers/dp/B0018QRO9A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1358185739&sr=8-1&keywords=polk+audio+bookshelf+speakers) though. Anyone have thoughts on these speakers? yay, nay?


Good entry-level speakers that perform beyond the price, IMO. I have them in my bedroom, which is smallish, and they sound great as long as the source doesn't suck. Positioning/and your environment, as always, is a consideration.

...as for headphones I have a set of Sennheiser HD 595s that I mainly use for critical listening and audio-editing. I have a set of Bowers & Wilkins P5s that I use when I'm listening to my iPod Touch...doing laundry or whatever.

Car speakers are nothing to brag about but get the job done well enough.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Mach-X on 14 January, 2013, 09:37:59 PM
Sennheiser cx300 series II iems. Huge improvement over series i. Durable, capable of prodigious bottom end if eqd. Dont break the bank.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Engelsstaub on 14 January, 2013, 11:22:12 PM
...Nay. That MTM arrangement cures problems that are hardly problems at all, and creates new ones, especially if you don't place the tweeter's at exact ear height [so no standing up while listening allowed] http://www.birotechnology.com/articles/VSTWLA.html (http://www.birotechnology.com/articles/VSTWLA.html) [read the conclusion]
...


Ideally one should listen to speakers in order to base their conclusions on how they sound. As this is not always possible, I guess I would think the next best thing is to get the advice of someone who owns the speakers and can hear them.

...but that's just me. I guess reading some broadly general technical stuff could have its value too. Whatever.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: probedb on 15 January, 2013, 02:54:34 AM
I've used Westone IEMs for maybe 10 years now. Usually with foam tips, lately Comply. You can tell when the seal goes or the foam starts to loosen as well. I did once get some custom tips but they make them from solid vinyl which while usually comfortable, means that any change to your ear shape, i.e. caused by regular use of earplugs makes it really difficult to get them to seal. So I went back to Comply tips

At home I use some 20 year old KEF speakers, never for critical listening (what is that anyway?) as the road I live on is too noisy for that usually.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: JJZolx on 15 January, 2013, 04:52:37 AM
never for critical listening (what is that anyway?)


I would say it's when you're doing nothing but listening to music. Not playing music while you're having a party, or listening while you're eating dinner or listening while you're cleaning the bathroom. All of which I'd call background music. I'd also venture that few people today do anything other than listen to background music.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: probedb on 15 January, 2013, 06:59:26 AM
I would say it's when you're doing nothing but listening to music. Not playing music while you're having a party, or listening while you're eating dinner or listening while you're cleaning the bathroom. All of which I'd call background music. I'd also venture that few people today do anything other than listen to background music.


That's what I'd figured. I used to do it when I lived somewhere quieter so it's really just background music these days. I listen more critically on my way to work than at home now!
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: DonP on 15 January, 2013, 07:36:51 AM
Nay. That MTM arrangement cures problems that are hardly problems at all, and creates new ones, especially if you don't place the tweeter's at exact ear height [so no standing up while listening allowed] http://www.birotechnology.com/articles/VSTWLA.html (http://www.birotechnology.com/articles/VSTWLA.html) [read the conclusion]


The author starts with the assumption that the only motivation for an MTM configuration is to eliminate tilt in the vertical pattern, then puts up graphs showing dips caused by destructive interference as the unwanted side effects.  If done right, those dips are the desired effect in that they reduce short delay echos from ceiling and floor.

Plenty of high end speakers take measures to have a wide horizontal pattern while constraining the vertical pattern.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: mzil on 15 January, 2013, 12:27:09 PM
Plenty of high end speakers take measures to have a wide horizontal pattern while constraining the vertical pattern.


So? Plenty of "high end" speakers recommend using bi-wiring, even though it is completely without merit or evidence that it has any audible consequence beyond the fact that the effective, overall thicker gauge of wire used across the room [double the number of strands of a traditional, single run] alters the L, C, and R of the wire [which in some circumstances may have consequences if the single run is, for example, too thin], but that can be easily duplicated simply by using a thicker single wire pair to a single set of speaker binging posts, from the get go. [Not to say that controlled directivity is "inaudible", and I agree in some instances is quite desirable.]

If one prioritizes a specific directivity pattern over a smooth, flat frequency response free of peaks and dips [not me], I'm sure there are any number of manipulations which can be applied. I agree with the author's AES paper (http://www.aes.org/e-lib/browse.cfm?elib=7586) which points out that MTM designs have response errors which are "not predicted by a simple lobing error analysis" that most speaker designers utilize.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: DonP on 15 January, 2013, 01:46:21 PM
I agree with the author's AES paper (http://www.aes.org/e-lib/browse.cfm?elib=7586) which points out that MTM designs have response errors which are "not predicted by a simple lobing error analysis" that most speaker designers utilize.


Nothing new about a speaker company dissing others while touting their own fix for the problems of the world.  At some point you are bound to see phrases like: " sets new standards for a speaker in its price class." (in quotes because it came from the author, but something like that appears in the literature of almost any speaker beyond the system-in-a-box class) 

If there was a fatal flaw in the motivation of constraining the vertical dispersion, I suppose the author would have addressed it, rather than ignoring it.
If the paper truly justified the death of  D'Appolito designs, that surely would have happened over the 17 years since it was published.  Thiele-Small concepts in speaker design took off like wildfire and dominated the industry in just a couple of years after publication.

