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Topic: Ripping DVD-A Disks Question (Read 2494 times) previous topic - next topic
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Ripping DVD-A Disks Question

I have been using DVD Audio Explorer to rip the 24/96 stereo tracks from various DVD-A disks. However, some don't apparently have the ability to "Get Stereo Downmix" so I tried the "Merge Groups" option. This seems to create a single file (wav/flac) at 96/24 but seems to have all the channels. My question then is this file playable and basically the same as a stereo downmix? And if I have albums with the stereo track that shows in DVD Audio Explorer  "Copying:Restricted, 1 copy; Audio Quality: 2 ch/48 kHz/16bit", but the multichannel tracks are 24/96, would I be better off NOT using the stereo downmix and use the "Merge Groups" to get 24/96? Sorry about my ignorance here, this is the first time I am trying to rip my dvd-a disks. Basically I just want to get the higest bit-rate/quality rips of all my DVD-A disks

Ripping DVD-A Disks Question

Reply #1
I've never ripped an DVD audio, so I'm not sure about this...  (And, I don't think we are supposed to mention software that cracks copy protection.)

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This seems to create a single file (wav/flac) at 96/24 but seems to have all the channels. My question then is this file playable and basically the same as a stereo downmix?
  It depends on what you're playing it on.    If you're playing the file on your computer and you have a 5.1 channel soundcard, you'll get all six channels.  Or, most 5.1 channel soundcards have an option in their driver utility to downmix.    With a stereo card, I think you'll get only the left & right channels.  If you select some material with a strong center channel, or strong rear channel content, you should be able to test that.

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...would I be better off NOT using the stereo downmix and use the "Merge Groups" to get 24/96?
Since you apparently want stereo, and most humans can't hear the difference between 16/44.1 and 24/96, I'd go with the stereo track.    The only reason I can think of to use the full six channels (for stereo) would be if you wanted to use an audio editor to create your own custom downmix. 

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This seems to create a single file (wav/flac) at 96/24...
The WAV spec limits file size to 2GB (or 4GB depending on which spec you believe).  So, if you're getting one big file for the whole DVD, you should choose FLAC.

P.S
Speaking of file size.... If you're only listening in stereo... A 6 channel file is 3 times as big as a stereo file (all else being equal), and a 24/96 six-channel file is 9 times as big as a 16/48 stereo file!  (That assumes you're not using lossy compression.  With lossy compression, the file size is determined only be the bitrate.)

 

Ripping DVD-A Disks Question

Reply #2
I have been using DVD Audio Explorer to rip the 24/96 stereo tracks from various DVD-A disks. However, some don't apparently have the ability to "Get Stereo Downmix" so I tried the "Merge Groups" option. This seems to create a single file (wav/flac) at 96/24 but seems to have all the channels. My question then is this file playable and basically the same as a stereo downmix? And if I have albums with the stereo track that shows in DVD Audio Explorer  "Copying:Restricted, 1 copy; Audio Quality: 2 ch/48 kHz/16bit", but the multichannel tracks are 24/96, would I be better off NOT using the stereo downmix and use the "Merge Groups" to get 24/96? Sorry about my ignorance here, this is the first time I am trying to rip my dvd-a disks. Basically I just want to get the higest bit-rate/quality rips of all my DVD-A disks


why do you want a 'stereo downmix' in the first place?  Most DVD-As have a dedicated stereo mix on them...typically a remastered version of the original stereo mix.


 
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