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1
Listening Tests / Re: Personal blind listening test – MultiCodec at ~192 VBR kbps
Last post by IgorC -
But it does mean that there's no way to encode with Opus while targetting a specific quality level rather than a specific bitrate. And "targetting a specific bitrate" is nothing other than constraining the bitrate to some degree.
https://wiki.xiph.org/OpusFAQ#How_is_the_bitrate_setting_used_in_VBR_mode.3F

Quote
How is the bitrate setting used in VBR mode?
Variable bitrate (VBR) mode allows the bitrate to automatically vary over time based on the audio being encoded, in order to achieve a consistent quality

The bitrate setting controls the desired quality, on a scale that is calibrated to closely approximate the average bitrate that would be obtained over a large and diverse collection of audio. The actual bitrate of any particular audio stream may be higher or lower than this average.

Hence, it's quality based.
2
3rd Party Plugins - (fb2k) / Re: Biography Text, Album Info, Picture. www.last.fm
Last post by lender1257 -
hello MordredKLB + kgena_ua

thank you MordredKLB for your comments.
I agree with you that the size of the music db, the speed of the hdd and the computer are partly responsible for the loading time.
some music lovers will have 20,000 tracks (138 GB) or more. the pcs are 6 years old.

I tested wilb-bio-script today (not a single script error) and compared the start time with that of kgena_ua-script.
it seems (as you also say) that there is still room for improvement.

kind regards
4
Listening Tests / Re: Personal blind listening test – MultiCodec at ~192 VBR kbps
Last post by doccolinni -
P.S.2. It's simple to observe that only Opus was transparent on every killer sample. No way it would be possible if it hadn't well tuned VBR mode.  
It was not my intent to suggest that Opus's VBR "isn't VBR", nor that it isn't well tuned. Merely that it is - nevertheless - constrained, to some degree.

I mean, as long as the bitrate varies in any fashion, that's VBR - literally by definition. The bitrate is variable = variable bitrate = VBR. Whatever Exhale is doing is also VBR, because it produces files with variable bitrate.

I was not aware of the exact difference to which degree Exhale limits the variability of the bitrate compared to Opus, and I do agree that makes Exhale's VBR more constrained than Opus's. Nevertheless, the point remains that Opus has no way of encoding VBR without targetting a specific bitrate. I agree, this doesn't mean that Opus's VBR "isn't VBR". But it does mean that there's no way to encode with Opus while targetting a specific quality level rather than a specific bitrate. And "targetting a specific bitrate" is nothing other than constraining the bitrate to some degree. Yes, it's clearly incredibly well tuned - as obvious from the test results. If anything, the only thing I lament about this situation with Opus's VBR is that it could do even better than it already does, if it provided a way to encode VBR without having any specific target bitrate.
5
Digital A/V News / Re: Audacity will spy you
Last post by rutra80 -
* Detach from the modern world
* Go entirely off grid
* Live off the land
* Do away with society entirely.

Than you can be 100% Free. Then you will not have to worry about CPU microcode being copyrighted. Or anyone spying at all. Could be fun!
There's black and white and all in between. That it can't be white doesn't mean we have to agree to full blown black.
8
3rd Party Plugins - (fb2k) / Re: Biography Text, Album Info, Picture. www.last.fm
Last post by MordredKLB -
windows startup is completely done. HDD is running. no other programs are started.
starting fb for the first time --> 10+ seconds + script message.
if i stop fb and start it again immediately, it takes about 3 seconds and the message doesn't come up.
obviously there is still enough information in the memory.
The entire reason this is happening then is because it's loading your media library (which you admit is not small). At first startup foobar needs to read the hashes of every single directory in your library to ensure that nothing changed, and compare it to it's database, and then update changed files as needed. At second start that database is already in memory, and maybe directory hashes have been cached somewhere in the drive's buffer to cut down on reads. I don't know why it'd be so much faster, but it is.

At second startup this doesn't take as long. Again, this isn't really a problem with the script so much as an issue with FSM's execution being blocked. All the code optimizations in the world aren't going to solve this because the script isn't actually doing anything for large periods of time, and yet FSM's 10second slow script timer is still going.

I had the same exact issue when I ported Georgia over to FSM as well, but I don't think most people do otherwise we'd see this kind of complaint a lot more. Most likely it's a combination of media library size, HDD speed, and size of the scripts. @kgena_ua can attempt to work around the problem by executing parts of his script in async promises, which will periodically exit the script execution thread and reset the 10 second timer. That's what I did, and it solves the problem almost all the time except when I'm doing heavy writes/reads on another drive at the same time I startup foobar for the first time. The other solution is for him to remove a significant portion of the code (1-2k lines I'd guess), but that's probably not going to happen.
9
Listening Tests / Re: Personal blind listening test – MultiCodec at ~192 VBR kbps
Last post by IgorC -
Exhale's CVBR admits 1.25x variation of bitrate.
Opus VBR admits 2x ( for example target bitrate 128  kbps, peak 256 kbps) variation of bitrate and comparable to other VBR encoders. So, yes, it's VBR.

Every encoder has its own VBR implementation and adding it into some category doesn't reflect reality oftenly.
Whether it's  called "quality based" or "true" or  just "VBR" it's secondary. It's VBR.   


P.S. But if You wish,  Opus VBR implementation is quality based VBR.  It increases/decreases bitrate on type of signale (tonal, transients),  stereo (wide, narrow), complexity etc.... So  it's  "true" or "quality based"  if You wish to call it this way.
Opus has no fancy -V or -q mode instead Opus uses -b (bitrate) as targeting bitrate but it doesn't change the fact that it's VBR (outstanding and well tuned one)

P.S.2. It's simple to observe that only Opus was transparent on every killer sample. No way it would be possible if it hadn't well tuned VBR mode.  
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