I'm not saying MTM  is perfect, but it is a viable design layout with virtues that have stood the test of time.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: pawelq on 15 January, 2013, 02:46:33 PM
So I am using Adam A7 which are on my desktop and are connected to a sound card. Yet I am somehow reluctant to call them "desktop speakers", to put them into the same category as 1.5 inch $20 plastic computer speakers,
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: jimijabble on 15 January, 2013, 04:08:38 PM
I use Sony MDR-XB500 and some crummy speakers on my Lenovo laptop.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: mzil on 15 January, 2013, 05:12:24 PM
I'm not saying MTM  is perfect, but it is a viable design layout with virtues that have stood the test of time.

Just don't stand up while listening to them or you'll be in for a rude awakening.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: ExUser on 15 January, 2013, 05:54:01 PM
Bought myself a pair of Mackie Thump PAs for a ridiculously low price. There's no PA speakers option! Heh. I listen to my music through PA speakers more often than "hi-fi" speakers.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: krabapple on 16 January, 2013, 02:55:53 AM
5.1 system, Behringer 2030p monitors all around, home built Dayton sub.  Speaker EQ applied by AVR.  Pretty good bang for the bucks.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 16 January, 2013, 04:22:16 AM
I am somehow reluctant to call them "desktop speakers", to put them into the same category as 1.5 inch $20 plastic computer speakers


Price is not a point of interest in this poll, only usage.

There's no PA speakers option!


Forgive my ignorance: what are PA speakers, what's their usage and what are they connected to?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: RonaldDumsfeld on 16 January, 2013, 06:36:09 AM
My category isn't really covered in the poll. Which is a shame as it's becoming the popular option.

Whenever possible I listen to active desktop multimedia monitors (ADAM A3X). Which are not really hi-fi speakers. Connected via an audio interface (MOTU Ultralite). Which is not really a soundcard.

Tried various types of headphones but prefer to avoid using any of them whenever possible. If I had to choose a favourite under duress it would be the ever reliable and sturdy on ear Sennheiser HD 25-1 11. Never tried IEM or buds but I might consider doing so now I have a light and handy ultrabook type lappy.

For some strange reason I gave up listening to audio in the car about 15 years ago. Never figured out exactly why.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 16 January, 2013, 07:31:21 AM
Sounds like desktop speakers to me, by my definition anyway (self powered speakers placed on top of a desk and connected to a computer device).
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: KozmoNaut on 16 January, 2013, 08:44:56 AM
Hi-fi speakers, headphones, desktop speakers, a little bit of everything!

Audiovector C2 Mk II speakers, hi-fi speakers.
AIAIAI TMA-1 Studio headphones, circumaural headphones.
Sennheiser PX-100, supraaural headphones.
And of course the stock system in my car, which would obviously be car speakers.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: RonaldDumsfeld on 16 January, 2013, 10:12:14 AM
Quote
Sounds like desktop speakers to me


Not to start a row or anything in your excellent thread mate but I think you may be missing the point a little.

Your lists reflect what is rapidly becoming a collection of outdated paradigms.

In ye olden dayes we had a hi fi. With smiley face speakers which sounded good with music. Controlled via the pre amp options on the Integrated amp.  Or maybe an n.1  system  for video controlled via the receiver. Then there was, since that fateful day some time in the 9Ts when you discovered you could play audio on your PC, computer audio. Desktop speaker systems best for speech and games.

Now you can have it all. In one.

Quality multimedia speakers (& a sub if you want) which sound good with any program, music, speech, DVDs, DAWS. even instruments. All controlled via a multi channel, multi program audio interface. You can even keep the hi fi connected if you want. Or satellite speakers in the kitchen. Or talk to your mates over Skype on headphones and listen to music at the same time.

You see what I mean? Your poll options reflect a time when everything was separate. Now it's all integrated. I mention this not to cause friction but because anyone who hasn't sussed this yet is missing out and  deserves to be well advised.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: yourlord on 16 January, 2013, 10:44:48 AM
There's no PA speakers option!


Forgive my ignorance: what are PA speakers, what's their usage and what are they connected to?


PA speakers tend to be higher power full range speakers designed for use in relatively large open rooms or outdoors. That's a generalization as there are a LOT of types of PA speakers which address different applications.

Usually PA speakers attempt to target a mix of power and even frequency response.


Then you have guitar speakers which are designed for high power and good low-mid to hi-mid fidelity.

Then there are bass guitar speakers which are designed for very high power with large excursion to reproduce low frequency fundamental tones and their harmonics as well as decent mids.
Here is my bass guitar rig for example:
http://images.delusionalmind.com/equip/bob...cabs_021107.jpg (http://images.delusionalmind.com/equip/bob_amp_cabs_021107.jpg)
That's 2 x 15" and 8 x 10" speakers driven by a 700 watt head.

etc.. there are a lot of speaker designs out there..
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: DonP on 16 January, 2013, 10:53:26 AM
Forgive my ignorance: what are PA speakers, what's their usage and what are they connected to?


