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Topic: What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats? (Read 16066 times) previous topic - next topic
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What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

http://www.audible.com/audioformats

The Internets talks about an AAX+ format, too. DRM notwithstanding, are they compatible with any standard or 3rd party player?

 

What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

Reply #1
Audible maintains a list, on their web site, of payers that will work with their downloads.

What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

Reply #2
There is a link to their list at the bottom of the page you mentioned.

What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

Reply #3
wikipedia says .aa is usually mp3 or a speech codec.

What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

Reply #4
Thanks.

What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

Reply #5
The older .aa formats are apparently either ACELP or MP3, wrapped in Audible's proprietary DRM.

People say the 64kbps Audible Enhanced format is AAC-based; I can't find any reliable source for this but it obviously makes sense given that the format was introduced in 2009, is in a bitrate range where AAC has few competitors, and received device playback support fairly quickly.

What can be known about Audible AA, AAX and AAX+ formats?

Reply #6
http://osherove.com/blog/2008/7/6/introduc...ooks-drm-f.html
Though this hole has obviously been fixed since then.

The main point: the DRM is added when the file is downloaded, on the client side.

So I toyed around downloading a few files then aborting the downloads in the middle, this is what I have found:

Enhanced AAX files: VLC player neatly showed the chapters, so they are highly likely M4B, aka. AAC book files. Just like files from Downpour/Blackstone. They started to play though no sounds was heard. I don't know much about AAC files, this is the way they are supposed to work?

Lower levels: Could not play them at all. Strange.

 
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