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Topic: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips? (Read 476 times) previous topic - next topic
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When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

For Vinyl, do you include any of these words "Vinyl Rip", "LP", or something like "LP 24-96", "LP 24-192" in the name of the album?

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #1
I don't, but I do identify videos "ripped" from VHS.   I usually remember what albums I digitized because I only digitize vinyl when it's not available digitally.

...And I don't use 24/96 or 24/192 for "scratchy old records".  :P  

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #2
The last vinyl I recorded from was only available in either vinyl or audio cassette tape, never CD. I recorded it at 44.1/16 using a USB turntable, and then cleaned it up a number of times with different methods using iZotope RX. Each time, I reverted to the original recording prior to trying newer methods and versions. The last version, I spliced up using Logic Pro, then saved to individual FLACs. The only thing really differentiating it from a CD rip is that the tracknumber field is filled with "A#" or "B#" depending on the side of the record.

For future work, I may consider using 96 or 192 and 24 bits, if possible, but only for the initial recording, and not for the final output. If only to give the processing plugins something more to chew on. They're already working in 32 bit floating point, extra frequency resolution would probably help with profiling noise versus signal. I'd still keep 44.1/16 or *maybe* 24 for final output, though. And I'd keep the multi-stage RX project files that maintain the full revision history of the work going back to the initial recording. Those come out to about 2.5-3GB per side.

Like DVDdoug, I'd only bother with this process for rare albums that never made it to a digital release. I'm not in the habit of even collecting vinyl for any other reason.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #3
Include the this information in the tags. It is not important to be visible all the time in the directory structure. For example, Media = Vinyl or Media = 12'' Vinyl, or whatever you like.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #4
For Vinyl and Tape rips I use a tag "VINYLTAPESIDE" to identify the side of the tape or record.  An extremely rarely used feature of my music library that prefers digital sources or anything be produced like it's going to end up on a CD somehow.  This tag is specifically required and reserved for anything that comes on a tape or vinyl record that has 2 sides that has been digitalized.

Each track number is per disc or tape not per side in my library.

For discs with their own names I simply use "DISCSUBTITLE" (Vorbis Comment or ApeV2 tags), or "TSST" (ID3v2 tags).

I don't have a source identifier for my library but I could easily make one up or Google what it is specified in existing metadata formats.

There's different ways of tackling this kind of thing.  Use whatever works for you and your library.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #5
I like to search my library from a starting point of the "Album Title" tag so I tend to amend that tag so it it searchable for all sorts of things e.g. "Album Title" = "Thriller [Vinyl Rip]", or Thriller [mp3], or Thriller [Surround]
If there is both a Hi-res version and a CD red book rip "Thriller [HD]" or  "Thriller [CD]".

You can amend any tags which you find will be useful for searching your library according to your needs. Another obvious one to use may be to create new genres amending the genre tag e.g. "Pop [Vinyl Rip]".

This may be a no-no if you plan to use something like Roon software for playing your music because album identification will take a hit. If you use Foobar2000 or Kodi like I do amending tags works well.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #6
The only reason I want to rip certain Vinyl records is because their CD versions are so loud and compressed that they are unpleasant to listen to on a computer. I'm talking about certain CDs released after 1995 such as Aerosmith's Get a Grip or Van Halen's Balance. The CD rips sound like garbage, but the Vinyl Rips sounds fine even with pops they're more pleasant to listen to.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #7
The CD rips sound like garbage, but the Vinyl Rips sounds fine even with pops they're more pleasant to listen to.

Most media players do think tracks belong to an album if the [ALBUM] and [ARTIST] tags are the same.
So having both the CD rip and the vinyl rip you need something to differentiate be it "LP" or "CD" added to the album tag.
TheWellTemperedComputer.com

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #8
Most media players do think tracks belong to an album if the [ALBUM] and [ARTIST] tags are the same.
So having both the CD rip and the vinyl rip you need something to differentiate be it "LP" or "CD" added to the album tag.

Roseval makes a very important point. It is the reason I began amending the Album Title tag where there are more than one version.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #9
One way to make sure they are differentiated, would be to use a different file format than FLAC. Like, WavPack with embedded cuesheet if you don't want to do the job of splitting the files, and then edit the cuesheet if track transition times are off. For a starting point you can hope to find a cuesheet that works at https://www.regeert.nl/cuesheet/ .

Media = Vinyl or Media = 12'' Vinyl, or whatever you like.
Beware that if you at some stage run a masstagging job with an external source, this "whatever you like" may be overwritten if that application also "likes it". IIRC, musicbrainz tagging might use something like MEDIA TYPE, MEDIATYPE or MEDIA_TYPE.

So I use ALBUMVERSION. Both for different CD masterings and for different media sources.
High Voltage socket-nose-avatar

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #10
According to the mappings on the Picard site it's MEDIA for both Ape and Vorbis, same with the Foobar2000 tagger component. But it breaks down Vinyl into dimensions. Masstagging can change the metadata in many ways (capitalization, adding suffixes to track names, wrong cat numbers), and shouldn't be done lightly.

I see a post highlighting different interpretations in ID3 (TMED), but that is only for mp3 and related.

Re: When you rip Vinyl records to FLAC how do differentiate them from CD rips?

Reply #11
[...]  I'd still keep 44.1/16 or *maybe* 24 for final output, though. And I'd keep the multi-stage RX project files that maintain the full revision history of the work going back to the initial recording. Those come out to about 2.5-3GB per side.

If I a may ask why 44.1kHz instead of 48kHz? I mean most sound cards convert to 48kHz right?

 
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