Someone already described them, but for origin, "PA"  meaning "Public Address"
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: ExUser on 16 January, 2013, 11:49:16 AM
(https://hydrogenaud.io/imgcache.php?id=00ea90373042fa6386b984cc3b61f739" rel="cached" data-warn="External image, click to view at original size" data-url="http://www.mackie.com/products/th-15a/photos/th15a-front.jpg)

How they look. XLR inputs, which I've got hooked into the balanced TRS outs on my E-MU 0404, with balanced-TRS->XLR adapters.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: BenB on 16 January, 2013, 12:51:42 PM
I'd say about 75% of my music listening happens at home, and about 85% of that is with 3-way studio monitors, another 10% with hi-fi speakers and the remaining 5% with circumaural headphones. The 25% of listening I do while on the go is a mixture of circumaural and supra-aural headphones, depending upon where I'm at and/or what I'm doing.

I couldn't vote in the poll as studio monitors don't rightly fit into any of the specified "kind of speaker" categories. The categorization appears to be geared more toward how or where the speakers are connected and not what they produce.

Studio monitors and PA speakers should have had a separate category together or individually, IMHO, as they differ in what they produce when compared to other speakers, esp. hi-fi speakers.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 16 January, 2013, 01:12:35 PM
My category isn't really covered in the poll. Which is a shame as it's becoming the popular option.

Whenever possible I listen to active desktop multimedia monitors (ADAM A3X). Which are not really hi-fi speakers. Connected via an audio interface (MOTU Ultralite). Which is not really a soundcard.
I couldn't vote in the poll as studio monitors don't rightly fit into any of the specified "kind of speaker" categories. The categorization appears to be geared more toward how or where the speakers are connected and not what they produce.

Studio monitors and PA speakers should have had a separate category together or individually, IMHO, as they differ in what they produce when compared to other speakers, esp. hi-fi speakers.
Darn, perhaps I should have waited rather than lumping my (albeit quite basic) home studio monitors into ‘desktop speakers’. And to confuse things further, I connect them to any old thing: iPod, computer, Line 6 POD X3 Live acting as a stompbox and/or as a USB-audio interface, synthesisers… So yes, I would have to agree with you both that the options provided do not cover enough possibilities, at least in our cases.

If skamp wants, I can add some other options and (re)allocate votes according to requests.

Canar: How about a size reference for that beast?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: ExUser on 16 January, 2013, 01:26:16 PM
Canar: How about a size reference for that beast?
635mm tall, 386mm wide, 335mm deep.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Nessuno on 16 January, 2013, 01:54:01 PM
Not to start a row or anything in your excellent thread mate but I think you may be missing the point a little.

Your lists reflect what is rapidly becoming a collection of outdated paradigms.

With due respect, I have to disagree with your disagreement.

I first connected my PC to my now 20+ years old integrated and speakers (the "hi-fi") via an external USB DAC in mid 2000s and since about then this has become my only source at home (apart from an FM tuner and very very occasionally some vinyl, say less than once a year).

This to say that while the backend feeding the low level signal has vastly changed over last few years, the front end feeding power to our ears has remained the same over the last fifty years or so. And all in all even a powered speaker is a integration of an integrated plus a speaker: nihil sub sole novi!
Maybe a real novelty could have the form of something like Dynaudio Xeo (http://www.dynaudio.com/int/home_loudspeaker_systems/xeo/xeo.php), which all in all is always the integration of a wireless receiver-decoder-converter plus an integrated plus speakers (like my current setup: Apple Airport Express > Rotel amp > Infinity speakers).

So willing to interpret Skamp's point of view which I do share, the distinction is in the way the speakers are placed relative to the listener: an "hi-fi" system is usually meant to be listened rather "far field", vice versa desktop speakers are usually listened very "near field".

All that said, in this very moment I'm writing on an iPad2 while listening to Etymotic IEMs plugged to it, connected to the shared library of my MacBook...
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 16 January, 2013, 02:54:34 PM
So willing to interpret Skamp's point of view which I do share, the distinction is in the way the speakers are placed relative to the listener: an "hi-fi" system is usually meant to be listened rather "far field", vice versa desktop speakers are usually listened very "near field".

This is fair enough, assuming skamp agrees with your interpretation. Just as I’d be happy to add options for monitors, PAs, and perhaps others, I could alternatively leave the current number of options but clarify them options with reference to usual listening distance and suchlike.

I’m not complaining about the poll, just looking for ways to make it easier for more people to participate. I’m sure we can think up a good balance between the number of options and the number of devices/contexts covered by each!
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: greynol on 16 January, 2013, 03:36:22 PM
"far field" ... "near field"

Then they should be labeled as such with a description of what they mean in order to avoid confusion.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 16 January, 2013, 03:42:22 PM
As Nessuno said, the distinction that I make about usage and equipment is like the difference between listening to a Hi-Fi setup fed by a standalone CD player while sitting on a couch, and listening to some FLACs through "desktop speakers" (monitors or whatever) connected somehow to a PC, while sitting at a desk.

I don't see a difference in usage between any "desktop speakers" (whatever their price is) and "studio monitors", if they all sit on a desk, if they're all self-powered and connected to some kind of PC audio device (soundcard, USB DAC, whatever). I also don't really see the particularity of PA speakers.

That said, my knowledge about speakers is very limited, as I almost never use any. So maybe you could come up with a list of options to add to the poll, describing precisely what they are, how they are used, what they're connected to, and generally speaking, what sets them apart.

