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Topic: Romeo and Compatiability (Read 3113 times) previous topic - next topic
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Romeo and Compatiability

What OS support the Romeo filesystem?
Is it more compatible with Older OS than UDF?
Has anyone gotten any problems reading Romeo discs on Windows 9X/XP/Linux?

Does the Iriver SlimX recognize Romeo discs slower than UDF discs?

Has anyone tried this, Burning Software That Supports Really, Really, Long Filenames - Does It Exist??

Thx...
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you."

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #1
If a moderator sees this please change Compatiability to Compatibility.
Thanks.
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you."

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #2
Is Romeo just another term for 'Rock Ridge'?

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #3
I tried that SONY CD-EXTREME...
1. My SlimX recognised Romeo faster than UDF
2. I used NTI CD-MAKER and Sony CD-EXTREME
3. CD-EXTREME is realy cool if you need long filenames, has more features (also Joilet 112 that works like 64 :-))
4. However my CD-EXTREM version doesn't support some filesystems that come with the latest CD-EXTREM (the latest one somewhy don't want to run on my PC)
5. Romeo doesn't support cyrillic fonts (I think doesn't matter for you)
Ogg Vorbis for music and speech [q-2.0 - q6.0]
FLAC for recordings to be edited
Speex for speech

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #4
Quote
Has anyone tried this, Burning Software That Supports Really, Really, Long Filenames - Does It Exist??

Yes. I used it to free HDD space by burning mpc albums to CD-R, so compatibility with standalone/portable mp3 CD devices is not an issue for me.

One "problem" I noticed:

In Windows Explorer (Win98) all directories and files are shown correctly, e.g.
Code: [Select]
Orishas  (2002)  Emigrante
Orishas  (1999)  A lo cubano
but in DOS Window the directory names look like this:
Code: [Select]
ORISHAS(       <DIR>        13.04.03   0:02 Orishas  (1999)  A lo cubano
ORISHAS(       <DIR>        13.04.03   0:02 Orishas  (2002)  Emigrante
and not
Code: [Select]
ORISHA~1       <DIR>        13.04.03   0:02 Orishas  (1999)  A lo cubano
ORISHA~2       <DIR>        13.04.03   0:02 Orishas  (2002)  Emigrante
as it should be.
Let's suppose that rain washes out a picnic. Who is feeling negative? The rain? Or YOU? What's causing the negative feeling? The rain or your reaction? - Anthony De Mello

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #5
If you're actually looking for a proggie that can burn very long filenames, here's a good one:
Burnatonce
It supports 'ISO9660:1999':
'Allows 207 characters for folder/filenames and removes the limit upon how many levels deep the folders are are allowed to be. All ASCII characters (including lowercase) are currently allowed also.'
(from the helpfile of burnatonce 0.96)

I tried it, it's cool.
sic transit gloria mundi...

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #6
But don't forget, as I know Romeo isn't DOS compatible.
Ogg Vorbis for music and speech [q-2.0 - q6.0]
FLAC for recordings to be edited
Speex for speech

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #7
Yes, I know BAO can do 207 characters, my question was:

Is it compatible with Windows 9x/NT?
Does the SlimX recognize these 207 ISO6990:1990 discs?
Does the SlimX recognize them faster or slower than Romeo or UDF discs?

Thanks for your Input
"You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you."

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #8
Romeo is an extension to the ISO 9660 filesystem. If your player/OS can't recognize the extension, it will read the base filesystem (what means, 8.3 filenames)

AFAIK, the only OS that supports Romeo is Windows. Dunno about hardware players.

Romeo and Compatiability

Reply #9
Romeo is totally different to ISO9660:1999.  The later is an actual standard while Romeo is even less of a standard than Joliet might claim to be!

As for compatibilty - you will most likely have trouble with ISO9660:1999 in true dos or earlier windows systems although that shouldn't matter since you want these names for your mp3 player right? 

I have tested ISO9660:1999 as an alternative to Joliet for my in car mp3 player since joliet discs take ages to load.  ISO9660:1999 load almost instantly and the names are recognised correctly.  I haven't yet checked if really long names are displayed fully but even ifthe player cuts them off a little I wouldn't mind since that's what ID3 is for! 

Jamie

 
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