Note: I'd like to reiterate that price and quality are not within the scope of this poll, notably because price is not an accurate indicator of quality, and quality is quite subjective.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: ExUser on 16 January, 2013, 03:55:04 PM
The only PC audio device these could connect to is one with balanced outputs. Usually those are only found on mixing boards and "pro audio equipment", which is what the E-MU is designed for.

Relax, though, it's just a silly poll.  We're having a nice discussion as a consequence. I'd suggest you relax and let it settle down before rushing to change things.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 16 January, 2013, 03:55:26 PM
I don't see a difference in usage between any "desktop speakers" (whatever their price is) and "studio monitors", if they all sit on a desk, if they're all self-powered and connected to some kind of PC audio device (soundcard, USB DAC, whatever).
But studio monitors do not need to be connected to a PC, whether directly or indirectly, and neither do speakers more traditionally associated with computing. In my example, I can connect devices directly to my monitors, or I can connect via my POD X3 Live to apply effects, and the POD may or may not be connected to a PC and acting as a USB audio interface and mixer.  I’ve connected my portable players directly to tinny old £5 Time speakers in the past, cheerfully violating their assumed purpose as computer speakers. Surely I’m not the only person who has speakers, whether they’re marketed as monitors or for computers or as something else, that are not part of a hi-fi system and to which I connect things other than a computer?

Quote
I also don't really see the particularity of PA speakers.
Whilst I don’t think there would be many users listening through a PA on a regular basis, it’s perhaps worth having as a separate option for precisely this reason, not to mention the different experience and contexts associated with this type of equipment.

Quote
That said, my knowledge about speakers is very limited, as I almost never use any. So maybe you could come up with a list of options to add to the poll, describing precisely what they are, how they are used, what they're connected to, and generally speaking, what sets them apart.
I’ve said as much as I can offer on the possible options, so I’ll leave it to others to put in their suggestions. I do think more options would be a great benefit, in any case.

Edit: Having just seen greynol’s post, which was also already my opinion, I’m at least going to add those qualifiers to the existing options. Edit: Or am I? It rapidly begins to get confusing, so I think more options would be a better change, if any is to be made.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Nessuno on 16 January, 2013, 04:31:50 PM
Let's see if this fits: "desktop speakers" =  placed on the same desk at which the listener is seated. "Hi-fi speakers" = at a distance from the listener comparable with the dimensions of the room in which they are listened to.
This to reflect the way people think to (and use) a desktop computer or an hi-fi system.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: greynol on 16 January, 2013, 04:36:47 PM
This is suggesting that desktop speakers cannot be high-fidelity.  There is simply no weaseling out of it.

I had crafted a post and decided to leave it alone thinking there was mutual understanding and agreement.  I may have been too quick in assuming.

Near Field = desktop speakers and monitors

Far Field = PA speakers and traditional stereo speakers which stand on the floor or on stands/shelves individually.

I have no idea how to classify surround speakers.

Active/passive should not play a role.  Who cares where the amplifier resides?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 16 January, 2013, 04:44:27 PM
I do think that a distinction must be made between near- and far-field speakers at a minimum. I guess those two categories would generally correlate with floor- vs. table-mounted, too.

However, I (personally) think this dichotomy is still limiting and would prefer a breakdown into types. Just in terms of my limited imagination about speakers, we already have: speakers bundled with a hi-fi, n.1 surround, PA speakers, computer speakers, monitors, docks…

I recognise the danger of not getting too bogged-down in semantics and debate rather than just letting the poll progress, but I feel that a good balance, somewhere between too few options and too much complexity, would really enhance the ability of people to participate and provide an interesting set of data.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Nessuno on 16 January, 2013, 05:40:05 PM
This is suggesting that desktop speakers cannot be high-fidelity.

Me? Not at all! I haven't used any sonic attribute on purpose. It's only a question of how you use, not how much you can enjoy them. As a matter of fact, when one says "hi-fi system" or even "stereo system", as well as "desktop", people think to a rather precise image, without actual direct SQ implications.
If we then want not to use the term "fidelity", let's find another one: "floorstanding"? (even if they could be on stands)

Please, do consider also that English is not my first language, so I could very well miss some semantic nuances.

P.S. By the way: some people, me among them, like very much to listen to small, neutral, high fidelity speakers from little distance, comfortably seated on a couch or an armchair. This practice is generally referred to as near field listening opposed to far field listening, where the listener and the speakers are placed toward opposite sides of the room. There are, fidelity wise, many advantages and some drawbacks in doing this.

Edit: reading again your (Greynol's) last post, I agree with those two definitions. And, yes, active/passive play no role.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: yourlord on 16 January, 2013, 05:42:37 PM
So what does this qualify as?

(https://hydrogenaud.io/imgcache.php?id=a0e20f41491198acf1ef75ab4413150e" rel="cached" data-warn="External image, click to view at original size" data-url="http://www.treborlogic.com/anon_pics/mystation1.jpg)

That was my computer station circa 2001. Under the desk you'll notice 2 filing cabinets, and outside those are 2 3-way floor speakers (similar to the ones on my current home theater). The 3 way speakers on top of the desk are still the speakers I use today. At that time those 4 speakers were all driven by a quad channel receiver at 100W per channel.

Now the 2 top speakers are driven by a 5.1 channel receiver at 100W per channel.

Back then signal was fed from the line out of my computer to the receiver.. Today the signal is S/PDIF to the receiver from the computer..

Would that old setup qualify as desktop speakers or hi-fi? They are used for near-field, and the only signal they ever play comes from my computer., but they are quite obviously not self powered little plastic speakers..
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: greynol on 16 January, 2013, 05:55:22 PM
Please consider what the "fi" is hi-fi means.  At the same time I will try to remember the silly little hammocks that people used to use to hang speakers from their ceilings, even if it causes me to become slightly nauseated (the silly visual, not being in a hammock). 

Anyway, this has been fun.  Especially youlord's picture in the previous post.  I guess those speakers are adequately shielded.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Engelsstaub on 17 January, 2013, 02:16:01 AM
So what does this qualify as?
...


What kind of 3-way bookshelf speakers are those that were on your desktop? (...also: if you still have that Seventh Son of a Seventh Son tapestry would you please send it to me?    Seriously though; that's my absolute favorite Iron Maiden album. It's a tough call but it wins in my opinion. NotB would be next on my list.)
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 17 January, 2013, 04:16:34 AM
You guys are giving me a headache! 

So, what should we add? Note that there are only 3 slots left in the speaker poll.

  • Studio monitors
  • PA speakers
  • Surround sound speakers
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: RonaldDumsfeld on 17 January, 2013, 06:48:49 AM
I was going to suggest 'console tops' to distinguish monitors from desktop and/or hi-fi? Although mine actually on top of a set of stands....

Was quite taken by Nessuno suggestion of classification by the physical posture of the listener. i.e.

Sitting down on a couch = Hi Fi.
Sitting up at a desk = desktop.
Standing up (probably crowd surfing in canar's case) = Sound Re-inforcement.
All of the above = console or stand top.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Nessuno on 17 January, 2013, 07:17:37 AM
Was quite taken by Nessuno suggestion of classification by the physical posture of the listener. i.e.

I first refrained from suggesting another one based on listener's state of mind in approaching music reproduced by speakers (i.e. relaxed, attentive, careless, concentrated on something else...) as it would have been too subjectivist and maybe against TOS#8.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 17 January, 2013, 09:15:18 AM
So, what should we add? Note that there are only 3 slots left in the speaker poll.
  • Studio monitors
  • PA speakers
  • Surround sound speakers
I thought of exactly three other types to suggest, and they were exactly these three.

I think these would help a lot and [crosses fingers] cover most users.

A category-based classification (near, far, floor, table, etc.) might be more inclusive in theory, but at least to me, it seems like it would be quite nightmarish to agree on options and avoid glaring exceptions, someone’s unique hybrid technology, semantics, and so on.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 17 January, 2013, 09:21:50 AM
I'll leave it to you to make the changes to the poll, then
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 17 January, 2013, 09:53:58 AM
Done, and…

Bought myself a pair of Mackie Thump PAs for a ridiculously low price. There's no PA speakers option! Heh. I listen to my music through PA speakers more often than "hi-fi" speakers.
Vote added.

My category isn't really covered in the poll. Which is a shame as it's becoming the popular option. Whenever possible I listen to active desktop multimedia monitors (ADAM A3X).
I can’t conclusively tell from your wording: Did you vote or not? If not, I can allocate your vote now.

I couldn't vote in the poll as studio monitors don't rightly fit into any of the specified "kind of speaker" categories.
Vote added.

Darn, perhaps I should have waited rather than lumping my (albeit quite basic) home studio monitors into ‘desktop speakers’.
Vote moved.

If anyone else would like their vote to be moved after seeing the three added options, please PM me.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: krabapple on 17 January, 2013, 10:32:33 AM
You guys are giving me a headache! 

So, what should we add? Note that there are only 3 slots left in the speaker poll.

  • Studio monitors
  • PA speakers
  • Surround sound speakers



Isn't really meaningful.  My speakers are called 'monitors', but I don't listen in the near field, and I do use 5 of them to make a surround system.  Any speaker can serve as a 'surround sound speaker'.  Indeed the 'official' DVD-A /SACD speaker setup recommendation calls for full-range towers all around.

Whether speakers are usefully classified into 'nearfield' or 'farfield' is less clear.  I suppose a 'nearfield' speaker would be one designed to sound best in the near field -- meaning it has poor off-axis performance. 
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: mzil on 17 January, 2013, 12:39:36 PM
In the interest of keeping things straightforward and fairly unambiguous, the following three (well, four) questions are what I would be most interested in for the speaker section:

-How many total speakers (both full range and/or "satellites") are in your main system, even if you may limit the number used, per type of sound reproduction [for example, only using 2 for stereo music]?
1,2,3,4,5,6,7, or more

-How many subs do you have?
None, 1, 2, more [Note: A full range speaker with a dedicated input for a sub signal counts as a sub]

-Regarding the front left and right main speakers only, did the manufacturer intend them to be used in the near field, far field, either/not sure? ["mid-field" speakers are included in "either/not sure" as well as speakers with a switch for this distinction]

- When listening to 2-channel sources, do you typically use more than just 2 speakers in total? [Sub(s) used not included in your number of speakers.]

Things I don't personally care about: size, ipod docking, are you in a car, cabinet material, stands/shelf/mounting or any other elevation methods, driver complement, amplifier location, marketing/buzz words which don't have strict definitions like "digital ready", "pro", "studio", or "monitor", built-in equalization circuits (not to say that such circuits aren't quite useful in many instances, I just don't think adding categories for them will help keep the poll simple and easy to answer unambiguously).

But that's just what interests me.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: RonaldDumsfeld on 17 January, 2013, 03:11:59 PM
Quote
I can’t conclusively tell from your wording: Did you vote or not? If not, I can allocate your vote now.


Er. To be honest.  I voted twice.

So strictly speaking we need to subtract 1 from both 'hi-fi speakers connected to an amp' and 'desktop speakers connected to a sound card' and add 1 to 'stand mount monitor speakers connected to an audio interface' or whatever it has become.

I find it interesting that the people with active monitors connected to an audio interface mostly consider it is a separate category whereas those that don't, er, don't.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 17 January, 2013, 04:04:50 PM
Er. To be honest.  I voted twice.

So strictly speaking we need to subtract 1 from both 'hi-fi speakers connected to an amp' and 'desktop speakers connected to a sound card' and add 1 to 'stand mount monitor speakers connected to an audio interface' or whatever it has become.
Haha – you’re not the only person who’s asked for this exact change.  I’ll do that now.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: DonP on 17 January, 2013, 04:21:28 PM
"2.1" counts as surround?  Isn't that just a sat/sub setup (all in front)?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: db1989 on 17 January, 2013, 04:43:05 PM
Yeah, I’ve edited the name in response to your post.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: greynol on 17 January, 2013, 07:05:19 PM
It is still completely unclear to me as to whether this poll is trying to determine what types of speakers people use, how they are being used/misused or both (or neither?).  What is the point exactly?

The first question asks about devices, to me this would mean something along the lines of a player which, in keeping with the title of the poll would contain speakers (eg: tablet, boom-box, laptop, home theater system).  Why not use a less vague term to describe types of transducers since that is what is being listed.  Now let's look at the devices listed and relate them to the follow-up questions.  The last three items in the first question are specific entries in the third question, whereas the first item in the first question is the general category of the second question which is essentially already captured as a null vote in the second question.  This is a mess!

We could fix this by changing the first question to "Which do you use to listen to music most often?" and give speakers and headphones as the only two options.  Unfortunately this leaves out some things I'm personally interested in knowing, which is whether people are still using conventional types of sound systems such as two-channel stereos, multichannel home theaters and personal media players or are they moving towards things like tablets and laptops (using the built-in speakers).  What about >2 channel audio?  Is it becoming more popular, less popular or is it staying the same?  In other words, I like that the word "devices" is being used, but wish that it was actually being used in a broader sense instead of being just a synonym for transducer.

Oh, and another speaker type to throw in the mix (since that appears to be the trend of the conversation irrespective of my stated concern about the point of the poll) which is getting increasingly popular these days: sound bars.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: RonaldDumsfeld on 17 January, 2013, 08:03:56 PM
The OP wrote.

Quote
You guys are giving me a headache! wink.gif


It could be a lot worse. Three pages so far without the indignity of a #TOS violation.

Par for the course really.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: greynol on 17 January, 2013, 10:32:38 PM
To spend time attempting to perfect polls, like we do with discussions on listening tests?

Yep, par for the course when technogeeks converge. 
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Nessuno on 18 January, 2013, 03:28:23 AM
At first it seemed to me the emphasis was more on listening habits than on specific devices: speakers or headphones, at home from a conventional system, from desktop speakers while using a PC, at work, walking, driving, commuting etc... and if you give a look at page #1 of this thread you'll find that this is the way people started answering, until someone started asking where to put his very specific gear and geekness found its way in!

Now if, say, someone likes to listen to Pubblic Address systems at home, fine, simply in spite of the definition they are not used for pubblic address, but the (my?) question is still: does she/he uses them to listen "the old way" (which is, like it or not, far-field) or "the multimedia PC age way" (which is near-field, isn't it)?

I also told that it's about ten years now I use a PC as my first source and still I don't have speakers on top of my desk, so swapping a TT with a CD player and then with a PC didn't change that much my listening habits. And far/near filed is only a way to see things for simplicity sake, not an absolute category: I am the first exception, because as I said I like to listen near-field with conventional systems and in conventional ways (that is sitting on a couch, concentrating on music, relaxing... even petting with my lady! )

Maybe I'm biased by age, I remember when the choices for not too weird SQ where between an "hi-fi system" or a cassette Walkman and so my expectations on poll answers are different from others and even from Skamp's ones.

By the way: Skamp, what do you exactly wanted to know from people round here when you conceived this poll?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: skamp on 18 January, 2013, 04:15:20 AM
By the way: Skamp, what do you exactly wanted to know from people round here when you conceived this poll?


How they listen to music and what they use. I'm not sure why some people are confused, and they're confusing the hell out of me!
Edit: I guess some of you would be more comfortable with one poll listing devices, and another listing usages.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Ed Seedhouse on 22 January, 2013, 03:19:47 PM
It is still completely unclear to me as to whether this poll is trying to determine what types of speakers people use, how they are being used/misused or both (or neither?).  What is the point exactly?


Well, I don't see the point of web surveys at all, since there is never any possibility of a random sample and so no possible way to generalize the results.  Since this kind of poll doesn't have any scientific value, I wonder why it is even available on H.A.  Is it not removable in the software?
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: ExUser on 22 January, 2013, 03:29:23 PM
Since this kind of poll doesn't have any scientific value, I wonder why it is even available on H.A.  Is it not removable in the software?
(https://hydrogenaud.io/imgcache.php?id=0c1cbad0aa0f6ed1172a01cfafb529df" rel="cached" data-warn="External image, click to view at original size" data-url="http://i.imgur.com/VjPqWVm.jpg)
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: chevbe2403 on 20 March, 2015, 06:11:33 PM
What kind of speakers do you use for listening to music? Speakers, headphones, IEMs, earbuds… Multiple choices are allowed to reflect different use cases.


Pardon my late entry here, I am a forum newbie.  I chose headphones / laptop speakers / circumaural (stationary). I do virtually all of my listening through headphones versus speakers since I live in an apartment complex and don't want to bother anyone. I got a pair of Sennheiser HD598s recently and I don't think I can ever go back to anything else  as the sound quality has been simply amazing so far. Personally I've never been a fan of earbuds or other in-ear 'phones for various reasons.
Title: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: ChrisMini on 15 July, 2015, 01:22:53 AM
I have HiFiMAN HE-400 headphones with CablePros custom cables. They have full sized planar magnetic drivers, similar to electrostatics, but don't need special amp. The downside is they're a bit on the heavy side, need a quality dedicated headphone amp, and leak like crazy. Totally unsuitable for public listening. Have a dedicated USB DAC and amp, both by HeadRoom, both discontinued. Dell laptop. Everything plugged into a PS Audio Duet AC line filter and surge and spike protection, also discontinued. This device set me back $300, but worth every penny. All lossless files.(ALAC, AIFF)
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: rawlive on 18 April, 2016, 02:20:06 PM
Hello

I thought this might be a good place for my inaugural HydrogenAudio post.

These days I mainly listen to music on a pair of Beats Solo HD's. I know, I know. I was prejudice against Beats products for years. I was loyal to my $70 AUD Sennheiser HD202's for over a decade. However, I'll eat my words, the sound that comes out of Beats cans sounds better to me now than any other h/phones out. Perhaps my ears have changed.

(Relevant note: I bought some Shure headphones once. They lasted a week. Ill fitting, and treble that gave bad, bad, bad listener fatigue.)

As for speakers: well, my favourite 2.1's ever ... and I'm ready to get flamed for this too. Creative Gigaworks T3. Man. I never would've thought. Two little satellites and the 3 driver subby. Everyone comments on how incredible they sound. I've had an issue common to them however, the controller has a low quality pot which stuffs up after a while. Repaired it myself, no worries.

That's all. Cheers.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: eligasht on 19 April, 2016, 01:11:58 AM
just sennheiser  8)  8)
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: antz on 19 April, 2016, 04:33:37 AM
I use an "old school" stereo - CD player/amp/2 speakers setup - since my living room is just not suitable for anything more ambitious. I also use IEMS - Shure SE215 fed off a Sansa Clip+ or sometimes tablet/Android phone. My ears are old enough that neither they, nor my wallet, justify (say) the SE425. I've had various IEMs over the years but they all fall apart bar the Shures, which seem to be very durable (and Shure's backup is exemplary). I still have some E2s but they don't really get used nowadays.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: rewjr on 12 May, 2016, 11:08:14 PM
I use Mirage M3 floor standing speakers + HK subwoofer for 2.1 audio setup using BK amp and Marantz pre-pro DAC with Media PC running Foobar 2000 .
I also have NAD Viso HP - 50 over the ear headphones simply amazing dynamics with room feel tech on board.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: includemeout on 16 June, 2016, 11:38:10 PM
Desktop speakers (also my main rig): Microlab Solo 1C plugged via a USB Burr-Brown DAC;

Headphones: My old faithful pair of Sennheiser HD-580 headphones.

That, couple with my concluding the -alt preset standard-MP3 files I encoded back in 2003 sound as transparent as ever to me (even more so now, with my being 13 years older), I finally can say I've put my mind at rest regarding which encoder type (lossy), format (MP3) and settings (--preset standard) I'm sticking to (possibly for the rest of my life) - no qualms about it.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: jumpingjackflash5 on 17 June, 2016, 01:38:52 AM
Last year I have upgraded withing my small budget to Audigy FX (ALC 898) on desktop and Fiio X1 on mobile. Common old amp+loudspeakers in the room (jvc mx-d701t). For headphones I have A-Jays Two and this year I have added RHA MA750 - great sound, but a little bit weighty for longer use.

As for the format I prefer FLAC lossless whenever possible. Space is a non-issue for audio these days.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: KozmoNaut on 17 June, 2016, 02:51:37 AM
It's been more than three years, everything has been upgraded.

In the living room:
Adam A5X studio monitors
Dali SWA-12 subwoofers

In the bedroom:
JBL 4410 studio monitors

In the kitchen:
Dali Concept 1 speakers

Out and about:
SoundMAGIC E10 IEMs
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Funkstar De Luxe on 17 June, 2016, 05:57:15 AM
2x MOTU 24I/O
Yamaha HS80M & Sub
MidiDSP

HD600 headphones and a Shiit Lyr amp.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: JacobAllison on 19 June, 2016, 06:13:51 AM
In general headphones, as I live in a Japanese apartment.

But, I do have a pair of LSR-305s.


Source Components
  • Oppo HA-1
  • Denon DP-300F Turntable
  • Oppo HA-2 Portable DAC/AMP
  • Massdrop ODAC (work use)
  • Audio Technica AT-HA26D AMP/DAC (Not generally in use, replaced by HA-1)
  • HiFiMeDIY 9018 Async USB Dac (Not generally in use, replaced by HA-2)

Amplification
  • Oppo HA-1
  • Schiit Valhalla 2
  • Massdrop O2 Amp (Work use)
  • Stax 252s
  • Audio Technica AT-HA26D AMP/DAC (Not generally in use)

Transducers
  • Audeze LCD-2
  • Stax L300
  • Oppo PM-3
  • Massdrop/Fostex TH-X00 (if they ever get here!)
  • BeyerDynamic DT-990 600ohm
  • Massdrop/AKG K7xx
  • Philips Fidelio L2
  • Audio Technica M50x (Work Use)
  • Sony 7506 (Camera/ENG on-ear monitors)
  • JBL LSR-305 Studio Monitors (Desk Monitor)
  • M-Audio AV-30 Studio Monitors (Work Desk Monitors)



In addition to a host of recording gear that doesn't particularly need to be listed here.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: f1eng on 04 July, 2016, 11:48:12 AM
Just saw this poll. I have retired now, so almost always listen using speakers. I have Goldmund Epilog 1&2 and Tune Audio Anima to choose from in my listening room.
When I worked I was on an aeroplane weekly and I used Etymotic ear plug types with a custom ear mould. I have some over ear headphones which I use infrequently. After listening to a few I found the AKG Q701 had the most natural bass, I mainly listen to classical music.
I actually have a lot of headphones, which is silly since I rarely listen on headphones any more.
I never listen to music in the car, I find it distracting and the background noise level means orchestral music is unlistenable.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Foodbar2000 on 15 August, 2016, 08:57:07 PM
Headphones 90% of the time
(Sennheiser Amperior,HD518.AKG K501)

Speakers 10% of the time
(Cambridge audio Topaz am5+Mordaunt short m10;s.All low end stuff)

My room had terrible flutter and/or echo though.
http://vocaroo.com/i/s1obupGEy6bx
[edit,this is the sound of hands clapping in my fluttering room.I had to use my laptop since my pc(and thus my better mic) are unusable]

Havent bothered to correct it,so headphones it is!
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: happy58 on 15 June, 2017, 01:22:22 AM
would like to start new topic I have a kr4400 kenwood receiver and have just purchased some Micca MB42X Bookshelf Speakers what else beside speaker wire do I need to get also have a new 55 inch TV coming soon will i be able to use the speakers with it. I know nothing about hooking this all up.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: adamOLC on 06 July, 2017, 01:49:56 PM
All of my listening is done on portable devices so I always use IEMs.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: apastuszak on 06 July, 2017, 10:45:47 PM
This is a "depends on the situation" post for me.

I work form home and usually use my speakers connected to my stereo.

When my kids get home from school, I switch over to headphones.

Obviously when I am out grocery shopping, or shopping in general, I use headphones.

I  do find some music sounds better on speakers while other music sounds better on headphones.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: Arnold B. Krueger on 16 July, 2017, 08:58:05 AM
 I listen at home over LCR LSR 308s over 2 independently located and equalized subwoofers driven by a Denon AVR that takes in audio via Toslink from an LG OLEDB6 65" 4K TV.  I have an Android box that augments the locked down LG proprietary computer in the "Smart" TV.

My Chrysler 200C has a premium sound system that was designed by some of my friends and acquaintances who are infotainment developers at Chrysler. Standing still, it performs on a par with some of the better studio monitors. I have a 192 GB flash drive library of about 10,000 high-bitrate MP3 that I ripped from my 1,500+ disc CD collection.

I also have tracks from that library loaded on my Samsung S5 Android phone  with internal 192GB uSD flash drive and similarily equipped Nvidia Shield Android K6 tablet. 

 The TV and the Arris cable box can browse the full 400 GB+ music library via the household LAN.  So can the Android phones/tablet/TV Box, but it is easier to work with local inside-the-box libraries.

I have a fairly extensive collection of IEMs and headphones including Sennheiser HD380s, 280s, and wireless, Sony MDR 7506 and MDR 900, as well as Audio Technica ATH M50 and 500 headphones.
Title: Re: How do you listen to music? Speakers, headphones, which types, etc.
Post by: wqcr on 21 July, 2017, 04:50:25 AM
My most favoured setups:
Portable - Sansa Clip Zip + VE Monk Plus (EQed for flat response)
Listening outside in quiet environment - Sansa Clip Zip (with optional JDSLabs O2) + AKG K240DF (with faux leather pads)
Home/Studio use - AKG K601 with respective source
In my parent's home - AQ 639 with whatever source available

I settled on this after about 10 years of switching gears and IMHO this works best for me.
Can't really recommend using smart phone for mobile setups, as the extra weight and power consumption is rarely worth it. Zip has pretty awesome real life parameters to cover basically every listening situation, on top of being one of the most power efficient music gadgets, requiring no more than 30mW for FLAC playback (compare 860mW for Fiio X3II or 1245mW for X5II).